Comet Neowise


Roland Christen
 

https://www.astrobin.com/full/xjomop/0/

Imaged with the 160EDF refractor on the Mach2 mount. The comet head was tracked using the Keypad Drift Model. I took one data point on the comet's nucleus (a 4 minute drift measurement), then turned on the Model to begin tracking the comet. I took a total of 40 images of 30 sec each thru LRGB filters over a period of about 1/2 hour until the comet dropped below my observatory walls. The background stars moved approximately 1/2 way across the frame during that time while the comet stayed stationary on the chip. Seeing was good but transparency was unfortunately poor with thin high clouds.

Tracking comets can be done two ways, with APCC Horizons and now with the keypad custom model. Using Horizons with emphemeris data takes a bit of doing, and is suited for permanent setups. The keypad drift model is very quick and quite accurate and can be done in a field setup in just minutes.

Roland


Stuart <stuart.j.heggie@...>
 

Simply amazing!!!


On Thu, 23 Jul 2020 at 22:32, uncarollo2 <chris1011@...> via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

Imaged with the 160EDF refractor on the Mach2 mount. The comet head was tracked using the Keypad Drift Model. I took one data point on the comet's nucleus (a 4 minute drift measurement), then turned on the Model to begin tracking the comet. I took a total of 40 images of 30 sec each thru LRGB filters over a period of about 1/2 hour until the comet dropped below my observatory walls. The background stars moved approximately 1/2 way across the frame during that time while the comet stayed stationary on the chip. Seeing was good but transparency was unfortunately poor with thin high clouds.

Tracking comets can be done two ways, with APCC Horizons and now with the keypad custom model. Using Horizons with emphemeris data takes a bit of doing, and is suited for permanent setups. The keypad drift model is very quick and quite accurate and can be done in a field setup in just minutes.

Roland


--

Stuart
http://www.astrofoto.ca/stuartheggie/


Chris Carlton
 

A remarkable image indeed! Perhaps Roland can use his maths skills to calculate the width of the small outgassing core at the approx. distance of 100ish million miles distance from us. Should be possible to figure out with the known image scale. 

--

Chris Carlton, Ph. D.

Director, Carlton Astronomy Campus

Professor of Entomology, Emeritus

Department of Entomology, Louisiana State University

Baton Rouge, LA USA 70808

<a href=http://www.cleardarksky.com/c/CrAstCmpMSkey.html>


Andrea Lucchetti
 

Great image.
APCC/ Horizons is not that complex to use in a field set up, in my opinion.
I have been able to use it last week with my mach2, and it was the first time I powered up the mount :-)

You do need to be keen on setting parameters, I have spent  half an hour because I didn't update the location in the NASA website.
this is something that we can do in advance of the session, because the "tracking plan "can be saved". 
 
So I think we just have two methods also for field use, and it is great!
Andrea


DFisch
 

Andrea as a neophyte I would love to hear more of your prelim “tracking plan” workflow. Tom Fischer, INdy

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 06:51 Andrea Lucchetti <andlucchett@...> wrote:
Great image.
APCC/ Horizons is not that complex to use in a field set up, in my opinion.
I have been able to use it last week with my mach2, and it was the first time I powered up the mount :-)

You do need to be keen on setting parameters, I have spent  half an hour because I didn't update the location in the NASA website.
this is something that we can do in advance of the session, because the "tracking plan "can be saved". 
 
So I think we just have two methods also for field use, and it is great!
Andrea

--
TJF MOBILE


Andrea Lucchetti
 

Tom, I can't check here but it is something I realized while imaging.

First you connect to the NASA site and set the query as illustrated in the manual.
Of course you need to select the right object AND the right observing location (this is the point I missed).
In this regard, the explanatory text in the Horizon application could be more precise.
You also set the time window to cover the days you need.
After running the calculations, you copy/paste in Horizon panel and the Ephemeris values get populated.

From now you have different options in the lower right end part of the application:
you can test the tracking, track the target, or save the data for a later use.
In this way you can prepare everything ahead of time and using it later even without a connection.
I haven't really tried this because I was already there, but I am pretty sure it works.

