November 2021 Red Beaver Moon


Roland Christen
 

Great, very nice! You got a nice eclipsed Moon there.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: eja24601 via groups.io <eja24601@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Nov 19, 2021 4:51 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] November 2021 Red Beaver Moon

November 18 was started off mostly cloudy, but the forecasts (TV meteorologists included) all pointed to clear skies for the eclipse. With that in mind, I got up at 1AM to start preparing for a go at capturing a sequence. Unfortunately, despite forecasts (Astrospheric and the Clear Sky Clock included) for a partly cloudy sky at that time, it was overcast. The Beaver Moon did punch through some sucker holes and thinning layers long enough for me to come to focus with my telescope/camera. However, the clouds stubbornly hung around. 2:30 came and went with no signs of the clouds dispersing. I finally decided to try and nap until 3:30. I tossed and turned restlessly and finally decided to check conditions around 3:20. Lo and behold, the clouds had parted, with the eclipse partway through.

I hurried to our telescope, consoling myself that if I wouldn't be able to capture a sequence, I would at least attempt an HDR composite. Other than a thin cloud that seemed to mock my first attempt at bracketed exposures, the sky remained clear for the rest of the night. I shot a sequence of bracketed exposures all the way through about 5:45AM, so I have a lot of data to play with as I attempt other HDR composites.

In between capturing images, I thought for a change to view the eclipse visually with a scope. Binoculars views were good but shaky (hand-held, no surprise). So I brought out a Borg 76ED and gazed visually. The view with a 15mm TV Plossl was mesmerizing. My HDR composite is a weak attempt at capturing what I saw through the eyepiece.

That said, here is an attempt at an HDR composite of the eclipse near maximum (taken around 4:05AM). This was taken with a Canon Digital Rebel t6i through a TMB-152 scope riding on an Astro-Physics AP1200GTO mount. This is radically reduced from the original 4000 x 6000-sized image.

Enjoy,
Eric

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Howard Ritter
 

I missed my guess about the significance of the numbers in your screen name! Are you anywhere near Oxford, where I grew up? I’m in the Toledo area now.

—howard

On Nov 19, 2021, at 6:23 PM, eja24601 via groups.io <eja24601@...> wrote:

Thanks, all! This was my first attempt at an HDR composite. Hopefully I can improve my techniques over time. Howard, I live in southwest Ohio. I don't know how VA fared.

Tony, I can relate. I recall being at a dark sky site in NM during one well-placed early morning eclipse, and of course it was clouded over during the event! Fortunately, I was there for a different reason and the eclipse (had I caught it) would have been a bonus.


eja24601
 

Thanks, all! This was my first attempt at an HDR composite. Hopefully I can improve my techniques over time. Howard, I live in southwest Ohio. I don't know how VA fared.

Tony, I can relate. I recall being at a dark sky site in NM during one well-placed early morning eclipse, and of course it was clouded over during the event! Fortunately, I was there for a different reason and the eclipse (had I caught it) would have been a bonus.


Harley Davidson
 

Beautiful image Eric!

All I had was big, huge clouds :(   Wouldn't you know the skies cleared after sunrise.

tony

On 11/19/2021 5:51 PM, eja24601 via groups.io wrote:
November 18 was started off mostly cloudy, but the forecasts (TV meteorologists included) all pointed to clear skies for the eclipse. With that in mind, I got up at 1AM to start preparing for a go at capturing a sequence. Unfortunately, despite forecasts (Astrospheric and the Clear Sky Clock included) for a partly cloudy sky at that time, it was overcast. The Beaver Moon did punch through some sucker holes and thinning layers long enough for me to come to focus with my telescope/camera. However, the clouds stubbornly hung around. 2:30 came and went with no signs of the clouds dispersing. I finally decided to try and nap until 3:30. I tossed and turned restlessly and finally decided to check conditions around 3:20. Lo and behold, the clouds had parted, with the eclipse partway through.

I hurried to our telescope, consoling myself that if I wouldn't be able to capture a sequence, I would at least attempt an HDR composite. Other than a thin cloud that seemed to mock my first attempt at bracketed exposures, the sky remained clear for the rest of the night. I shot a sequence of bracketed exposures all the way through about 5:45AM, so I have a lot of data to play with as I attempt other HDR composites.

In between capturing images, I thought for a change to view the eclipse visually with a scope. Binoculars views were good but shaky (hand-held, no surprise). So I brought out a Borg 76ED and gazed visually. The view with a 15mm TV Plossl was mesmerizing. My HDR composite is a weak attempt at capturing what I saw through the eyepiece.

That said, here is an attempt at an HDR composite of the eclipse near maximum (taken around 4:05AM). This was taken with a Canon Digital Rebel t6i through a TMB-152 scope riding on an Astro-Physics AP1200GTO mount. This is radically reduced from the original 4000 x 6000-sized image.

Enjoy,
Eric


Howard Ritter
 

Very nice capture, Eric. I’ve been hoping that someone in one of the groups I belong to would post a decent HDR image. This is the first I’ve seen. Thanks for posting.

Do you live in western VA? I want to tweak my brother in Lexington (VA) for not bothering to get up to see it if he had the same clearing skies.

