Drift method question


jimhp29401us
 

OK, so I don't know what the heck I am doing.

Hopefully one of you can help me.


I have my AP 1200 mount set up as best I can. Cannot see the N star from where the scope is located. When on or near the Meridian Saturn is drifting South.

While imaging I am working the button on the hand controller like a computer game. :^)


Any help would be greatly appreciated!


best,


Jim Phillips


topboxman
 

Operating manuals for A-P mounts describe different methods for polar alignment. Did you read the manuals?

My preferred method is Quick Star Drift Alignment using finderscope. See page 6 of:

http://www.astro-physics.com/tech_support/mounts/keypad_v417.pdf

For other polar alignment methods, see page 19 of:

http://www.astro-physics.com/tech_support/mounts/keypad_v412.pdf

Peter


---In ap-gto@..., <thefamily90@...> wrote :

OK, so I don't know what the heck I am doing.

Hopefully one of you can help me.


I have my AP 1200 mount set up as best I can. Cannot see the N star from where the scope is located. When on or near the Meridian Saturn is drifting South.

While imaging I am working the button on the hand controller like a computer game. :^)


Any help would be greatly appreciated!


best,


Jim Phillips


Stuart Heggie <stuart.j.heggie@...>
 

Jim, if the object is rising when you think you are pointed due South, then you are actually looking East of South (this presupposes that you know which way is up in the eyepiece, harder than it seems when it is dark, you're tired and providing a feast for mosquitos). When you think you are pointed due East and the object is moving North in the eyepiece, it means your mount's polar axis is pointed above the true pole.

Hope this helps.

I have an older AP900GTO (CP2) and can't use APCC but maybe it will do the job. Or PoleAlignMax (I think that is right). TheSkyX will do it for sure if you're using that. It takes images, platesolves them then tells you how to adjust the mount.

Stuart

On Tue, Jun 16, 2015 at 11:02 AM, thefamily90@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

OK, so I don't know what the heck I am doing.

Hopefully one of you can help me.


I have my AP 1200 mount set up as best I can. Cannot see the N star from where the scope is located. When on or near the Meridian Saturn is drifting South.

While imaging I am working the button on the hand controller like a computer game. :^)


Any help would be greatly appreciated!


best,


Jim Phillips





Ross Salinger <rgsalinger@...>
 

Your mount comes with PEMPRO and PEMPRO has a Polar Alignment wizard that seems to work fine for many people including me. The methods in the manual will work but if I were you I would acquire some software that can build a pointing model which can tell you how far off you are after a pointing run by analyzing the size and nature of the errors. Both maxpoint and tpoint (in the sky x) are really good at this. The poor man’s method is to use Alignmaster  which is about $20 but people sometimes have trouble with it because it requires that you have a relatively unobstructed horizon at your disposal. You do need a camera and a computer for all of these so, I’d follow Peter’s advice if you’re a visual observer. I’d also have a RAPAS for times when you might use the mount where you can see Polaris.

 

Rgrds-Ross

 

From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...]
Sent: Tuesday, June 16, 2015 8:15 AM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: [ap-gto] Re: Drift method question

 

 

Operating manuals for A-P mounts describe different methods for polar alignment. Did you read the manuals?

My preferred method is Quick Star Drift Alignment using finderscope. See page 6 of:

http://www.astro-physics.com/tech_support/mounts/keypad_v417.pdf

For other polar alignment methods, see page 19 of:

http://www.astro-physics.com/tech_support/mounts/keypad_v412.pdf

Peter



---In ap-gto@..., <thefamily90@...> wrote :

OK, so I don't know what the heck I am doing.

Hopefully one of you can help me.

 

I have my AP 1200 mount set up as best I can. Cannot see the N star from where the scope is located. When on or near the Meridian Saturn is drifting South.

While imaging I am working the button on the hand controller like a computer game. :^)

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

 

best,

 

Jim Phillips


topboxman
 

Quick Star Drift Alignment using finderscope is darn accurate as well as simple that I can take 30 minutes sub-exposures guided with OAG without issues (as long as 2000mm focal length). This method is not just for visual observing but for imaging as well. I now use RAPAS based on Quick Star Drift Alignment using finderscope from now on.

