OFF TOPIC - remote PC & TeamViewer Home Use version - Times out


Michael Buxton
 

I use TightVNC and it is free.  TV is my backup.  It is a good alternative and it does not timeout.  It requires some knowledge with port forwarding if you have a firewall though.

Mike


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone


Joe Zeglinski
 

Thanks Mike,
 
    I may have to eventually go with VNC,  if this TeamViewer connection “randomness” doesn’t get resolved.
VNC is probably the second most common remote support package out there, and indeed the TeamViewer website “compares itself (briefly) to VNC – claiming only that TV doesn’t have the need for “port forwarding”, so it is easier to configure.
 
    I also thank Ray, for suggesting RADMIN. Can’t beat the $49 (version) lifetime license, compared to over $800 for a Commercial (non-timeout plagued version) of TeamViewer.  As I recall from RADMIN website, the standard version is for 3 client connections, which should suffice the average telescope setup from a couple of PC’s. Besides, can’t get better recommendation,  than its being used by Ray Gralak. I may dedicate RADMIN for astronomy, and continue wit TeamViewer for more mundane family PC remote support.
 
    I would prefer that TeamViewer would not have the “randomness” – I could just about live with the 3-hour cut-off, for the free version. TV is nice for quick and easy support of remote family and friend computers, since they can download and install it themselves, without any technical “port forwarding” expertise. It is probably why many or most,  large computer software companies use it and have customers download TV to solve a problem, with them on-line. Of course, these software companies will have their own TV name  “rebranded” versions for the download, but it is still TeamViewer inside, something every user can become comfortable using themselves. It is also easy to download at say, a friend’s house, and immediately log into one’s,  already running telescope session, just to check up on CCD imaging progress,  while away on a dinner visit, for example.
 
*******
BTW:
    For those using TeamViewer, (in EXTRAS->log files)  the “Connections_incoming.txt” log file is interesting – a log listing the  incoming host PC name, its TV ID-number, and Session connect/disconnect times.
Unfortunately this log seems to use UT-Time, while the other, far more detailed and complex,  “TeamViewer11.log”  activity file uses Local Time, so beware of the difference. They should have just used a single time standard for all logs to sync up the activities reports. The connections log is helpful in examining, perhaps by importing into a spreadsheet and its graphing,  to see just how long a session lasted, before being shut down or lost, over weeks or months of telescope use.
********
    Last night – strictly JUST for “fun” – while debugging my TeamViewer system, I wanted to see  how many client connections could be “CASCADED” to each other,  connecting sessions to the Scope PC. So, I connected as client from one home (client) laptop to my Scope (host) PC. Then I went to a second PC, and connected to the first “client PC” which was already operating the scope remotely. I was surprised that I now saw the Scope window inside the first client window, on my (second) client PC window – “a picture, in a picture, in a picture”, if you like.
 
    Next,  I wondered if this client -  remoting the former two - could actually still “CONTROL” the Scope PC (via the initial client). Sure enough, my mouse controlled the Scope PC mouse position – I still had control, two client PC’s down the lane. In fact, I was even more surprised, that this second client’s Windows clipboard was also connected to the Scope PC clipboard. I could copy something saved to my distant client clipboard, and paste it directly, on the remote Scope PC screen (file name, text into a WordPad doc.  etc). Wow !
 
*****
    Going for broke ... I clicked on the TeamViewer icon on that Scope window and made yet a THIRD connection ... “Right back to myself”,  the second client – a Closed Loop connection. Talk about “Screen Art” – there was suddenly a cascade of hundreds of copies of  ALL the client screens, ever decreasing in size into a “naked singularity”. The effect was like viewing an object set between two mirrors facing each other – infinite number of  projections. At first I thought I really broke my PC graphics card this time, and would need to Shutdown Windows – but the effect was easy to close, by simply clicking the red-X on the “outermost” TV session window, to disconnect from the first client PC session.
 
