Building a custom powerwerx extension cable for CP4 power supply. Question?


Benton Reed
 

I am building a custom extension for a CP4 controller.  
1. What weight cable is recommended? 8 ga or 10ga?  
2. What Power pole connector would be advisable?  30 amp or 45 amp? 

I know AP has them on the site, but need 24" not 18".  

Thanks! 


Horia
 

AWG12 should be way more than sufficient. I would take AWG14 and 15Amp Power Poles. For reliable connections, you may need a crimp tool.

 

Regards,

Horia

 

 

 

Von: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> Im Auftrag von Benton Reed
Gesendet: Samstag, 4. September 2021 06:33
An: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Betreff: [ap-gto] Building a custom powerwerx extension cable for CP4 power supply. Question?

 

I am building a custom extension for a CP4 controller.  
1. What weight cable is recommended? 8 ga or 10ga?  
2. What Power pole connector would be advisable?  30 amp or 45 amp? 

I know AP has them on the site, but need 24" not 18".  

Thanks! 


Christopher Erickson
 

18GA wire is sufficient for the small current draw of a CP4 and AP motors, up to maybe 2M in length. Maybe 16GA for lengths up to 4M and 14GA for lengths up to maybe 8M. 

Anything larger will work just fine too. But no need for serious copper overkill.

"My advice is always free and worth every penny!"

-Christopher Erickson
Observatory Engineer
Summit Kinetics
Waikoloa, Hawaii


On Fri, Sep 3, 2021 at 6:33 PM Benton Reed <hbentonreed@...> wrote:
I am building a custom extension for a CP4 controller.  
1. What weight cable is recommended? 8 ga or 10ga?  
2. What Power pole connector would be advisable?  30 amp or 45 amp? 

I know AP has them on the site, but need 24" not 18".  

Thanks! 


Jeffc
 

Fwiw.. after building many powerpole cables for AP mounts going back 10 years, and also ham radio stuff... for the last round with the mach2 I just purchased pre-assembled extension cables....   Like this:  https://www.amazon.com/LIXIN-Battery-Adapter-Generator-Inverter/dp/B07XR7MMJZ/ref=psdc_13638744011_t3_B091J3QTPK

I'm powering the mount and UPBV2+camera+dewstrap+focuser, using a GoalZero Yeti which has powerpole on the output.
I use one of these pre-assembled cables to go to a small rig-runner, then another from the rigrunner to the thru-mount connector.
Fwiw, afaict, these would also work to extend the new style AP power cable.

Note the powerpole end is configured a bit differently -- I just needed to slide out the red/black connectors and slide them together into the appropriate configuration.

-jeff


On Sat, Sep 4, 2021 at 1:04 AM Christopher Erickson <christopher.k.erickson@...> wrote:
18GA wire is sufficient for the small current draw of a CP4 and AP motors, up to maybe 2M in length. Maybe 16GA for lengths up to 4M and 14GA for lengths up to maybe 8M. 

Anything larger will work just fine too. But no need for serious copper overkill.

"My advice is always free and worth every penny!"

-Christopher Erickson
Observatory Engineer
Summit Kinetics
Waikoloa, Hawaii


On Fri, Sep 3, 2021 at 6:33 PM Benton Reed <hbentonreed@...> wrote:
I am building a custom extension for a CP4 controller.  
1. What weight cable is recommended? 8 ga or 10ga?  
2. What Power pole connector would be advisable?  30 amp or 45 amp? 

I know AP has them on the site, but need 24" not 18".  

Thanks! 


Benton Reed
 

Thank you! This helped tremendously!


Christopher M
 

Whenever I'm going to make a custom DC power cable, I usually use one of the online wire guage calculators.  Enter parameters such as total wire length (there and back), estimated maximum current, that it is DC and not AC, and allowable voltage drop at the usage end.  The calculator then returns a minimum recommended wire gauge to use.  Selecting a heavier gauge wire will reduce your voltage drop at the usage end but at the expense of added weight and $.  Once you know the wire guage then you will know what Powerpole pins to select.
Other things to consider when building a cable are the expected temperature range, permanent or portable installation, and rodent resistance.
If you will be using the cable in temperatures above freezing, then most insulations are likely fine.  If you will use it in the winter well below freezing, then most insulations will NOT be fine, either getting too stiff or possibly cracking when flexed.  For cold weather fexible cable I have been using high conductor count silicone insulated wire found in the hobby industry (HobbyKing, local hobby shop, etc).  Very flexible, but the downside is the silicone insulation is also soft and easily damaged, so I then put the nearly finished cable in braided wire loom (many RV trailer shops, electrical suppliers).  This also helps keep the wires together and from snagging.  Some heat shrink at both ends keeps the braiding from unravelling.
If your target installation is permanent, you can get away with lower conductor count wire (I think standard is 7), but also keep an eye on the insulation as many modern insulations are vegetable based, and RODENTS love to chew on it.  Mmmmm!
-Chris