Thor's Hammer


Roland Christen
 

At least that's what I call it, the outstretched hand and hammer in the neck of the Pelican Nebula, also known as IC 5070. It appears next to a cliff with what looks like a waterfall:

https://www.astrobin.com/6lbi12/C/

Testing out an older 12" F12.5 Mak-Cass which we built about 15 years ago but never put to use or sold. The mirror and corrector lens optics were made by Intes Micro when they were still operating. They are zero-expansion Sital. The rest of the mechanical parts were fabricated here. The tube is carbon fiber.

To take the image I added a CCD67 telecompressor in order to get a larger field. I took it in one night with just over 2 hours of H-a narrowband. It really needs longer exposure.

Rolando

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Bill Long
 

Looks solid. I had a RCOS made with sitall mirrors. Once you focused it for the night, it never needed it again. 


From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> on behalf of Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...>
Sent: Friday, October 1, 2021 7:34 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>; main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io>
Subject: [ap-gto] Thor's Hammer
 
At least that's what I call it, the outstretched hand and hammer in the neck of the Pelican Nebula, also known as IC 5070. It appears next to a cliff with what looks like a waterfall:

https://www.astrobin.com/6lbi12/C/

Testing out an older 12" F12.5 Mak-Cass which we built about 15 years ago but never put to use or sold. The mirror and corrector lens optics were made by Intes Micro when they were still operating. They are zero-expansion Sital. The rest of the mechanical parts were fabricated here. The tube is carbon fiber.

To take the image I added a CCD67 telecompressor in order to get a larger field. I took it in one night with just over 2 hours of H-a narrowband. It really needs longer exposure.

Rolando

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Eric Weiner
 

The man’s got skill and talent. 12” Mak-Cass f/12.5…. /drool

It’s a bit mind boggling you’d build something like that and wait 15 years to put it to use. Then again, having the assets at your daily disposal is beyond my comprehension.

Eric


Roland Christen
 

The focus doesn't change during the night. The only thing that changes is the FWHM which starts out at 1.25 arc sec and then slowly creeps up to around 1.7 as the sky scintillation gets worse by the hour. That's the local conditions here unfortunately. In a reall steady night I might get around 1 arc sec resolution with the QSI683 camera.

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Long <bill@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Oct 1, 2021 9:39 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Thor's Hammer

Looks solid. I had a RCOS made with sitall mirrors. Once you focused it for the night, it never needed it again. 


From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> on behalf of Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...>
Sent: Friday, October 1, 2021 7:34 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>; main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io>
Subject: [ap-gto] Thor's Hammer
 
At least that's what I call it, the outstretched hand and hammer in the neck of the Pelican Nebula, also known as IC 5070. It appears next to a cliff with what looks like a waterfall:

https://www.astrobin.com/6lbi12/C/

Testing out an older 12" F12.5 Mak-Cass which we built about 15 years ago but never put to use or sold. The mirror and corrector lens optics were made by Intes Micro when they were still operating. They are zero-expansion Sital. The rest of the mechanical parts were fabricated here. The tube is carbon fiber.

To take the image I added a CCD67 telecompressor in order to get a larger field. I took it in one night with just over 2 hours of H-a narrowband. It really needs longer exposure.

Rolando

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Jeff B
 

Great image.  The "little" Mach 2 is certainly hanging in there with that load and focal length.  I suspect it would make an excellent planetary imaging scope too.

Well done sir.

Jeff

On Fri, Oct 1, 2021 at 10:53 PM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
The focus doesn't change during the night. The only thing that changes is the FWHM which starts out at 1.25 arc sec and then slowly creeps up to around 1.7 as the sky scintillation gets worse by the hour. That's the local conditions here unfortunately. In a reall steady night I might get around 1 arc sec resolution with the QSI683 camera.

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Long <bill@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Oct 1, 2021 9:39 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Thor's Hammer

Looks solid. I had a RCOS made with sitall mirrors. Once you focused it for the night, it never needed it again. 


From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> on behalf of Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, October 1, 2021 7:34 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>; main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io>
Subject: [ap-gto] Thor's Hammer
 
At least that's what I call it, the outstretched hand and hammer in the neck of the Pelican Nebula, also known as IC 5070. It appears next to a cliff with what looks like a waterfall:


Testing out an older 12" F12.5 Mak-Cass which we built about 15 years ago but never put to use or sold. The mirror and corrector lens optics were made by Intes Micro when they were still operating. They are zero-expansion Sital. The rest of the mechanical parts were fabricated here. The tube is carbon fiber.

To take the image I added a CCD67 telecompressor in order to get a larger field. I took it in one night with just over 2 hours of H-a narrowband. It really needs longer exposure.

Rolando

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Roland Christen
 

Yes, it was originally made for both deep sky imaging and planetary. Problem is, around here the seeing is never very good, so getting any planetary detail is problematic. The scope needs to be in Florida down by the Gulf where the airflow is laminar.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: Jeff B <mnebula946@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Oct 1, 2021 10:04 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Thor's Hammer

Great image.  The "little" Mach 2 is certainly hanging in there with that load and focal length.  I suspect it would make an excellent planetary imaging scope too.

Well done sir.

