600gto for astrophotography


Stephen E. Russell <sjruss55@...>
 

Hello fellow astrophotographers,
I've the 6oogto with 130f6 and use a 60mm guide scope combo. I'm new at
this game and have only tried 15 min. shots so far. I'm using the
wooden tripod for now. When I move up to the 155f7 EDFS I understand
the 900 would be a much more stable platform. To get the most out of
the 6oo mount I will get the pier. AP is sold out of 48in piers for a
couple of months, so I was wondering if anybody is using the 54in pier
with the 600gto/155f7 combo? I'm 6ft tall, but wonder if the 54in pier
will be too tall?
Assuming only 35mm format and lets say winds no more than 5mph, what is
your definition of casual vs. serious astrophotgraphy limits? I'm sure
I fall into the casual catagory since more than 75% of my time is
visual. If I have the paitence I would like to work my way up to 60min.
manually guided shots.
Can I get by with the 60mm guide scope with the 155 for manual guiding?
I would appreciate any comments on this setup.
Stephen


Bob Luffel <bluffel@...>
 

A 60mm guidescope can certainly work for manual guiding, though my preference
has been 80mm. I prefer to select a guidestar that is within the
field of the image, to minimize the chances of field rotation (good polar
alignment is important). An 80mm just gives you a brighter selection of stars,
at a high enough magnification (200X or higher) to make guiding easier.

In any case, a 60mm guidescope is pretty cheap and you can always upgrade later.


Bob Luffel


Hello fellow astrophotographers,
I've the 6oogto with 130f6 and use a 60mm guide scope combo. I'm new at
this game and have only tried 15 min. shots so far. I'm using the
wooden tripod for now. When I move up to the 155f7 EDFS I understand
the 900 would be a much more stable platform. To get the most out of
the 6oo mount I will get the pier. AP is sold out of 48in piers for a
couple of months, so I was wondering if anybody is using the 54in pier
with the 600gto/155f7 combo? I'm 6ft tall, but wonder if the 54in pier
will be too tall?
Assuming only 35mm format and lets say winds no more than 5mph, what is
your definition of casual vs. serious astrophotgraphy limits? I'm sure
I fall into the casual catagory since more than 75% of my time is
visual. If I have the paitence I would like to work my way up to 60min.
manually guided shots.
Can I get by with the 60mm guide scope with the 155 for manual guiding?
I would appreciate any comments on this setup.
Stephen


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Bobby Middleton <bobm@...>
 

I'm speaking a bit out-of-turn here because I don't use guidescopes only
off-axis guiders; but you should do just fine with the 60mm guidescope. The
glory of the guidescope is its ability to be tweeked independently of the
imaging scope. So the smaller apreture shouldn't ever be a problem since you
will have so much flexability in finding guidestars.
Bobby Middleton

http://www.koyote.com/users/bobm/astro1.htm

Assuming only 35mm format and lets say winds no more than 5mph, what is
your definition of casual vs. serious astrophotgraphy limits? I'm sure
I fall into the casual catagory since more than 75% of my time is
visual. If I have the paitence I would like to work my way up to 60min.
manually guided shots.
Can I get by with the 60mm guide scope with the 155 for manual guiding?
I would appreciate any comments on this setup.
Stephen


Bob Luffel <bluffel@...>
 

Sounds like you have it well in hand already.

I use a Celestron (vixen) 80mm f/11 and ST4 with my 155EDF.
At f/11 I generally have had no problem finding suitable guidestars within
the field. I like to have a bright enough star so I can keep the ST4 exposures
at or below 1 second. Assuming that your 60mm guidescope is f/11 it should
work just as well, just at a shorter focal length (but with the 130 f/6 you
will have a similar guidescope/mainscope focal length relationship).

Enjoy the manual guiding! I used to be more of a 'purist' and manually
guided, but I got used to auto guiding surprisingly fast :-) (still, the
set up time and hassles are the same for autoguiding and manual guiding).
What the ST4 really bought me is the ability to do something (like observe)
while taking an exposure. That is what my Traveler gets used a lot for (as
a second scope to use while the 155 is humming away).

Oh yeah, one more thing I learned. Stick with simple guidescope rings, they
work well. I once tried a Tak TGM-2 guidescope stage (basically a teegul
mount). It flexed like crazy and was actually a pain to use (lots of shift
in the axis' when adjusting).


Bob


Hi Bob,

I bought that 60mm GS from AP three years ago for the SDF and 130. With a
Tak 5mm Guide eyepiece, I'm at 140x, which does begin to get dim for
guiding. I'll try to keep within the FOV AMAP, good tip. The 140x works out
to be about 5x the focal length in inches with the 130f6, so it looks like I
should use 200+ with the 155f7. May have to upgrade as you say.

For all you ST4 users, isn't the 60mm GS adequate for autoguiding for 155f7?
Eventually I'll have to get one, but I want to experience the pain of manual
guiding for now anyway.

Thanks, Stephen



A 60mm guidescope can certainly work for manual guiding, though my
preference
has been 80mm. I prefer to select a guidestar that is within the
field of the image, to minimize the chances of field rotation (good polar
alignment is important). An 80mm just gives you a brighter selection of
stars,
at a high enough magnification (200X or higher) to make guiding easier.

In any case, a 60mm guidescope is pretty cheap and you can always upgrade
later.


Bob Luffel



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DPMESSIER@...
 

In a message dated 3/17/2000 2:38:25 PM Eastern Standard Time,
sjruss55@dpc.net writes:

Time
to bring out the stepstool for the shorter observers would solve the
horizon
problem, except when they grab on the diagonal to get their balance. I
don't
have any future plans for a shorter scope, if so then I will have to use
the
tripod. Even if I buy the 54in pier, maybe you can just buy the center
section only.
Stephen
Stephen,
Yes you can buy the pier post only. I have a 900GTO and a 54" pier and
bought a 42" pier section with tension rods. You probably could get away
with only one set of rods, depending on the heights. I plan on using the 54"
pier with a refractor and the 42" pier with a SCT.