    As I said ... just for fun – and to see just how tolerant TeamViewer software could be.  ... Very Powerful program !
Normally I might “DIRECTLY” log into the Scope control PC, from a second client – but I wonder how the APCC would know where commands are coming from, the first or second client simultaneous session, and would the AP Mount’s CPx controller get muddled by two dual access sources. But that is for another day.
******
 
    So ... Right now I am still desperately trying to resolve the simple host/client connection problem. Possibilities include:
-----
  1. Bug in TeamViewer – connection code ... (perhaps less likely).
  2. The Linksys WRT-610N “Simultaneous Dual Band Router ... may have a varying signal quality, and may sometimes, be “HUNTING for the best Frequency Band in the middle of a session. So, the TV app quickly (and impatiently), sends out its own Session Disconnect,  when it first sees some momentary dropouts. A direct cable connection to both Scope and Client PC’s should disprove the “wobbly wireless LAN” possibility.
  3. Perhaps my ISP was overly busy, heavy cable traffic, Modem signal momentarily dropping out, before most of their customers logged out and went to bed. The PC’s win-10 never even flickered, so Windows may be more tolerant.
  4. WIN-10 doing too many “Self Diagnostics and System Clean-ups”. There was a flurry of disconnects last night, (as usual), just before midnight. TV would not accept a reconnect that lasted longer than just a few seconds at a time. After midnight, it seemed to last for over one hour. Unlike Win-7, these MICROSOFT diagnostics schedules, Defrag, Memory Test, File & Security, etc. and others  of various kinds are now encoded as  “CUSTOM” , and can’t be rescheduled by the user,  to more appropriate ...  Daytime hours.
  5. Differences in operating system activity – I can retest later,  using Win-7 on the same client PC.
    I have learned a lot about choosing and using a remote app, during these conversations.
Sorry if this thread has lasted longer than perhaps some expected. Thanks for your patience with this OT posting.
But, I feel the choice of an easy to use, common, reliable and inexpensive Remote session application program,  is important to operating our Astro-Physics mounts, safely.
 
My thanks to Joel, Mike, and Ray, for your added information and advice thus far.
Back to debugging.
Joe Z.
 


Michael
 

I will offer a different suggestion to try - I use Splashtop Personal. It's free and has worked well for me for years. I can control my observatory computer from the house with my office PC, iPad, or iPhone. I don't leave it running all night, but just pop on and off as needed to see how the observatory computer is doing. It doesn't log off the observatory computer so it purrs happily, but I can control the computer if needed.


Mike


Joe Zeglinski
 

Thanks Mike –
 
    Does “SPLASHTOP PERSONAL” ...  keep both local and remote screens etc., fully and simultaneously displayed ?
Microsoft Remote Desktop (RDP) always required the user to log back into the running session on Windows Pro and higher. It acts as if a “Switch User” command has been initiated, with the initial session then moved to running in background, but hidden and inaccessible until switching back with a login. You would think Microsoft, with all its in-house smarts, would have fixed that, decades ago.
 
    I need to be able to get to the session screen without the delays of fumbling in the dark, logging in again, just to see the active session screen, when there is a panic situation with my AP mount about to collide.
 
Joe


John Gleason
 

I have been using the Teamviewer free version for about 3 years with few disconnection problems.  That's remote from California to Australia. Where in Australia we have a less than optimal connections via satellite. (A possum once chewed though a connection). TV hardly ever drops out compared to Logmein which wants to drop about every 2 to 3 hours or so.  Sometimes LMI drops frequently. I will fine TV fully functional in those cases. We are sometimes limited by bandpass, so if I run at maximum screen resolutions to look at fine data, both TV and LMI will kick out pretty quickly. Mainly just monitor at lowest color res after initial setup. 


 No experience with the others, but much I think depends on the connection and the service at the remote PC in my personal experience.  Neither TV or LMI has any problem when managing the PC at the telescope in my backyard.


   


Michael
 

Joe

The remote computer will be unchanged (although a little message bubble comes up saying that it's now being controlled by another window). There is a setting in Splashtop where you can choose to have it log out (like a switch user) but I turn that off. I don't need to fumble with anything. It's a nice little package.


Mike


Joe Zeglinski
 

Hi (dvj),
 
    That’s interesting – I wonder why TeamViewer sometimes “forgets” that it is running the FREE version - limited to 3 hour connection before forcing a disconnect. I think that has also happened to me, once or twice. I think the first run after install doesn’t setup the 3 hour cut-off, in its parameters,  until that initial session has ended.
 
    Please see (below) the email I received from TeamViewer confirming this whole issue of how long a free session keeps its connection.
 
Joe
 
**** From TeamViewer *****
 
Dear Sir or Madam,

Thank you very much for your message.

The   FREE version   of TeamViewer has a   “three-hour limit”    on its connections.
This means each session will be disconnected after three hours. However you can always establish a new connection again immediately afterwards.

Please note that  “LICENSED versions”  of TeamViewer do NOT have any time limit on their connections.
If you have a need for unlimited connections, please consider purchasing a license. We will be happy to discuss our licensing options with you and give you a personalized quotation.

If you have any further questions about TeamViewer, please feel free to contact us again.

Best regards,

Ryan Zhang
----------------------------------------------------------
TeamViewer Pty Ltd *
www.teamviewer.com
Asia Pacific Headquarters, Adelaide, AUSTRALIA
 


ayiomamitis
 

Gents,

I have been following this thread with great interest.

Speaking of TeamViewer, it is something I tried a few years ago when I wanted to transfer a few gig of data from one laptop to another. It was interesting to note that I had my ability for file transfers immediately cut thereafter and, I suspect, the 10 Gb of data involved in the transfer did me in. As an aside, FileZilla is one incredible piece of software for such matters involving a local network (it is also freeware).

Question for the group: of the various pieces of software suggested in this thread, which one has the least overhead with respect to slowing down the remote computer due to CPU, RAM etc when the software is active on it?

Anthony.

On 5/3/2016 18:28, 'Joseph Zeglinski' J.Zeglinski@... [ap-gto] wrote:
 

Hi (dvj),
 
    That’s interesting – I wonder why TeamViewer sometimes “forgets” that it is running the FREE version - limited to 3 hour connection before forcing a disconnect. I think that has also happened to me, once or twice. I think the first run after install doesn’t setup the 3 hour cut-off, in its parameters,  until that initial session has ended.
 
    Please see (below) the email I received from TeamViewer confirming this whole issue of how long a free session keeps its connection.
 
Joe
 
**** From TeamViewer *****
 
Dear Sir or Madam,

Thank you very much for your message.

The   FREE version   of TeamViewer has a   “three-hour limit”    on its connections.
This means each session will be disconnected after three hours. However you can always establish a new connection again immediately afterwards.

Please note that  “LICENSED versions”  of TeamViewer do NOT have any time limit on their connections.
If you have a need for unlimited connections, please consider purchasing a license. We will be happy to discuss our licensing options with you and give you a personalized quotation.

If you have any further questions about TeamViewer, please feel free to contact us again.

Best regards,

Ryan Zhang
----------------------------------------------------------
TeamViewer Pty Ltd *
www.teamviewer.com
Asia Pacific Headquarters, Adelaide, AUSTRALIA
 


Stuart Heggie <stuart.j.heggie@...>
 

Anthony, I too am watching this thread with great interest. It seems to me that an early version of TV blocked file-transfer for the free version but this is no longer the case. I routinely use TV to move a gig or more of data from the field behind our farmhouse to the computer IN the farmhouse via a range extender connected to the router and sitting at the back of our deck (in a weather proof plastic box).

Stuart

On Tue, May 3, 2016 at 3:52 PM, Anthony Ayiomamitis ayiomami@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

Gents,

I have been following this thread with great interest.

Speaking of TeamViewer, it is something I tried a few years ago when I wanted to transfer a few gig of data from one laptop to another. It was interesting to note that I had my ability for file transfers immediately cut thereafter and, I suspect, the 10 Gb of data involved in the transfer did me in. As an aside, FileZilla is one incredible piece of software for such matters involving a local network (it is also freeware).

Question for the group: of the various pieces of software suggested in this thread, which one has the least overhead with respect to slowing down the remote computer due to CPU, RAM etc when the software is active on it?

Anthony.

On 5/3/2016 18:28, 'Joseph Zeglinski' J.Zeglinski@... [ap-gto] wrote:
 

Hi (dvj),
 
    That’s interesting – I wonder why TeamViewer sometimes “forgets” that it is running the FREE version - limited to 3 hour connection before forcing a disconnect. I think that has also happened to me, once or twice. I think the first run after install doesn’t setup the 3 hour cut-off, in its parameters,  until that initial session has ended.
 
    Please see (below) the email I received from TeamViewer confirming this whole issue of how long a free session keeps its connection.
 
Joe
 
**** From TeamViewer *****
 
Dear Sir or Madam,

Thank you very much for your message.

The   FREE version   of TeamViewer has a   “three-hour limit”    on its connections.
This means each session will be disconnected after three hours. However you can always establish a new connection again immediately afterwards.

Please note that  “LICENSED versions”  of TeamViewer do NOT have any time limit on their connections.
If you have a need for unlimited connections, please consider purchasing a license. We will be happy to discuss our licensing options with you and give you a personalized quotation.