—howard

On Nov 19, 2021, at 5:51 PM, eja24601 via groups.io <eja24601@...> wrote:

November 18 was started off mostly cloudy, but the forecasts (TV meteorologists included) all pointed to clear skies for the eclipse. With that in mind, I got up at 1AM to start preparing for a go at capturing a sequence. Unfortunately, despite forecasts (Astrospheric and the Clear Sky Clock included) for a partly cloudy sky at that time, it was overcast. The Beaver Moon did punch through some sucker holes and thinning layers long enough for me to come to focus with my telescope/camera. However, the clouds stubbornly hung around. 2:30 came and went with no signs of the clouds dispersing. I finally decided to try and nap until 3:30. I tossed and turned restlessly and finally decided to check conditions around 3:20. Lo and behold, the clouds had parted, with the eclipse partway through.

I hurried to our telescope, consoling myself that if I wouldn't be able to capture a sequence, I would at least attempt an HDR composite. Other than a thin cloud that seemed to mock my first attempt at bracketed exposures, the sky remained clear for the rest of the night. I shot a sequence of bracketed exposures all the way through about 5:45AM, so I have a lot of data to play with as I attempt other HDR composites.

In between capturing images, I thought for a change to view the eclipse visually with a scope. Binoculars views were good but shaky (hand-held, no surprise). So I brought out a Borg 76ED and gazed visually. The view with a 15mm TV Plossl was mesmerizing. My HDR composite is a weak attempt at capturing what I saw through the eyepiece.

That said, here is an attempt at an HDR composite of the eclipse near maximum (taken around 4:05AM). This was taken with a Canon Digital Rebel t6i through a TMB-152 scope riding on an Astro-Physics AP1200GTO mount. This is radically reduced from the original 4000 x 6000-sized image.

Enjoy,
Eric <MaxEclipse.jpg>


Manusfisch
 

Eric , what a nice blend of colors, The silver gray of the moon really stands out on the left-hand side and blend so nicely with the blood red moon

TJF Mobile

On Nov 19, 2021, at 17:51, eja24601 via groups.io <eja24601@...> wrote:

November 18 was started off mostly cloudy, but the forecasts (TV meteorologists included) all pointed to clear skies for the eclipse. With that in mind, I got up at 1AM to start preparing for a go at capturing a sequence. Unfortunately, despite forecasts (Astrospheric and the Clear Sky Clock included) for a partly cloudy sky at that time, it was overcast. The Beaver Moon did punch through some sucker holes and thinning layers long enough for me to come to focus with my telescope/camera. However, the clouds stubbornly hung around. 2:30 came and went with no signs of the clouds dispersing. I finally decided to try and nap until 3:30. I tossed and turned restlessly and finally decided to check conditions around 3:20. Lo and behold, the clouds had parted, with the eclipse partway through.

I hurried to our telescope, consoling myself that if I wouldn't be able to capture a sequence, I would at least attempt an HDR composite. Other than a thin cloud that seemed to mock my first attempt at bracketed exposures, the sky remained clear for the rest of the night. I shot a sequence of bracketed exposures all the way through about 5:45AM, so I have a lot of data to play with as I attempt other HDR composites.

In between capturing images, I thought for a change to view the eclipse visually with a scope. Binoculars views were good but shaky (hand-held, no surprise). So I brought out a Borg 76ED and gazed visually. The view with a 15mm TV Plossl was mesmerizing. My HDR composite is a weak attempt at capturing what I saw through the eyepiece.

That said, here is an attempt at an HDR composite of the eclipse near maximum (taken around 4:05AM). This was taken with a Canon Digital Rebel t6i through a TMB-152 scope riding on an Astro-Physics AP1200GTO mount. This is radically reduced from the original 4000 x 6000-sized image.

Enjoy,
Eric
<MaxEclipse.jpg>


eja24601
 

November 18 was started off mostly cloudy, but the forecasts (TV meteorologists included) all pointed to clear skies for the eclipse. With that in mind, I got up at 1AM to start preparing for a go at capturing a sequence. Unfortunately, despite forecasts (Astrospheric and the Clear Sky Clock included) for a partly cloudy sky at that time, it was overcast. The Beaver Moon did punch through some sucker holes and thinning layers long enough for me to come to focus with my telescope/camera. However, the clouds stubbornly hung around. 2:30 came and went with no signs of the clouds dispersing. I finally decided to try and nap until 3:30. I tossed and turned restlessly and finally decided to check conditions around 3:20. Lo and behold, the clouds had parted, with the eclipse partway through.

I hurried to our telescope, consoling myself that if I wouldn't be able to capture a sequence, I would at least attempt an HDR composite. Other than a thin cloud that seemed to mock my first attempt at bracketed exposures, the sky remained clear for the rest of the night. I shot a sequence of bracketed exposures all the way through about 5:45AM, so I have a lot of data to play with as I attempt other HDR composites.

In between capturing images, I thought for a change to view the eclipse visually with a scope. Binoculars views were good but shaky (hand-held, no surprise). So I brought out a Borg 76ED and gazed visually. The view with a 15mm TV Plossl was mesmerizing. My HDR composite is a weak attempt at capturing what I saw through the eyepiece.

That said, here is an attempt at an HDR composite of the eclipse near maximum (taken around 4:05AM). This was taken with a Canon Digital Rebel t6i through a TMB-152 scope riding on an Astro-Physics AP1200GTO mount. This is radically reduced from the original 4000 x 6000-sized image.

Enjoy,
Eric