For the first time use of Quick Star Drift Alignment using finderscope may take up to 30 minutes but repeating this procedure from then on can easily take less than 15 minutes. This can be done long before astronomical dark arrives and you will ready ready for imaging or observing.

Peter


---In ap-gto@..., <rgsalinger@...> wrote :

Your mount comes with PEMPRO and PEMPRO has a Polar Alignment wizard that seems to work fine for many people including me. The methods in the manual will work but if I were you I would acquire some software that can build a pointing model which can tell you how far off you are after a pointing run by analyzing the size and nature of the errors. Both maxpoint and tpoint (in the sky x) are really good at this. The poor man’s method is to use Alignmaster  which is about $20 but people sometimes have trouble with it because it requires that you have a relatively unobstructed horizon at your disposal. You do need a camera and a computer for all of these so, I’d follow Peter’s advice if you’re a visual observer. I’d also have a RAPAS for times when you might use the mount where you can see Polaris.

 

Rgrds-Ross

 

From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...]
Sent: Tuesday, June 16, 2015 8:15 AM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: [ap-gto] Re: Drift method question

 

 

Operating manuals for A-P mounts describe different methods for polar alignment. Did you read the manuals?

My preferred method is Quick Star Drift Alignment using finderscope. See page 6 of:

http://www.astro-physics.com/tech_support/mounts/keypad_v417.pdf

For other polar alignment methods, see page 19 of:

http://www.astro-physics.com/tech_support/mounts/keypad_v412.pdf

Peter



---In ap-gto@..., <thefamily90@...> wrote :

OK, so I don't know what the heck I am doing.

Hopefully one of you can help me.

 

I have my AP 1200 mount set up as best I can. Cannot see the N star from where the scope is located. When on or near the Meridian Saturn is drifting South.

While imaging I am working the button on the hand controller like a computer game. :^)

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

 

best,

 

Jim Phillips


Robert Chozick <rchozick@...>
 

I also cannot see Polaris from my backyard mount. I try to be a minimalist whenever possible. I like the old-fashioned drift alignment method.  All you need is an eyepiece with crosshairs. It is best to use a Barlow to increase the magnification.  I use a digital angle measurement device to approximate the latitude  and then do the drift alignment. There are many references on the Internet to how to do this. The guidelines for how to move the mount are at the site below:


On Jun 16, 2015, at 10:25 AM, Ross Salinger rgsalinger@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:

 

Your mount comes with PEMPRO and PEMPRO has a Polar Alignment wizard that seems to work fine for many people including me. The methods in the manual will work but if I were you I would acquire some software that can build a pointing model which can tell you how far off you are after a pointing run by analyzing the size and nature of the errors. Both maxpoint and tpoint (in the sky x) are really good at this. The poor man’s method is to use Alignmaster  which is about $20 but people sometimes have trouble with it because it requires that you have a relatively unobstructed horizon at your disposal. You do need a camera and a computer for all of these so, I’d follow Peter’s advice if you’re a visual observer. I’d also have a RAPAS for times when you might use the mount where you can see Polaris.

 

Rgrds-Ross

 

From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...]
Sent: Tuesday, June 16, 2015 8:15 AM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: [ap-gto] Re: Drift method question

 

 

Operating manuals for A-P mounts describe different methods for polar alignment. Did you read the manuals?

My preferred method is Quick Star Drift Alignment using finderscope. See page 6 of:

http://www.astro-physics.com/tech_support/mounts/keypad_v417.pdf

For other polar alignment methods, see page 19 of:

http://www.astro-physics.com/tech_support/mounts/keypad_v412.pdf

Peter



---In ap-gto@..., <thefamily90@...> wrote :

OK, so I don't know what the heck I am doing.

Hopefully one of you can help me.

 

I have my AP 1200 mount set up as best I can. Cannot see the N star from where the scope is located. When on or near the Meridian Saturn is drifting South.