If you have any further questions about TeamViewer, please feel free to contact us again.

Best regards,

Ryan Zhang
----------------------------------------------------------
TeamViewer Pty Ltd *
www.teamviewer.com
Asia Pacific Headquarters, Adelaide, AUSTRALIA
 





Joe Zeglinski
 

Anthony,
 
    If you have the Free TeamViewer version, do a sample file transfer, and check the worst case slowest transfer speed. Then multiply by (3 x 3600) to approximate your file size limit to can transfer min that 3 hour session limit.
 
    Or, buy the Commercial license for nearly a $1K, and not have a limit. But, that price is unrealistic,  unless you are Microsoft Tech Support (one of TV’s clients, evidently).
 
Joe


ayiomamitis
 

Joe,

File transfers stopped being an issue when I started to use FileZilla. It is a great piece of software and which I highly recommend.

Anthony.

On 5/4/2016 01:09, 'Joseph Zeglinski' J.Zeglinski@... [ap-gto] wrote:
 

Anthony,
 
    If you have the Free TeamViewer version, do a sample file transfer, and check the worst case slowest transfer speed. Then multiply by (3 x 3600) to approximate your file size limit to can transfer min that 3 hour session limit.
 
    Or, buy the Commercial license for nearly a $1K, and not have a limit. But, that price is unrealistic,  unless you are Microsoft Tech Support (one of TV’s clients, evidently).
 
Joe


Michael
 

Anthony


I don't know about Splashtop's resource requirements, but I haven't had an issue with any of the software running on it. I also run Box on the laptop - I save each image in a directory that Box will sync which allows me to pull the files onto my home computer without worrying about transfers, etc. Never had a problem doing that (I've also used Dropbox, but have found that the Dropbox software gets a little wonky from time to time with Windows 10) and I never worry about having to remember to move files.


Mike


kentdegroff@...
 

Except for the paid version, TeamViewer 11 and above have a periodic disconnect built into them on purpose. I use TV 10 and don't have that problem; went back from 11 after having the problem and finding that out. I find it is faster than RealVNC.

Regards,
Kent


Stuart Heggie <stuart.j.heggie@...>
 

Kent, not doubting you but at least in my case, all versions of TV have had the periodic disconnect for me and my use.

Stuart

On Wed, May 4, 2016 at 9:54 PM, kentdegroff@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

Except for the paid version, TeamViewer 11 and above have a periodic disconnect built into them on purpose. I use TV 10 and don't have that problem; went back from 11 after having the problem and finding that out. I find it is faster than RealVNC.

Regards,
Kent





Lance McCartney <macshome@...>
 

Kent, how did you go back to version 10?
 
Thanks,
Lance
 

Sent: Wednesday, May 04, 2016 6:54 PM
Subject: [ap-gto] Re: OFF TOPIC - remote PC & TeamViewer Home Use version - Times out
 
 

Except for the paid version, TeamViewer 11 and above have a periodic disconnect built into them on purpose. I use TV 10 and don't have that problem; went back from 11 after having the problem and finding that out. I find it is faster than RealVNC.

Regards,
Kent


Joe Zeglinski
 

Kent,
 
    Before posting this thread about the TC-11 timeout, I went back to TV –10 and TV-9, and all three (free) versions have the same “random” timeout. By any chance was your TV-10 a “paid” Commercial version, which of course, doesn’t have the timer set for 3 hours? Seems Stuart and I are seeing the same problem – as are very many others on the web, if you Google “TeamViewer disconnects”
 
    Yesterday, in pursuing this issue with TeamViewer’s Tech Support, they suggested trying to UNCHECK  the option in “Advanced Network Settings ... Use UDP (Recommended)” in the Extras-Options-Advanced. Well, the first run timed out in the first few minutes. But, the second session, continued to run for hours. After the 3-hour (free) time limit had passed, I decided to move the optional Timeout slider from 8 hours (max), back down to “OFF”  (No timeout) ... and the strange thing is that it was still running just fine after 10.5 hours – when I finally decided to stop the session, as it was then obvious that it was going to run forever. Somehow the “non-UDP network” option, seemed to confuse TV-11 to ignore the built-in kill switch , for Home users. That, at first, seemed like an enticing bonus for not using UDP, so I will continue with it, as it gives fewer random session disconnects. Hopefully TeamViewer will eventually discover the cause, after so many versions of their software.
 
