Topics

Planet Tracking and Imaging #APCC #Mach2GTO


Greg Vaughn
 

This is a question for Ray Gralak after watching his July 2016 video about Horizons again.  The question and/or response may be of interest to others as well.

Hi Ray,

in your Horizons video you mention downloading ephemeris data for Mars as an example of what Horizons can be used for - beyond tracking comets.  If I'm going to use the Mach 1 or Mach 2 to image Jupiter, Saturn or Mars, can I download ephemeris data for them in Horizons, do an APPM model and then reasonably expect to be able to track one of the planets with enough precision for good lucky (video) imaging.   Does it make a difference between the Mach 1 or Mach 2.   

I know there are some changes coming with the new keypad software, but the question is for an attempt to image the planets while they are still in my field of view and with a very long effective focal length (~5,700-11,400mm)  - using an 11in Edge HD and a barlow or PowerMate (2X-4X).  Using a ZWO ASI 174 OSC, the image scale would be about .212 to .106 arcsec/pixel while for the ZWO 1600MM it would be .138 to .069 - if I've calculated these correctly.  At any rate, they would need very accurate tracking during the length of the video which for Jupiter would be about 30sec if I remember correctly.

I've been focused on nebulae targets, but would like to shift scopes and catch the planets before they are gone. (I know I'm running a little late already.)

Thanks in advance for any insights from you on how best to leverage APCC for this task and any critiques on my thought process and setup.

Cheers,
Greg

p.s.  I'm limited in my views of the planets to the azimuthal range of about 110-185 deg true, so my APPM model is primarily an East model.


thefamily90 Phillips
 

You do not need superb polar alignment/tracking to image the Moon and Planets. Using a webcam like ZWO and their firecapture software, you just get the image on your laptop screen and as long as you can keep the image somewhere on the screen while imaging(using the keypad at 1X) you have all you need. Then you stack the individual images in Registax or Autostakkert, use wavelets in Registax to sharpen the image and there you have it. Registax or Autostakkert will align the images no matter how much movement there is on the screen. Photoshop to polish it off.

Jim

Image.jpeg


From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> on behalf of Greg Vaughn <gregvaughn@...>
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 11:33:26 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>
Subject: [ap-gto] Planet Tracking and Imaging #Mach2GTO #APCC
 
This is a question for Ray Gralak after watching his July 2016 video about Horizons again.  The question and/or response may be of interest to others as well.

Hi Ray,

in your Horizons video you mention downloading ephemeris data for Mars as an example of what Horizons can be used for - beyond tracking comets.  If I'm going to use the Mach 1 or Mach 2 to image Jupiter, Saturn or Mars, can I download ephemeris data for them in Horizons, do an APPM model and then reasonably expect to be able to track one of the planets with enough precision for good lucky (video) imaging.   Does it make a difference between the Mach 1 or Mach 2.   

I know there are some changes coming with the new keypad software, but the question is for an attempt to image the planets while they are still in my field of view and with a very long effective focal length (~5,700-11,400mm)  - using an 11in Edge HD and a barlow or PowerMate (2X-4X).  Using a ZWO ASI 174 OSC, the image scale would be about .212 to .106 arcsec/pixel while for the ZWO 1600MM it would be .138 to .069 - if I've calculated these correctly.  At any rate, they would need very accurate tracking during the length of the video which for Jupiter would be about 30sec if I remember correctly.

I've been focused on nebulae targets, but would like to shift scopes and catch the planets before they are gone. (I know I'm running a little late already.)

Thanks in advance for any insights from you on how best to leverage APCC for this task and any critiques on my thought process and setup.

Cheers,
Greg

p.s.  I'm limited in my views of the planets to the azimuthal range of about 110-185 deg true, so my APPM model is primarily an East model.


Greg Vaughn
 

Hi Jim,

 

Thanks for your thorough and helpful response.   Your image of Saturn is spectacular and indicates that while I’m following a similar workflow to the one you described, I’m not getting the same kind of results.  Hence the reason I was searching for some improvement.

 

Since your results are so far superior, I’ve sent you a note directly, explaining my challenges in a little more detail and asking you to share some of your secret sauce.

 

Thanks again.

 

Cheers,

Greg

 


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Roland Christen
 

You would not see any motion at 30 seconds for any planet. However, in 30 seconds you will experience rotation on Jupiter, which is something else indeed.

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: Greg Vaughn <gregvaughn@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Jul 31, 2020 10:33 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] Planet Tracking and Imaging #Mach2GTO #APCC

This is a question for Ray Gralak after watching his July 2016 video about Horizons again.  The question and/or response may be of interest to others as well.

Hi Ray,

in your Horizons video you mention downloading ephemeris data for Mars as an example of what Horizons can be used for - beyond tracking comets.  If I'm going to use the Mach 1 or Mach 2 to image Jupiter, Saturn or Mars, can I download ephemeris data for them in Horizons, do an APPM model and then reasonably expect to be able to track one of the planets with enough precision for good lucky (video) imaging.   Does it make a difference between the Mach 1 or Mach 2.   

I know there are some changes coming with the new keypad software, but the question is for an attempt to image the planets while they are still in my field of view and with a very long effective focal length (~5,700-11,400mm)  - using an 11in Edge HD and a barlow or PowerMate (2X-4X).  Using a ZWO ASI 174 OSC, the image scale would be about .212 to .106 arcsec/pixel while for the ZWO 1600MM it would be .138 to .069 - if I've calculated these correctly.  At any rate, they would need very accurate tracking during the length of the video which for Jupiter would be about 30sec if I remember correctly.

I've been focused on nebulae targets, but would like to shift scopes and catch the planets before they are gone. (I know I'm running a little late already.)

Thanks in advance for any insights from you on how best to leverage APCC for this task and any critiques on my thought process and setup.

Cheers,
Greg

p.s.  I'm limited in my views of the planets to the azimuthal range of about 110-185 deg true, so my APPM model is primarily an East model.


thefamily90 Phillips
 

You can go up to 90+ seconds on Jupiter without any recognizable blurring after stacking in Registax.
There is also a derotation ability in an app that lets you go for much much longer periods of time without blurring.

Jim


From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> on behalf of uncarollo2 <chris1011@...> via groups.io <chris1011@...>
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 10:34:18 AM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Planet Tracking and Imaging #Mach2GTO #APCC
 
You would not see any motion at 30 seconds for any planet. However, in 30 seconds you will experience rotation on Jupiter, which is something else indeed.

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: Greg Vaughn <gregvaughn@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Jul 31, 2020 10:33 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] Planet Tracking and Imaging #Mach2GTO #APCC

This is a question for Ray Gralak after watching his July 2016 video about Horizons again.  The question and/or response may be of interest to others as well.

Hi Ray,

in your Horizons video you mention downloading ephemeris data for Mars as an example of what Horizons can be used for - beyond tracking comets.  If I'm going to use the Mach 1 or Mach 2 to image Jupiter, Saturn or Mars, can I download ephemeris data for them in Horizons, do an APPM model and then reasonably expect to be able to track one of the planets with enough precision for good lucky (video) imaging.   Does it make a difference between the Mach 1 or Mach 2.   

I know there are some changes coming with the new keypad software, but the question is for an attempt to image the planets while they are still in my field of view and with a very long effective focal length (~5,700-11,400mm)  - using an 11in Edge HD and a barlow or PowerMate (2X-4X).  Using a ZWO ASI 174 OSC, the image scale would be about .212 to .106 arcsec/pixel while for the ZWO 1600MM it would be .138 to .069 - if I've calculated these correctly.  At any rate, they would need very accurate tracking during the length of the video which for Jupiter would be about 30sec if I remember correctly.

I've been focused on nebulae targets, but would like to shift scopes and catch the planets before they are gone. (I know I'm running a little late already.)

Thanks in advance for any insights from you on how best to leverage APCC for this task and any critiques on my thought process and setup.