While imaging I am working the button on the hand controller like a computer game. :^)

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

 

best,

 

Jim Phillips


Steven
 

PEMPro is the way to go! --- Steve Gallion



On Tuesday, June 16, 2015 10:44 AM, "Robert Chozick rchozick@... [ap-gto]" wrote:


 
I also cannot see Polaris from my backyard mount. I try to be a minimalist whenever possible. I like the old-fashioned drift alignment method.  All you need is an eyepiece with crosshairs. It is best to use a Barlow to increase the magnification.  I use a digital angle measurement device to approximate the latitude  and then do the drift alignment. There are many references on the Internet to how to do this. The guidelines for how to move the mount are at the site below:


On Jun 16, 2015, at 10:25 AM, Ross Salinger rgsalinger@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:

 
Your mount comes with PEMPRO and PEMPRO has a Polar Alignment wizard that seems to work fine for many people including me. The methods in the manual will work but if I were you I would acquire some software that can build a pointing model which can tell you how far off you are after a pointing run by analyzing the size and nature of the errors. Both maxpoint and tpoint (in the sky x) are really good at this. The poor man’s method is to use Alignmaster  which is about $20 but people sometimes have trouble with it because it requires that you have a relatively unobstructed horizon at your disposal. You do need a camera and a computer for all of these so, I’d follow Peter’s advice if you’re a visual observer. I’d also have a RAPAS for times when you might use the mount where you can see Polaris.
 
Rgrds-Ross
 
From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...]
Sent: Tuesday, June 16, 2015 8:15 AM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: [ap-gto] Re: Drift method question
 
 
Operating manuals for A-P mounts describe different methods for polar alignment. Did you read the manuals?

My preferred method is Quick Star Drift Alignment using finderscope. See page 6 of:

http://www.astro-physics.com/tech_support/mounts/keypad_v417.pdf

For other polar alignment methods, see page 19 of:

http://www.astro-physics.com/tech_support/mounts/keypad_v412.pdf

Peter


---In ap-gto@..., <thefamily90@...> wrote :
OK, so I don't know what the heck I am doing.
Hopefully one of you can help me.
 
I have my AP 1200 mount set up as best I can. Cannot see the N star from where the scope is located. When on or near the Meridian Saturn is drifting South.
While imaging I am working the button on the hand controller like a computer game. :^)
 
Any help would be greatly appreciated!
 
best,
 
Jim Phillips



Hytham A
 

I have never used Pempro because of its reliance on Maxim, but the QDA + further refinement with a standard drift alignment procedure and then synced to the RAPAS has been brilliant. 1 minute alignments in the field and you're set.


On Tue, Jun 16, 2015 at 12:19 PM, Steven Gallion stevegallion@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

PEMPro is the way to go! --- Steve Gallion



On Tuesday, June 16, 2015 10:44 AM, "Robert Chozick rchozick@... [ap-gto]" <ap-gto@...> wrote:


 
I also cannot see Polaris from my backyard mount. I try to be a minimalist whenever possible. I like the old-fashioned drift alignment method.  All you need is an eyepiece with crosshairs. It is best to use a Barlow to increase the magnification.  I use a digital angle measurement device to approximate the latitude  and then do the drift alignment. There are many references on the Internet to how to do this. The guidelines for how to move the mount are at the site below:


On Jun 16, 2015, at 10:25 AM, Ross Salinger rgsalinger@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:

 
Your mount comes with PEMPRO and PEMPRO has a Polar Alignment wizard that seems to work fine for many people including me. The methods in the manual will work but if I were you I would acquire some software that can build a pointing model which can tell you how far off you are after a pointing run by analyzing the size and nature of the errors. Both maxpoint and tpoint (in the sky x) are really good at this. The poor man’s method is to use Alignmaster  which is about $20 but people sometimes have trouble with it because it requires that you have a relatively unobstructed horizon at your disposal. You do need a camera and a computer for all of these so, I’d follow Peter’s advice if you’re a visual observer. I’d also have a RAPAS for times when you might use the mount where you can see Polaris.
 
