Deep Trifid from Hawaii Island


Roland Christen
 

I thought I would post this first to our group before making it available to the general public. This is a multi-week project that I was working on while testing mounts, CP4 and keypad functions during our recent trip to Hawaii Island. The very dark and clear skies made it possible to get some deep narrowband data.

The image was taken with my 175EDF refractor, my trusty QSI WSG8 camera, all mounted on a 1600 AE mount. I started each night with the scope under the mount, about 3.5 hours from the zenith and finished about 3.5 hours in the west with the scope on top. Seeing varied all over the place, at times better than 1.8 arc sec, and at worst over 6 arc sec. I used all frames to build the faint background image and then used the best frames for the central bright nebula.

Scope, mount and camera worked like a champ, and the roll-off roof only gave us one bad scare when the roof motor system blew a bearing. Marj and I worked until 3 am to get the roof closed, cause it does rain there occasionally. A quick call to Scott at Backyard Observatories got us a new shaft and bearing set in 2 days and we were back in business.

https://www.astrobin.com/full/bjp0m9/0/

Rolando

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Jeff B
 

Wow Roland, it looks three dimensional.  

Well done sir!

Jeff

On Tue, Aug 3, 2021 at 7:35 PM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I thought I would post this first to our group before making it available to the general public. This is a multi-week project that I was working on while testing mounts, CP4 and keypad functions during our recent trip to Hawaii Island. The very dark and clear skies made it possible to get some deep narrowband data.

The image was taken with my 175EDF refractor, my trusty QSI WSG8 camera, all mounted on a 1600 AE mount. I started each night with the scope under the mount, about 3.5 hours from the zenith and finished about 3.5 hours in the west with the scope on top. Seeing varied all over the place, at times better than 1.8 arc sec, and at worst over 6 arc sec. I used all frames to build the faint background image and then used the best frames for the central bright nebula.

Scope, mount and camera worked like a champ, and the roll-off roof only gave us one bad scare when the roof motor system blew a bearing. Marj and I worked until 3 am to get the roof closed, cause it does rain there occasionally. A quick call to Scott at Backyard Observatories got us a new shaft and bearing set in 2 days and we were back in business.


Rolando

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Cheng-Yang Tan
 

On Tuesday, August 3, 2021, 6:41 PM, Jeff B <mnebula946@...> wrote:

Wow Roland, it looks three dimensional.  

Well done sir!

Jeff

On Tue, Aug 3, 2021 at 7:35 PM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I thought I would post this first to our group before making it available to the general public. This is a multi-week project that I was working on while testing mounts, CP4 and keypad functions during our recent trip to Hawaii Island. The very dark and clear skies made it possible to get some deep narrowband data.

The image was taken with my 175EDF refractor, my trusty QSI WSG8 camera, all mounted on a 1600 AE mount. I started each night with the scope under the mount, about 3.5 hours from the zenith and finished about 3.5 hours in the west with the scope on top. Seeing varied all over the place, at times better than 1.8 arc sec, and at worst over 6 arc sec. I used all frames to build the faint background image and then used the best frames for the central bright nebula.

Scope, mount and camera worked like a champ, and the roll-off roof only gave us one bad scare when the roof motor system blew a bearing. Marj and I worked until 3 am to get the roof closed, cause it does rain there occasionally. A quick call to Scott at Backyard Observatories got us a new shaft and bearing set in 2 days and we were back in business.


Rolando

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics