Slide Rules and Slipsticks - in the 1960's B.C. - i.e. (Before Computers)


Roland Christen
 

We had a giant one up on the wall in the math lecture room at the Rochester Institute of Technology. It was used to teach incoming engineering students (like myself).

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: Karen Christen <karen@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>
Sent: Sat, Mar 13, 2021 10:34 am
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Slide Rules and Slipsticks - in the 1960's B.C. - i.e. (Before Computers)

This whole topic has been hilarious.  Barry wins.
Karen
AP
 
From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of Barry Megdal
Sent: Friday, March 12, 2021 8:21 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Slide Rules and Slipsticks - in the 1960's B.C. - i.e. (Before Computers)
 
Yes – that is a 6-foot slide rule on the wall.  Couldn’t resist buying it years ago at a garage sale.  These used to hang on the blackboard in my high school chemistry class so they could teach us how to use them.
 
And my new Mach2 in the foreground just to make the photo appropriate for this forum J
 
 
Dr. Barry Megdal
 
President
Shb Instruments, Inc.
19215 Parthenia St.  Suite A
Northridge, CA 91324
(818) 773-2000  (818)773-2005 fax
 
Faculty (retired)
Dept. of Electrical Engineering
Caltech
 

--
Karen Christen
Astro-Physics

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Eric Dreher
 

Having grown up during the Mercury launches onward, my childhood hero became Wernher von Braun.  During a 2016 visit to the Cosmosphere Space Museum in Hutchinson, Kansas, I spotted a slide rule in a glass display case.  For obvious reasons, I had to take a photo.


Joe Zeglinski
 

    I think the note above Von Braun’s slide rule is appropriate.
Recall the movie sequence in APOLLO-13, Tom Hanks is asking mission control to double check his gimbal angle corrections. The scene shows the guy on the desk giving a thumbs up after verifying with his K&E slide rule. One man with a slide rule can do wonders. They had an IBM-7094 but no calculators for that? Rescue hinged on a slide rule.
 
    Certainly reinforced my respect for the ground control team, and what could be done without massive computers.
 
Joe
 

From: Eric Dreher
Sent: Saturday, March 13, 2021 3:00 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Slide Rules and Slipsticks - in the 1960's B.C. - i.e. (Before Computers)
 
Having grown up during the Mercury launches onward, my childhood hero became Wernher von Braun.  During a 2016 visit to the Cosmosphere Space Museum in Hutchinson, Kansas, I spotted a slide rule in a glass display case.  For obvious reasons, I had to take a photo.


Richard O'Neill <syzygy42@earthlink.net>
 

I still have my Pickett rules, A pocket size 6" and two 12", all in leather cases. Surprisingly, after more than fifty years I still remember how to use most of the scales!

Richard


weems@...
 

Through most of middle and high school I used a circular slide rule. In senior year I used money from my grocery store job to buy an HP45. When I got to engineering school, one professor insisted that pocket calculators were a fad, that circular rules were not good enough, and that I had to buy a straight rule. The local engineering supply had, for a while, taken top-quality rules in trade for calculators. So I was able to pick up a used Dietzgen 1734, with a mahogany core and teflon bearings, very cheaply. I still use it in my CS classes, as an example of 0th generation computing technology. It is still in its orange box and leather holster, with the manual wrapped around it. 

Early computers I've used and/or programmed include: IBM 360/20, 360/40, 1130, 1620, PDP 8/L, 8/E, 8/I, 12, VAX 11/780, CDC 3300, Cyber 74, Cyber 180. Also a research machine using a glass delay line associative memory in combination with surplus core memory units from the IBM 7030 (I still have some of the core planes, drivers, and manuals). The 3300 had the coolest console of any of them, with rows of projected octal digits. The research machine had the weirdest instruction (skip on sunny Sundays). 

Chip


Don Anderson
 

Oh the memories! Post a pic of the Dietzn.

Don Anderson


On Thursday, March 18, 2021, 12:27:51 p.m. MDT, weems@... <weems@...> wrote:


Through most of middle and high school I used a circular slide rule. In senior year I used money from my grocery store job to buy an HP45. When I got to engineering school, one professor insisted that pocket calculators were a fad, that circular rules were not good enough, and that I had to buy a straight rule. The local engineering supply had, for a while, taken top-quality rules in trade for calculators. So I was able to pick up a used Dietzgen 1734, with a mahogany core and teflon bearings, very cheaply. I still use it in my CS classes, as an example of 0th generation computing technology. It is still in its orange box and leather holster, with the manual wrapped around it. 

Early computers I've used and/or programmed include: IBM 360/20, 360/40, 1130, 1620, PDP 8/L, 8/E, 8/I, 12, VAX 11/780, CDC 3300, Cyber 74, Cyber 180. Also a research machine using a glass delay line associative memory in combination with surplus core memory units from the IBM 7030 (I still have some of the core planes, drivers, and manuals). The 3300 had the coolest console of any of them, with rows of projected octal digits. The research machine had the weirdest instruction (skip on sunny Sundays). 

Chip