Rgrds-Ross
 
From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...]
Sent: Tuesday, June 16, 2015 8:15 AM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: [ap-gto] Re: Drift method question
 
 
Operating manuals for A-P mounts describe different methods for polar alignment. Did you read the manuals?

My preferred method is Quick Star Drift Alignment using finderscope. See page 6 of:

http://www.astro-physics.com/tech_support/mounts/keypad_v417.pdf

For other polar alignment methods, see page 19 of:

http://www.astro-physics.com/tech_support/mounts/keypad_v412.pdf

Peter


---In ap-gto@..., <thefamily90@...> wrote :
OK, so I don't know what the heck I am doing.
Hopefully one of you can help me.
 
I have my AP 1200 mount set up as best I can. Cannot see the N star from where the scope is located. When on or near the Meridian Saturn is drifting South.
While imaging I am working the button on the hand controller like a computer game. :^)
 
Any help would be greatly appreciated!
 
best,
 
Jim Phillips




Steven
 

PEMPro will work with Meade DSI & Envisage software. --- Steve



On Tuesday, June 16, 2015 11:54 AM, "Hytham A hytham.a@... [ap-gto]" wrote:


 
I have never used Pempro because of its reliance on Maxim, but the QDA + further refinement with a standard drift alignment procedure and then synced to the RAPAS has been brilliant. 1 minute alignments in the field and you're set.


On Tue, Jun 16, 2015 at 12:19 PM, Steven Gallion stevegallion@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 
PEMPro is the way to go! --- Steve Gallion



On Tuesday, June 16, 2015 10:44 AM, "Robert Chozick rchozick@... [ap-gto]" <ap-gto@...> wrote:


 
I also cannot see Polaris from my backyard mount. I try to be a minimalist whenever possible. I like the old-fashioned drift alignment method.  All you need is an eyepiece with crosshairs. It is best to use a Barlow to increase the magnification.  I use a digital angle measurement device to approximate the latitude  and then do the drift alignment. There are many references on the Internet to how to do this. The guidelines for how to move the mount are at the site below:


On Jun 16, 2015, at 10:25 AM, Ross Salinger rgsalinger@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:

 
Your mount comes with PEMPRO and PEMPRO has a Polar Alignment wizard that seems to work fine for many people including me. The methods in the manual will work but if I were you I would acquire some software that can build a pointing model which can tell you how far off you are after a pointing run by analyzing the size and nature of the errors. Both maxpoint and tpoint (in the sky x) are really good at this. The poor man’s method is to use Alignmaster  which is about $20 but people sometimes have trouble with it because it requires that you have a relatively unobstructed horizon at your disposal. You do need a camera and a computer for all of these so, I’d follow Peter’s advice if you’re a visual observer. I’d also have a RAPAS for times when you might use the mount where you can see Polaris.
 
Rgrds-Ross
 
From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...]
Sent: Tuesday, June 16, 2015 8:15 AM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: [ap-gto] Re: Drift method question
 
 
Operating manuals for A-P mounts describe different methods for polar alignment. Did you read the manuals?

My preferred method is Quick Star Drift Alignment using finderscope. See page 6 of:

http://www.astro-physics.com/tech_support/mounts/keypad_v417.pdf

For other polar alignment methods, see page 19 of:

http://www.astro-physics.com/tech_support/mounts/keypad_v412.pdf

Peter


---In ap-gto@..., <thefamily90@...> wrote :
OK, so I don't know what the heck I am doing.
Hopefully one of you can help me.
 
I have my AP 1200 mount set up as best I can. Cannot see the N star from where the scope is located. When on or near the Meridian Saturn is drifting South.
While imaging I am working the button on the hand controller like a computer game. :^)
 
Any help would be greatly appreciated!
 
best,
 
Jim Phillips






jimhp29401us
 

You guys are great but let me just say this. The mount is aligned fine except that Saturn, while imaging with a camera  under extremely high magnification (the entire FOV is about 2X the width of Saturn) is drifting South. All I was asking was if it is drifting South do I not need to move the polar axis in azimuth to the west?


topboxman
 

DId you set the mount's tracking to "Solar"?

Planets are probably not the best objects for polar alignment.