    Then I switched to another host laptop, expecting this was perhaps a quirk using  Win-XP on the host laptop,  but the same thing happened on a Win-10 host laptop – Session aborted after a few minutes, and the rerun session bombed out after 1 hour 52 minutes, far short of the built-in 3-hour limit.
 
    My tests are currently indoors, with the option set to “Accept LAN” connections – so there is no chance of ISP modem blips or internet traffic jams. However, I suspect TV still uses its internet link – perhaps for monitoring, even as it is running a session with the in-house LAN, ... and the two laptops just 10 inches apart on the table !
 
    TeamViewer session – using any Home User version -  is unpredictable.
When it runs, its great, but when it randomly disconnects, its a royal pain. Still, it is useful, since you can login again. I find it takes 7 to 8 minutes before it accepts a re-login ... while it says it is “Trying to reconnect”. But, if you just CLOSE the session window, you can login again ...  in just a few seconds. I find I might as well do that, since it has “never” managed to reconnect on its own, no matter how hard it is trying. I thought it was a Windows Security issue – not allowing it to login – but XP didn’t have security, and as the host (scope system) PC, it too still failed the same way.
 
Joe


kentdegroff@...
 

Hi Joe,

I must confess I have had occasional random disconnects - very occasional, though, and stuff like that happens with wireless communications from time to time anyway, but the connection is solid, overall. That's from my wireless house desktop through the router to my wireless desktop in the observatory. It's even pretty solid over the internet/laptop from 300 miles away. The biggest bummer would be if a file transfer got interrupted. Probably safer to use Filezilla if random disconnects are a concern.

FYI, in my observatory, I am using Free TeamViewer Version 10.0.47484, "Use UDP" is checked, incoming LAN connections set, strangely, to "deactivated" (I just discovered). But I know it's using the LAN as it is quite fast and my ISP is horribly slow in this rural area (frequently below 1 Mbps). I'll have to check into this one.

I found some interesting threads on the subject (you probably have too). Here's a couple:

http://teamviewerforums.com/index.php?topic=3190.0

 

http://www.techsupportforum.com/forums/f10/teamviewer-1089178.html


Regards,

Kent


Stuart Heggie <stuart.j.heggie@...>
 

Joe, Kent, ... I just wanted to report that as of now I have had a LAN connection of TV 11 running from a 32-bit W7 machine to a 32-bit XP Home machine for about 3 days without interruption. Weird.

Stuart

On Thu, May 5, 2016 at 2:46 AM, 'Joseph Zeglinski' J.Zeglinski@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

Kent,
 
    Before posting this thread about the TC-11 timeout, I went back to TV –10 and TV-9, and all three (free) versions have the same “random” timeout. By any chance was your TV-10 a “paid” Commercial version, which of course, doesn’t have the timer set for 3 hours? Seems Stuart and I are seeing the same problem – as are very many others on the web, if you Google “TeamViewer disconnects”
 
    Yesterday, in pursuing this issue with TeamViewer’s Tech Support, they suggested trying to UNCHECK  the option in “Advanced Network Settings ... Use UDP (Recommended)” in the Extras-Options-Advanced. Well, the first run timed out in the first few minutes. But, the second session, continued to run for hours. After the 3-hour (free) time limit had passed, I decided to move the optional Timeout slider from 8 hours (max), back down to “OFF”  (No timeout) ... and the strange thing is that it was still running just fine after 10.5 hours – when I finally decided to stop the session, as it was then obvious that it was going to run forever. Somehow the “non-UDP network” option, seemed to confuse TV-11 to ignore the built-in kill switch , for Home users. That, at first, seemed like an enticing bonus for not using UDP, so I will continue with it, as it gives fewer random session disconnects. Hopefully TeamViewer will eventually discover the cause, after so many versions of their software.
 
    Then I switched to another host laptop, expecting this was perhaps a quirk using  Win-XP on the host laptop,  but the same thing happened on a Win-10 host laptop – Session aborted after a few minutes, and the rerun session bombed out after 1 hour 52 minutes, far short of the built-in 3-hour limit.
 
    My tests are currently indoors, with the option set to “Accept LAN” connections – so there is no chance of ISP modem blips or internet traffic jams. However, I suspect TV still uses its internet link – perhaps for monitoring, even as it is running a session with the in-house LAN, ... and the two laptops just 10 inches apart on the table !
 