Cheers,
Greg

p.s.  I'm limited in my views of the planets to the azimuthal range of about 110-185 deg true, so my APPM model is primarily an East model.


thefamily90 Phillips
 

Reply sent


From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> on behalf of Greg Vaughn <gregvaughn@...>
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 9:59:17 AM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Planet Tracking and Imaging
 

Hi Jim,

 

Thanks for your thorough and helpful response.   Your image of Saturn is spectacular and indicates that while I’m following a similar workflow to the one you described, I’m not getting the same kind of results.  Hence the reason I was searching for some improvement.

 

Since your results are so far superior, I’ve sent you a note directly, explaining my challenges in a little more detail and asking you to share some of your secret sauce.

 

Thanks again.

 

Cheers,

Greg

 


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Greg Vaughn
 

Thanks, Roland.

 

I’ve been watching Christopher Go post his images over the years and have regarded them with a great deal of envy.

 

From a presentation he gave for Woodland Hills, it seems he uses an LRGB approach with a monochrome camera and registers everything using WinJUPOS, which I haven’t used yet.   But when you add up 30 sec for each filter and recognize he takes several groups, it ends up being a healthy amount of time.  (I should probably send this question to him!)

 

However, I thought I had remembered comments posted (by you?) about the planetarium program in the keypad not being quite up to snuff with the latest data for planets. I think it was one of the items that was to be upgraded in the new firmware/software.  My question for Ray was whether uploading ephemeris data for the planets would provide a measurable improvement in the pointing and tracking of the planets at long focal lengths.   And, as a bonus question, how did this play with the APPM modeling – which I believe is principally focused on star pointing and tracking.

 

You can tell we have bad weather here, or otherwise I’d be out there answering these question for myself with some theory to practice evolutions.

 

Thanks in advance for your consideration and thoughts!

 

Best wishes for good health and clear skies!

 

Cheers,

Greg

 

p.s.   I do believe all of my planet imaging issues would be solved with an AP 10” Maksutov-Cassegrain telescope!  I’m sure that that last one in the photos you posted, Roland, has my name on it.  I think, however, during the pandemic you all at AP may have just lost my email and snail mail addresses and misplaced my phone number.  I’m patiently standing by! J J   To be fair, I’m delighted to have received a Mach 2 and have my hands full (when the skies are clear).


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Roland Christen
 

The keypad always had the latest data for planets.
Where it was lacking was in the data for stars which lacked the extra decimal points for the highest precision and also lacked calculations for precession.

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: Greg Vaughn <gregvaughn@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Aug 1, 2020 4:08 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Planet Tracking and Imaging

Thanks, Roland.
 
I’ve been watching Christopher Go post his images over the years and have regarded them with a great deal of envy.
 
From a presentation he gave for Woodland Hills, it seems he uses an LRGB approach with a monochrome camera and registers everything using WinJUPOS, which I haven’t used yet.   But when you add up 30 sec for each filter and recognize he takes several groups, it ends up being a healthy amount of time.  (I should probably send this question to him!)
 
However, I thought I had remembered comments posted (by you?) about the planetarium program in the keypad not being quite up to snuff with the latest data for planets. I think it was one of the items that was to be upgraded in the new firmware/software.  My question for Ray was whether uploading ephemeris data for the planets would provide a measurable improvement in the pointing and tracking of the planets at long focal lengths.   And, as a bonus question, how did this play with the APPM modeling – which I believe is principally focused on star pointing and tracking.
 
You can tell we have bad weather here, or otherwise I’d be out there answering these question for myself with some theory to practice evolutions.
 
Thanks in advance for your consideration and thoughts!
 
Best wishes for good health and clear skies!
 
Cheers,
Greg
 
p.s.   I do believe all of my planet imaging issues would be solved with an AP 10” Maksutov-Cassegrain telescope!  I’m sure that that last one in the photos you posted, Roland, has my name on it.  I think, however, during the pandemic you all at AP may have just lost my email and snail mail addresses and misplaced my phone number.  I’m patiently standing by! J J   To be fair, I’m delighted to have received a Mach 2 and have my hands full (when the skies are clear).

Virus-free. www.avast.com