Pier for AP 1200 GTO


Dan Knauss <dknauss@...>
 

I will be taking delivery of an Astro Physics 1200 GTO mount around the
end of August. It will be used in a permanent installation with a Newtonian
telescope. I need a two foot high pier that will accept the standard 1200
GTO mounting plate. I could use the AP 24" portable pier but I would prefer
not to have the legs of a portable pier protruding out where I would
inevitably trip over them.

Does anyone know of a source for a 24" pier that will accept the AP 1200
GTO mounting plate? I E-mailed Le Sueur Mfg. today and asked them if they
make such a pier. The problem is, the pier would have to be attached to an
already existing concrete floor. My observatory floor does not have any
bolts mounted in the floor when it was poured. Is there a technique to
drill holes in concrete and insert mounting bolts in some kind of expander
that will be sufficiently strong to hold the mount and the telescope?

Dan Knauss


Bobby Middleton <bobm@...>
 

----- Original Message -----


Does anyone know of a source for a 24" pier that will accept the AP
1200
GTO mounting plate? I E-mailed Le Sueur Mfg. today and asked them if they
make such a pier. The problem is, the pier would have to be attached to
an
already existing concrete floor. My observatory floor does not have any
bolts mounted in the floor when it was poured. Is there a technique to
drill holes in concrete and insert mounting bolts in some kind of expander
that will be sufficiently strong to hold the mount and the telescope?
Dan Knauss
Dan, if it were me I might consider a sledge hammer to bust out a large
enough hole to dig a deep hole for a new steel pipe pier with post hole
diggers. You might have some rough spots when you re-pour the pier and
busted out hole, but then you can lay down some carpet or some other floor
covering to hide the less than smooth finish. A pier set deep in a good
amount of concrete will be rock-solid. You might also look at my pier with
1200 GTO on top at this web-site:
http://www.koyote.com/users/bobm/my_equipment.htm

Bobby Middleton


Ron Wodaski <ronw@...>
 

That will only work if you won't be walking on that floor during
observing/imaging. A concrete slab is very effective at transmitting
vibrations; it will act like a drum. As someone else has already mentioned,
you need to isolate the pier from the floor. Depending on construction, you
may be able to cut out a square under the pier and it will be solid, but
most of the time you will have to tear up a chunk of floor, dig down and
pour a footing, and then mount your pier to that.

Ron Wodaski

-----Original Message-----
From: Dan Knauss [mailto:dknauss@azstarnet.com]
Sent: Saturday, March 18, 2000 9:33 AM
To: ap-gto@egroups.com
Subject: [ap-gto] Pier for AP 1200 GTO


I will be taking delivery of an Astro Physics 1200 GTO mount around the
end of August. It will be used in a permanent installation with a Newtonian
telescope. I need a two foot high pier that will accept the standard 1200
GTO mounting plate. I could use the AP 24" portable pier but I would prefer
not to have the legs of a portable pier protruding out where I would
inevitably trip over them.

Does anyone know of a source for a 24" pier that will accept the AP 1200
GTO mounting plate? I E-mailed Le Sueur Mfg. today and asked them if they
make such a pier. The problem is, the pier would have to be attached to an
already existing concrete floor. My observatory floor does not have any
bolts mounted in the floor when it was poured. Is there a technique to
drill holes in concrete and insert mounting bolts in some kind of expander
that will be sufficiently strong to hold the mount and the telescope?

Dan Knauss




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Rich N. <rnapo@...>
 

They have portable saws that cut concrete.
I'm he could get someone to cut a square
hold in the concrete. He may even find someone
with a saw that can cut a nice, clean, round hole
in the concrete.

Rich

Dan, if it were me I might consider a sledge hammer to bust out a large
enough hole to dig a deep hole for a new steel pipe pier with post hole
diggers. You might have some rough spots when you re-pour the pier and
busted out hole, but then you can lay down some carpet or some other floor
covering to hide the less than smooth finish. A pier set deep in a good
amount of concrete will be rock-solid. You might also look at my pier with
1200 GTO on top at this web-site:
http://www.koyote.com/users/bobm/my_equipment.htm

Bobby Middleton



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John Menke <domepage@...>
 

My 1200 pier is a piece of pipe from the junkyard. The ID was about
1/4" larger than the mount base, so I filled it with 1/8 in. al bar.
The pier sits on a 15 ft dia concrete pad (with a small piece of plywood
as a buffer). I use 3 tie rods anchored in the concrete to hold the
pier down. Works great. The pad tilts about 2 a-sec as a person moves
one side to the other, not a problem for me. Enjoy your 1200--we do!
John menke
Technical Innovations inc (www.homedome.com)

Dan Knauss wrote:


I will be taking delivery of an Astro Physics 1200 GTO mount around the
end of August. It will be used in a permanent installation with a Newtonian
telescope. I need a two foot high pier that will accept the standard 1200
GTO mounting plate. I could use the AP 24" portable pier but I would prefer
not to have the legs of a portable pier protruding out where I would
inevitably trip over them.

Does anyone know of a source for a 24" pier that will accept the AP 1200
GTO mounting plate? I E-mailed Le Sueur Mfg. today and asked them if they
make such a pier. The problem is, the pier would have to be attached to an
already existing concrete floor. My observatory floor does not have any
bolts mounted in the floor when it was poured. Is there a technique to
drill holes in concrete and insert mounting bolts in some kind of expander
that will be sufficiently strong to hold the mount and the telescope?

Dan Knauss

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lowest prices on all the latest Palms and accessories when you
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Ed Couture <edcouture@...>
 

After spending $$$$ for the AP 1200 mount, I suggest the following.
Have a hole cut in the floor, dig down at least 4 feet and pour a
concrete pad with mounting bolts to attach a pier. Any welding shop
will be able to make you a pier, try local salvage yards for materials.
The mistake I made was cementing the pipe into the hole. Although it is
very solid, the height was for an 11" SCT. Since then I have gone to
the 6" refractor. Now it was too low and I had to have extensions made
and welded. This way if you ever decide to change over to a refractor
or SCT, it will be easy to remove the pier, add an extension or have a
new one made.

Make sure you isolate the pier from the floor !!!!

Ed Couture


Dan Knauss <dknauss@...>
 

My thanks to everyone who responded to my question regarding a pier for
my 1200 GTO. The consensus is that I should have a hole cut in the concrete
pad and pour a pier foundation in it. The problem is that the center three
square feet of my observatory extends four feet into the ground and the
mount has to be placed in the center of the observatory. This was done to
provide a solid foundation for my current mount which is not bolted to the
floor. It certainly did what it was intended to do, no vibrations at all,
but from lack of foresight, I failed to sink some bolts into the pad and
that's why I raised the question.

Looks like I must go with the portable pier.

Dan