Last Friday night I imaged Saturn at 4000mm focal length. I was using Region of Interest (ROI) of 512x512 out of 1280x960 maximum resolution. I would say it took about 20 minutes for Saturn to drift from one corner diagonally to opposite corner of 512x512 FOV. I kind of expected it. My setup is always portable and I do not expect 100% perfect polar alignment.

I was taking video of 6 minutes each and about every 12 minutes, I bump the mount to move Saturn back to the appropriate position to continue to take 6 minutes video.

Maybe try on a star nearest to Saturn and see if it drifts the same way. Don't forget to set the tracking to Sidereal rate.

My mount is A-P1100GTO.

Peter



---In ap-gto@..., <thefamily90@...> wrote :

You guys are great but let me just say this. The mount is aligned fine except that Saturn, while imaging with a camera  under extremely high magnification (the entire FOV is about 2X the width of Saturn) is drifting South. All I was asking was if it is drifting South do I not need to move the polar axis in azimuth to the west?


Roland Christen
 

Depends on the part of the sky Saturn is in.
 
Rolando
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: thefamily90@... [ap-gto]
To: ap-gto
Sent: Tue, Jun 16, 2015 2:43 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: Drift method question



You guys are great but let me just say this. The mount is aligned fine except that Saturn, while imaging with a camera  under extremely high magnification (the entire FOV is about 2X the width of Saturn) is drifting South. All I was asking was if it is drifting South do I not need to move the polar axis in azimuth to the west?


jimhp29401us
 

It is only worth imaging Saturn when it is on or near the meridian, so due South would be my answer. Saturn is due South, the rate is on sidereal and using the largest FOV Lucam Recorder offers and Saturn drifts directly South. I am constantly hitting the N button on my keypad (AP 1200) at .5X and Only the N button. 

If anyone knows what I need to do to the mount (which direction I need to move it in azimuth, and only that) given that Saturn is on the Meridian and is drifting due South please let me know. I have uploaded a copy of the image of Saturn I was able to get last night on the other AP user group so I know I can image with the mount as it is. I just want to slow the drifting down if possible.

best,

Jim


Roland Christen
 

Well, turn the knobs in one direction and if it drifts faster then turn them the other way. Keep count of how many rotations you have turned. You will probably need to do several full rotations before you see much change.
 
Since Saturn drifts south, then sidereal has no impact. If the driving rate is wrong in RA, the drift would not be south.
 
Roland
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: thefamily90@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...>
To: ap-gto
Sent: Tue, Jun 16, 2015 8:20 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: Drift method question



It is only worth imaging Saturn when it is on or near the meridian, so due South would be my answer. Saturn is due South, the rate is on sidereal and using the largest FOV Lucam Recorder offers and Saturn drifts directly South. I am constantly hitting the N button on my keypad (AP 1200) at .5X and Only the N button. 

If anyone knows what I need to do to the mount (which direction I need to move it in azimuth, and only that) given that  Saturn is on the Meridian and is drifting due South please let me know. I have uploaded a copy of the image of Saturn I was able to get last night on the other AP user group so I know I can image with the mount as it is. I just want to slow the drifting down if possible.

best,

Jim



Steven
 

What happens when the rate is on Solar? --- Steve



On Tuesday, June 16, 2015 7:20 PM, "thefamily90@... [ap-gto]" wrote:


 
It is only worth imaging Saturn when it is on or near the meridian, so due South would be my answer. Saturn is due South, the rate is on sidereal and using the largest FOV Lucam Recorder offers and Saturn drifts directly South. I am constantly hitting the N button on my keypad (AP 1200) at .5X and Only the N button. 

If anyone knows what I need to do to the mount (which direction I need to move it in azimuth, and only that) given that Saturn is on the Meridian and is drifting due South please let me know. I have uploaded a copy of the image of Saturn I was able to get last night on the other AP user group so I know I can image with the mount as it is. I just want to slow the drifting down if possible.

best,

Jim



jimhp29401us
 

I agree Roland. I cannot be terribly far off and trial and error seems the best way to move forward.
Many thanks everyone!

Jim