Challenge object: Tiny faint galaxy grouping in Ursa Major


Brent Boshart
 

I could not identify a satellite going through your FOV at that time. There was a StarLink near the end but it was eclipsed. As others mentioned, it maybe was an aircraft. This is from a database of over 5,000 but there are lots of classified satellites not in the database.


Roland Christen
 

That particular image was started 04:24:18 hh:mm:ss Universal time, ended 600 sec later.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: Brent Boshart <bboshart@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Apr 27, 2022 11:19 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Challenge object: Tiny faint galaxy grouping in Ursa Major

If you can tell me the time (start and end) of the the corkscrew satellite sub, I may be able to identify it.

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Roland Christen
 

Sounds like a challenging object. maybe have to ask one of my astronomer friends in Hawaii if I could use the 20" University Hawaii scope on Mauna Loa next time I'm up there.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: Steve Armen <st5.armen@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Apr 27, 2022 10:17 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Challenge object: Tiny faint galaxy grouping in Ursa Major

That is nice sensitivity with the big Cassegrain. 

Never have seen a satellite look like that. 

Another great target for the big 17" Cass would be Andromeda's Parachute - gravitationally lensed quasar. Not the right time of year just yet. In June in your area will be up late ~ 2am. I've goofed around attempting to image it with my idk10 silly, not enough focal length or mirror.

RA: 1 : 47 : 9.53 
DEC: 46 : 30 : 35

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Brent Boshart
 

If you can tell me the time (start and end) of the the corkscrew satellite sub, I may be able to identify it.


 

wow that is some crazy specs there Roland

Scope focal length 3454mm
Image scale 0.322 arc sec per pixel
Individual 1200 sec resolution 1.5 arc sec FWHM
Guiding accuracy 0.18 arc sec rms
Seeing: 3/5  -  Clear Sky Clock


On Wed, Apr 27, 2022 at 6:54 PM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Wanted to see how faint I could go here at my light polluted industrial park. Local amateurs pointed out a tiny grouping of faint galaxies that they haven't been able to get much info on them or any detailed images. I tried with my 130EDF, 10" F8 Mak-Cass and finally with my 17" F8 Astrograph. Main limitation is the amount of background sky brightness here due to severe light pollution, but I'm always up to a challenge. The galaxies showed up in a wide field image in my 130GTX as a tiny little group, showed some small amount of detail in the 10", but it took the 17" to finally reveal some better detail. 
Star resolution last night was 1.5 arc sec FWHM and guiding was under 0.2 arc sec FWHM for the 20 minute exposures. Had some horrific satellite trails that had to be removed, otherwise everything went fairly smoothly.



I had one satellite trail that resembled a corkscrew, never have I seen anything like that. See below.


--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics



--
Brian 



Brian Valente


Steve Armen
 

That is nice sensitivity with the big Cassegrain. 

Never have seen a satellite look like that. 

Another great target for the big 17" Cass would be Andromeda's Parachute - gravitationally lensed quasar. Not the right time of year just yet. In June in your area will be up late ~ 2am. I've goofed around attempting to image it with my idk10 silly, not enough focal length or mirror.

RA: 1 : 47 : 9.53 
DEC: 46 : 30 : 35


Roland Christen
 

Wanted to see how faint I could go here at my light polluted industrial park. Local amateurs pointed out a tiny grouping of faint galaxies that they haven't been able to get much info on them or any detailed images. I tried with my 130EDF, 10" F8 Mak-Cass and finally with my 17" F8 Astrograph. Main limitation is the amount of background sky brightness here due to severe light pollution, but I'm always up to a challenge. The galaxies showed up in a wide field image in my 130GTX as a tiny little group, showed some small amount of detail in the 10", but it took the 17" to finally reveal some better detail. 
Star resolution last night was 1.5 arc sec FWHM and guiding was under 0.2 arc sec FWHM for the 20 minute exposures. Had some horrific satellite trails that had to be removed, otherwise everything went fairly smoothly.

https://www.astrobin.com/ynxjhk/0/


I had one satellite trail that resembled a corkscrew, never have I seen anything like that. See below.


--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics