Bonk to the noggin


KHursh
 

I whacked my head on my telescope the other just before bringing it inside. No damage to scope or head I think, however the Mach2 moved in the dec axis a bit from its park position so that now the lines that are usually lined up are offset by a centimeter. The easy thing to do is loosen the clutches and line it back up. Should I do this or "home" it when I have everything all back together again? Thanks


Roland Christen
 

You have not disturbed the internal alignment of the encoders. Just home it or park it, or loosen the clutches and manually move it so the marks line up. In fact, the mount really doesn't care how you point the axes, the encoders keep track of where it was bumped to. Lining up the marks is totally unnecessary for this mount.

Remember, you can  loosen the clutches at any time and put the mount into any cockamamie position, power on or off, and the encoders always know where the axes are pointed. Pressing Park3 will send the mount to the proper position. The Mach2 is NOT the same as the 1100/1600 where you would lose the alignment of the encoder if the mount was moved via the clutches.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: KHursh via groups.io <khursh@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Apr 15, 2022 7:29 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] Bonk to the noggin

I whacked my head on my telescope the other just before bringing it inside. No damage to scope or head I think, however the Mach2 moved in the dec axis a bit from its park position so that now the lines that are usually lined up are offset by a centimeter. The easy thing to do is loosen the clutches and line it back up. Should I do this or "home" it when I have everything all back together again? Thanks

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Roland Christen
 

The Mach 2 mount does not need to be told where to resume from when you start your next session. Just resume from Present Position. It works perfectly regardless of where you left it, even if you left it upside down. The mount will figure out where it is at all times to the 1/10 arc second. It does not need to have the marks lined up to know perfectly where the axes are pointed.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Apr 15, 2022 8:13 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Bonk to the noggin

You have not disturbed the internal alignment of the encoders. Just home it or park it, or loosen the clutches and manually move it so the marks line up. In fact, the mount really doesn't care how you point the axes, the encoders keep track of where it was bumped to. Lining up the marks is totally unnecessary for this mount.

Remember, you can  loosen the clutches at any time and put the mount into any cockamamie position, power on or off, and the encoders always know where the axes are pointed. Pressing Park3 will send the mount to the proper position. The Mach2 is NOT the same as the 1100/1600 where you would lose the alignment of the encoder if the mount was moved via the clutches.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: KHursh via groups.io <khursh@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Apr 15, 2022 7:29 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] Bonk to the noggin

I whacked my head on my telescope the other just before bringing it inside. No damage to scope or head I think, however the Mach2 moved in the dec axis a bit from its park position so that now the lines that are usually lined up are offset by a centimeter. The easy thing to do is loosen the clutches and line it back up. Should I do this or "home" it when I have everything all back together again? Thanks

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


KHursh
 

Great. I'll just leave it be then. Honestly, the Mach2 is so easy to use, it would be the perfect first mount.


Wayne Hixson
 

I’ve had 4 AP mounts and it’s by far my favorite. Especially  not having to do a dance if it gets “lost”!


fernandorivera3
 

Might not be a bad idea to wear a helmet the next time being close to the scope to prevent getting "whacked" in the head again 

Fernando


Beau Gagne
 

Do the newer versions of the 1100 have the same capabilities?  Not losing alignment when moving via clutches, that is.


W Hilmo
 

No.  The AP1100 and AP1600 have a different arrangement for the encoders.  It would be a major redesign to change this (and we might lose the ability to separate the axes and we might give up through-the-mount cabling).

 

From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of beau.gagne@...
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2022 7:17 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Bonk to the noggin

 

Do the newer versions of the 1100 have the same capabilities?  Not losing alignment when moving via clutches, that is.


ap@CaptivePhotons.com
 

On Sat, Apr 16, 2022 at 11:16 AM, W Hilmo wrote:
The AP1100 and AP1600 have a different arrangement for the encoders.  It would be a major redesign to change this (and we might lose the ability to separate the axes and we might give up through-the-mount cabling).
And once you understand, they are VERY easy to get back where you need them if you screw up the location, and I went with the 1100 (vs Mach 2) largely because of that wonderful, huge thru-the-mount cabling.  HUGE. 

Nice to have choices. 

Linwood


Roland Christen
 

No, the 1100/1600 will lose position because the encoders are attached to the gearwheel instead of the shaft. When you loosen the clutches and turn the axes, you are not turning the gearwheel, just the shaft.

In the Mach2 the encoders are attached to the shaft, not the gearwheel, so when you loosen the clutches and turn the axes, you are turning the shaft and the encoders pick up the rotation.

The Mach2 is more complicated and heavier for its size and is very limited in the amount of space that can be used for thru-mount cabling.

Roland

-----Original Message-----
From: beau.gagne@...
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Apr 15, 2022 9:17 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Bonk to the noggin

Do the newer versions of the 1100 have the same capabilities?  Not losing alignment when moving via clutches, that is.

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics