bugs in my 1200!


Steven Panish
 

I think this is a George or Howard question, but any knowlegable input is welcome. 

After removing the saddle from my 1200, I saw that the unused perimeter screw holes in th dec head had been stuffed with mud, likely by a mud dauber or similar wasp enthralled by such a nice nursery site.  I used a small screwdriver to break out the dried mud, and then vacuumed the holes, but for sure some of the dirt went inside the head, and the threads are still clogged and more dirt will be broken loose when I use those holes.  Is that area inside the head sensitive to the dirt?  Should I remove the cap screws and pull the housing to clean it, or is further cleaning unnecessary?

I guess the bird poop question can go to another group....

thanks,

Steve


Howard Hedlund
 

Hi Steve,

I'm going to refer this to our mount assembly wizard at the shop.  Look for a response from Dave.

Howard


Howard Hedlund
 

Hi Steve,
Dave asked me to write the response.  I have attached a simple drawing in a PDF that he provided.  The good news is that the 6 perimeter holes are NOT through-holes.  The only 2 holes of possible concern are highlighted in the drawing.  I'm guessing they were covered by your plate.  For cleaning the holes out, he suggested using a 1/4-20 tap.


Steven Panish
 

Thanks for the response Howard.  It was just 4 perimeter holes, as you thought.  I cleaned them out with about 50 Q-tips with soap solution and probed around until I got all the dirt out.  There was never any gritty sound like the Ded bearings were contaminated so I figured it was fine and reassembled with my new tandem saddle rig.  All is well.

Steve

On Thu, Apr 22, 2021 at 11:24 AM Howard Hedlund <howard@...> wrote:
Hi Steve,
Dave asked me to write the response.  I have attached a simple drawing in a PDF that he provided.  The good news is that the 6 perimeter holes are NOT through-holes.  The only 2 holes of possible concern are highlighted in the drawing.  I'm guessing they were covered by your plate.  For cleaning the holes out, he suggested using a 1/4-20 tap.