    TeamViewer session – using any Home User version -  is unpredictable.
When it runs, its great, but when it randomly disconnects, its a royal pain. Still, it is useful, since you can login again. I find it takes 7 to 8 minutes before it accepts a re-login ... while it says it is “Trying to reconnect”. But, if you just CLOSE the session window, you can login again ...  in just a few seconds. I find I might as well do that, since it has “never” managed to reconnect on its own, no matter how hard it is trying. I thought it was a Windows Security issue – not allowing it to login – but XP didn’t have security, and as the host (scope system) PC, it too still failed the same way.
 
Joe





Joe Zeglinski
 

Thanks for that update, Kent.
 
    Reading through the forums you provided link to, it is surprising to see the range of (free) session timeouts experience 1, 2 or 3 hours. I suspect some of these are likely loss of WiFi or direct connect router/modem signal, since TeamViewer tech support FINALLY admitted to the 3 hour limit, if all else works. I wonder if the company will finally post that on their web, or in the next version update.
 
    By any chance is your observatory (host) PC running Win-XP?
 
    I found I can get pretty much undisrupted connection to my XP laptop (using any Windows client OS) – with the Session Timeout option, set to OFF -  compared to the random disconnects when talking to my two Win-10 and the Win-7 Pro systems as hosts, all PC’s in the very same room. That imbedded (non-disclosed) 3-hour limit kill switch doesn’t seem to trigger in XP hosted PC’s.  Win-XP wasn’t encumbered by all the later Microsoft security routines, so TV runs far simpler as a host at the telescope.
 
    Also, Win-XP only used IPv4 to handle communications. Win-7 (and later), automatically re-links all existing IPv4 calls (during boot),  to the new IPv6 module, which I suspect may account for some of the “premature” disconnects on weak WiFi and direct connect router signals. I have run a couple of XP hosted sessions, for well over 10 hours each, and  3 hours at most, on Win-7 and later host side TeamViewer systems. I wonder if IPv6 sensitivity to signal dips has been responsible for cases when it started and aborted a session lasting only a few seconds, in a string of a dozen sequential restarts, before it finally stayed connected for a while.
 
    As for your setting the option for option -  “Incoming LAN” ... Deactivate” – that is indeed odd, though from what I have seen, now in weeks of daylong  tests, it is not unexpected. TeamViewer (any version)  isn’t consistent and sometimes looks like it ignores its own User settings. Some settings, based on comments in the log,  can’t actually be activated, depending if it is running on Win-XP, versus the later Windows  systems with their security lockouts.
 
    Click on  the TV Log files option in EXTRAS, and read through the list of sessions in TeamViewer-11_log.txt (requires to be run only with Notepad). You will see lots of system calls, possibly to mostly its own command modules, which fail or produce errors. The date/time tag in that file is your “Local Time”.
 
    Also, have a look at the file “Connections_incoming.txt” – also on the host TeamViewer – to see the start and stop times recorded at the end of each session. Note that the date stamp is in Universal Time (not local time, as in the former log file), which makes comparing events to sessions confusing.
 
    Finally, I repeat, do NOT wait for TV to actually reconnect, after aborting a session – probably more so in Win-7 and later TV host-side, systems. I don’t think the security features in later Windows, permit it to do that, so it wastes time and your patience. Just click the red-X and close the session Window, even as TV is saying it is “Trying to reconnect” – that’s Bogus ... and it will take 8 minutes before it finally hangs. Closing the session window right away and clicking on the TV start icon, only takes a blink of the eye to resume without loss of the former host screen.
 
    From the troubles I have seen, it almost seems like TeamViewer is simply written as a huge JAVA Script, rather than a well programmed compiler or even assembler based program.
 
Joe


Joe Zeglinski
 

Stuart,
 
    Just as I suspected – XP on the telescope side, as host, will run as long as there is a decent signal, no Timeout.
 
    As a further test, try what I did. Reverse the TeamViewer roles – go to the observatory “Win-XP”  computer, and log into the Win-7 or 10  PC in the house which then becomes the TV host. I suspect your XP (or any other Win O/S as client), will timeout at the 3 hour mark, or sooner if the  IPv6 comms.  driver doesn’t like signal quality. The house Win-7/10 system will continue running, oblivious of the disconnect, other than a note in Connections_incoming.txt (on the host side’s TeamViewer) log file.
 
    Bottom line, it seems that only TeamViewer XP-based “hosts” will not time out.
Joe