PS: if you get the message: impossible to track because object is below the horizon, just check your location is not Mars or other funny place :-)

Andrea

Il giorno ven 24 lug 2020 alle ore 13:03 DFisch <manusfisch@...> ha scritto:
Andrea as a neophyte I would love to hear more of your prelim “tracking plan” workflow. Tom Fischer, INdy

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 06:51 Andrea Lucchetti <andlucchett@...> wrote:
Great image.
APCC/ Horizons is not that complex to use in a field set up, in my opinion.
I have been able to use it last week with my mach2, and it was the first time I powered up the mount :-)

You do need to be keen on setting parameters, I have spent  half an hour because I didn't update the location in the NASA website.
this is something that we can do in advance of the session, because the "tracking plan "can be saved". 
 
So I think we just have two methods also for field use, and it is great!
Andrea

--
TJF MOBILE


DFisch
 

Brilliant Andrea and thanks so much for that  “breadcrumb” trail, the option “save data for later use” escaped me, now back on track, Glad you were enjoying your new Mach2! Thanks again, Tom

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 07:25 Andrea Lucchetti <andlucchett@...> wrote:
Tom, I can't check here but it is something I realized while imaging.

First you connect to the NASA site and set the query as illustrated in the manual.
Of course you need to select the right object AND the right observing location (this is the point I missed).
In this regard, the explanatory text in the Horizon application could be more precise.
You also set the time window to cover the days you need.
After running the calculations, you copy/paste in Horizon panel and the Ephemeris values get populated.

From now you have different options in the lower right end part of the application:
you can test the tracking, track the target, or save the data for a later use.
In this way you can prepare everything ahead of time and using it later even without a connection.
I haven't really tried this because I was already there, but I am pretty sure it works.

PS: if you get the message: impossible to track because object is below the horizon, just check your location is not Mars or other funny place :-)

Andrea

Il giorno ven 24 lug 2020 alle ore 13:03 DFisch <manusfisch@...> ha scritto:
Andrea as a neophyte I would love to hear more of your prelim “tracking plan” workflow. Tom Fischer, INdy

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 06:51 Andrea Lucchetti <andlucchett@...> wrote:
Great image.
APCC/ Horizons is not that complex to use in a field set up, in my opinion.
I have been able to use it last week with my mach2, and it was the first time I powered up the mount :-)

You do need to be keen on setting parameters, I have spent  half an hour because I didn't update the location in the NASA website.
this is something that we can do in advance of the session, because the "tracking plan "can be saved". 
 
So I think we just have two methods also for field use, and it is great!
Andrea

--
TJF MOBILE

--
TJF MOBILE


Eric Claeys
 

Roland,
Nice picture of the comet.  Are the light streaks at about a 45 degree angle stars?
Eric


Roland Christen
 

Yes, the very faint streaks are caused by stars that moved with respect to the comet during that 1/2 hour period. The individual LRGB exposures were median combined which suppressed the star streaks to an extent, but not totally.

Back when we used film exposures to image comets it was common to see large numbers of bright star streaks on the image. It looked like the comet was racing thru a snow storm. I have several superb prints done by Tony Hallas of comets that he photographed with 4x5 inch film at 1 hour exposures that were guided by hand or with the original ST4 autoguider system.

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: Eric Claeys <AstroEric@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Jul 24, 2020 9:46 am
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Comet Neowise

Roland,
Nice picture of the comet.  Are the light streaks at about a 45 degree angle stars?
Eric


Robert Chozick <rchozick@...>
 

I got some images of the comet at my favorite dark sky site.  I took 10-2 minute, 10-1 minute and 10-20 second images.  I was surprised that the 20 second images were the best.

https://pbase.com/rchozick/image/170903334

Robert Chozick
Robert Chozick




 

beautiful - nice rendition


On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 1:23 PM Robert Chozick via groups.io <rchozick=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I got some images of the comet at my favorite dark sky site.  I took 10-2 minute, 10-1 minute and 10-20 second images.  I was surprised that the 20 second images were the best.

https://pbase.com/rchozick/image/170903334

Robert Chozick
Robert Chozick





--
Brian 



Brian Valente


Robert Chozick <rchozick@...>
 

Thanks Brian.


On Jul 25, 2020, at 3:37 PM, Brian Valente <bvalente@...> wrote:

beautiful - nice rendition

On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 1:23 PM Robert Chozick via groups.io <rchozick=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I got some images of the comet at my favorite dark sky site.  I took 10-2 minute, 10-1 minute and 10-20 second images.  I was surprised that the 20 second images were the best.

https://pbase.com/rchozick/image/170903334

Robert Chozick
Robert Chozick







--
Brian 



Brian Valente

Robert Chozick