Dave Messier

David P. Messier
http://members.aol.com/dpmessier/


Paul Gustafson <drgus@...>
 

I've the 6oogto with 130f6 and use a 60mm guide scope combo. I'm new at
this game and have only tried 15 min. shots so far. I'm using the
wooden tripod for now. When I move up to the 155f7 EDFS I understand
the 900 would be a much more stable platform. To get the most out of
the 6oo mount I will get the pier. AP is sold out of 48in piers for a
couple of months, so I was wondering if anybody is using the 54in pier
with the 600gto/155f7 combo? I'm 6ft tall, but wonder if the 54in pier
will be too tall?
I'm 6'2" tall and use the 155 EDFS/900GTO combo (a little taller than the
600, I believe) on the 54" pier. I can view to the horizon standing and can
view at the zenith without crawling on my knees. It's quite doable, but if
you have any observing friends any shorter, it will be too tall when viewing
near the horizon. And you won't be doing much viewing seated. If you plan on
using a shorter scope on the mount/pier combo, I'd go for the 48". Since I
will be using a C-11 and a Mak-Cass on mine, I am going to sell the 54" and
go to a 48".

Gus


Stephen E. Russell <sjruss55@...>
 

Hi Gus,
Thanks for the input. I figured that most folks use the 48in pier. I set up
my tripod at 54in with the 130f6 to get a feel for it. Crawling on my knees
and trying to guide manually is uncomfortable. Maybe easier to stand, I
guess you need to choose objects that allow you to sit is the key, easier
said than done. Even though the 155f7 is longer, the guidescope still will
remain at the same position, so I need to consider this some more. I can
see where the 80mm GS would be easier to use just because it is longer. Time
to bring out the stepstool for the shorter observers would solve the horizon
problem, except when they grab on the diagonal to get their balance. I don't
have any future plans for a shorter scope, if so then I will have to use the
tripod. Even if I buy the 54in pier, maybe you can just buy the center
section only.
Stephen

I'm 6'2" tall and use the 155 EDFS/900GTO combo (a little taller than the
600, I believe) on the 54" pier. I can view to the horizon standing and can
view at the zenith without crawling on my knees. It's quite doable, but if
you have any observing friends any shorter, it will be too tall when
viewing
near the horizon. And you won't be doing much viewing seated. If you plan
on
using a shorter scope on the mount/pier combo, I'd go for the 48". Since I
will be using a C-11 and a Mak-Cass on mine, I am going to sell the 54" and
go to a 48".

Gus


Stephen E. Russell <sjruss55@...>
 

Hi Dave,
I'll give AP a call to get the details on the tension rods.
Thanks, thought you interchange the piers since legs were the same.

Stephen




Stephen,
Yes you can buy the pier post only. I have a 900GTO and a 54" pier and
bought a 42" pier section with tension rods. You probably could get away
with only one set of rods, depending on the heights. I plan on using the
54"
pier with a refractor and the 42" pier with a SCT.

Dave Messier


Paul Gustafson <drgus@...>
 

Even if I buy the 54in pier, maybe you can just buy the center
section only.
AP said I could buy the 48" pier only (the base, legs, and tension rods are
the same), and a new set of turnbuckles to use with my current tension rods.
Roland said with their 10" Mak-Cass on a 900, the 48" pier was just right.

Gus


Stephen E. Russell <sjruss55@...>
 

Hi Bob,

I bought that 60mm GS from AP three years ago for the SDF and 130. With a
Tak 5mm Guide eyepiece, I'm at 140x, which does begin to get dim for
guiding. I'll try to keep within the FOV AMAP, good tip. The 140x works out
to be about 5x the focal length in inches with the 130f6, so it looks like I
should use 200+ with the 155f7. May have to upgrade as you say.

For all you ST4 users, isn't the 60mm GS adequate for autoguiding for 155f7?
Eventually I'll have to get one, but I want to experience the pain of manual
guiding for now anyway.

Thanks, Stephen



A 60mm guidescope can certainly work for manual guiding, though my
preference
has been 80mm. I prefer to select a guidestar that is within the
field of the image, to minimize the chances of field rotation (good polar
alignment is important). An 80mm just gives you a brighter selection of
stars,
at a high enough magnification (200X or higher) to make guiding easier.

In any case, a 60mm guidescope is pretty cheap and you can always upgrade
later.


Bob Luffel


Stephen E. Russell <sjruss55@...>
 

Hi Bobby,
Thats exactly why I bought the guidescope.
Thanks for the response.
Stephen



I'm speaking a bit out-of-turn here because I don't use guidescopes only
off-axis guiders; but you should do just fine with the 60mm guidescope. The
glory of the guidescope is its ability to be tweeked independently of the
imaging scope. So the smaller apreture shouldn't ever be a problem since
you
will have so much flexability in finding guidestars.
Bobby Middleton


Stephen E. Russell <sjruss55@...>
 

Thanks for the info. Gus, looks like the best of both worlds.
Stephen

-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Gustafson <drgus@erols.com>
To: ap-gto@egroups.com <ap-gto@egroups.com>
Date: Friday, March 17, 2000 2:08 PM
Subject: [ap-gto] Re: 600gto for astrophotography


Even if I buy the 54in pier, maybe you can just buy the center
section only.
AP said I could buy the 48" pier only (the base, legs, and tension rods are
the same), and a new set of turnbuckles to use with my current tension
rods.
Roland said with their 10" Mak-Cass on a 900, the 48" pier was just right.

Gus


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