Jeff

On Fri, Oct 1, 2021 at 10:53 PM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
The focus doesn't change during the night. The only thing that changes is the FWHM which starts out at 1.25 arc sec and then slowly creeps up to around 1.7 as the sky scintillation gets worse by the hour. That's the local conditions here unfortunately. In a reall steady night I might get around 1 arc sec resolution with the QSI683 camera.

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Long <bill@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Oct 1, 2021 9:39 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Thor's Hammer

Looks solid. I had a RCOS made with sitall mirrors. Once you focused it for the night, it never needed it again. 


From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> on behalf of Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, October 1, 2021 7:34 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>; main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io>
Subject: [ap-gto] Thor's Hammer
 
At least that's what I call it, the outstretched hand and hammer in the neck of the Pelican Nebula, also known as IC 5070. It appears next to a cliff with what looks like a waterfall:


Testing out an older 12" F12.5 Mak-Cass which we built about 15 years ago but never put to use or sold. The mirror and corrector lens optics were made by Intes Micro when they were still operating. They are zero-expansion Sital. The rest of the mechanical parts were fabricated here. The tube is carbon fiber.

To take the image I added a CCD67 telecompressor in order to get a larger field. I took it in one night with just over 2 hours of H-a narrowband. It really needs longer exposure.

Rolando

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


ap@CaptivePhotons.com
 

Roland Christen wrote:

 

  • Yes, it was originally made for both deep sky imaging and planetary. Problem is, around here the seeing is never very good, so getting any planetary detail is problematic. The scope needs to be in Florida down by the Gulf where the airflow is laminar.

 

I can have my “Home for wayward telescopes” web site configured in a jiffy if you want to apply.  😊

 


Roland Christen
 

Mmmmm....



-----Original Message-----
From: ap@... <ap@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Oct 1, 2021 10:13 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Thor's Hammer

Roland Christen wrote:
 
  • Yes, it was originally made for both deep sky imaging and planetary. Problem is, around here the seeing is never very good, so getting any planetary detail is problematic. The scope needs to be in Florida down by the Gulf where the airflow is laminar.
 
I can have my “Home for wayward telescopes” web site configured in a jiffy if you want to apply.  😊
 

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Mike Dodd
 

On 10/1/2021 10:34 PM, Roland Christen via groups.io wrote:
At least that's what I call it, the outstretched hand and hammer in the
neck of the Pelican Nebula, also known as IC 5070. It appears next to a
cliff with what looks like a waterfall:
https://www.astrobin.com/6lbi12/C/
Sixteen years ago, using a C9.25 SCT @ f/5.6 and an ST-8 camera, I imaged that same area in Ha, and came away with a much different impression -- the larger region looks like an erupting volcano. So much so, that I colored the image in Photoshop, and named it "Hydrogen Volcano." Here's that image: <http://astronomy.mdodd.com/nebulae-05.html>

BTW, the pelican Nebula is indeed known as IC5070, but I believe the small region we both captured is IC5067.

--- Mike


Joel Short
 

Smooth and sharp in all the right places!  It really does look like a hammer.  
What I wouldn't give to wander the halls of Astro-Physics and see the treasures therein.  :)  Or better yet, get a chance to use them.  What fun it must be to pull out a scope and think, "I wonder what this scope is like" and actually be able to play with it.  
joel

On Fri, Oct 1, 2021 at 10:17 PM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Mmmmm....



-----Original Message-----
From: ap@... <ap@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Oct 1, 2021 10:13 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Thor's Hammer

Roland Christen wrote:
 
  • Yes, it was originally made for both deep sky imaging and planetary. Problem is, around here the seeing is never very good, so getting any planetary detail is problematic. The scope needs to be in Florida down by the Gulf where the airflow is laminar.
 
I can have my “Home for wayward telescopes” web site configured in a jiffy if you want to apply.  😊
 

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Roland Christen
 

Certainly looks like a volcano. I posted an image with my 160 refractor that looks like a Tornado forming:

https://www.astrobin.com/full/pkkm0d/0/

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: Mike Dodd <mike@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Oct 1, 2021 10:18 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Thor's Hammer

On 10/1/2021 10:34 PM, Roland Christen via groups.io wrote:

> At least that's what I call it, the outstretched hand and hammer in the
> neck of the Pelican Nebula, also known as IC 5070. It appears next to a
> cliff with what looks like a waterfall:
> https://www.astrobin.com/6lbi12/C/


Sixteen years ago, using a C9.25 SCT @ f/5.6 and an ST-8 camera, I
imaged that same area in Ha, and came away with a much different
impression -- the larger region looks like an erupting volcano. So much
so, that I colored the image in Photoshop, and named it "Hydrogen
Volcano." Here's that image: <http://astronomy.mdodd.com/nebulae-05.html>

BTW, the pelican Nebula is indeed known as IC5070, but I believe the
small region we both captured is IC5067.

--- Mike







--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Sébastien Doré
 

To me that tornado looks like an interplanetary wormhole structure from an advanced extraterrestrial species... ;)

Seriously, I always find these very pleasing to see that zoomed-in. They are interesting objects as well. Supposedly created by newborn stars accelerated ionised gas going through dense nebulas.

(https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbig–Haro_object) 

Nice catch Roland and Mike!
Sébastien 

Le 1 oct. 2021 à 23:53, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> a écrit :


Certainly looks like a volcano. I posted an image with my 160 refractor that looks like a Tornado forming:

https://www.astrobin.com/full/pkkm0d/0/

Rolando