caps for the serial ports?, and a vote for wireless LAN.


Rick Thurmond
 

My 1200's serial port connectors have gotten a little rusty. Does anyone know where one can get those plastic caps to cover them with? I've not used them up until now, my friend has a program we plan to use to track satellites and the ISS, and we're going to try it out. And here I am with embarrassing rusty serial ports on an otherwise beautiful mount!

I'd vote for 802.11 wireless LAN to replace the serial ports. Then I wouldn't have to take my computer outside.

Generally, though, I'm happy to get away from the computer for a change, and just use the fine hand controller. In addition to the great mechanicals of the mount, the fact that I can run it without being disturbed by a computer is its greatest feature.

Rick


Joe Zeglinski
 

Hi Rick,

Those anti static pink DB9 serial port plastic caps that come with the
GTOCP3 are nice, but they are easily lost. All you need to do is brush against
them a bit, and they are gone. Thy are really meant only for shipping the
mount to you, and not as weather protection. However, there is something much
better - read on.

When I worked on design rugged flight computers, and for installation on
bulldozers (talk about vibration and dust water, and mud), we plugged the
unused DB sockets and plugs on the connector back panel with aluminum cover
caps held down with DB cable connector mounting screws. These are fine if you
want a fairly permanent cover. Otherwise, some of the CONEC's DB caps have
EMI gripping ridges, so they grip the panel connector quite well, even without
the two DB type side screws.

Visit www.CONEC.com and click on tab:
Catalog->D-SUB Connectors->
Scroll way down the page to "Accessories/Mounting hardware for D-Sub
Connectors.

Product items #97 to # 103 on that page, give you a range of caps from
plastic, to aluminum, and even rubberized water tight. Click on the numbered
line item to get the large picture, part numbers, and engineering drawing
info.
They are variously called: "Dust caps, Screen caps, or Shield caps" -
depending on how rugged their connector environment.
(e.g. 99. Covered screen cap for EMI/RFI)


I would choose the EMI/RFI types - they have a tighter ribbed ridge, so
they won't come off as easily, if you don't want to screw the caps down
permanently.

CONEC is quite unique - nobody else makes aluminum EMI/RFI shielding DB
connector caps (as well as the flimsy plastic ones). Worth buying several, in
case you somehow manage to lose one.

When you order, you also have to select either a male of female connector
cap, as well as the number of pin positions (width) of the DB panel connector
you need to cover. I haven't seen these from any distributor like Jameco or
Digi-Key, in the past, so you may have to deal with CONEC directly.

These are really great aluminum DB caps.
Hope this helps,
Joe

----- Original Message -----
From: "Rick Thurmond" <yahoogroups@rickthurmond.com>
To: <ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, June 19, 2007 10:04 PM
Subject: [ap-gto] caps for the serial ports?, and a vote for wireless LAN.


My 1200's serial port connectors have gotten a little rusty. Does
anyone know where one can get those plastic caps to cover them with?
I've not used them up until now, my friend has a program we plan to
use to track satellites and the ISS, and we're going to try it out.
And here I am with embarrassing rusty serial ports on an otherwise
beautiful mount!


Rick Thurmond
 

Joe,
Wow, that's exactly the answer I was looking for. Where else can one
get such good advice? I'll get some of those covers.

Thanks,
Rick

On Jun 19, 2007, at 8:02 PM, Joseph Zeglinski wrote:

Hi Rick,

Those anti static pink DB9 serial port plastic caps that come with the
GTOCP3 are nice, but they are easily lost. All you need to do is
brush against
them a bit, and they are gone. Thy are really meant only for
shipping the
mount to you, and not as weather protection. However, there is
something much
better - read on.

When I worked on design rugged flight computers, and for
installation on
bulldozers (talk about vibration and dust water, and mud), we
plugged the
unused DB sockets and plugs on the connector back panel with
aluminum cover
caps held down with DB cable connector mounting screws. These are
fine if you
want a fairly permanent cover. Otherwise, some of the CONEC's DB
caps have
EMI gripping ridges, so they grip the panel connector quite well,
even without
the two DB type side screws.

Visit www.CONEC.com and click on tab:
Catalog->D-SUB Connectors->
Scroll way down the page to "Accessories/Mounting hardware for D-Sub
Connectors.

Product items #97 to # 103 on that page, give you a range of caps from
plastic, to aluminum, and even rubberized water tight. Click on the
numbered
line item to get the large picture, part numbers, and engineering
drawing
info.
They are variously called: "Dust caps, Screen caps, or Shield caps" -
depending on how rugged their connector environment.
(e.g. 99. Covered screen cap for EMI/RFI)

I would choose the EMI/RFI types - they have a tighter ribbed
ridge, so
they won't come off as easily, if you don't want to screw the caps
down
permanently.

CONEC is quite unique - nobody else makes aluminum EMI/RFI
shielding DB
connector caps (as well as the flimsy plastic ones). Worth buying
several, in
case you somehow manage to lose one.

When you order, you also have to select either a male of female
connector
cap, as well as the number of pin positions (width) of the DB panel
connector
you need to cover. I haven't seen these from any distributor like
Jameco or
Digi-Key, in the past, so you may have to deal with CONEC directly.

These are really great aluminum DB caps.
Hope this helps,
Joe

----- Original Message -----
From: "Rick Thurmond" <yahoogroups@rickthurmond.com>
To: <ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, June 19, 2007 10:04 PM
Subject: [ap-gto] caps for the serial ports?, and a vote for
wireless LAN.

My 1200's serial port connectors have gotten a little rusty. Does
anyone know where one can get those plastic caps to cover them with?
I've not used them up until now, my friend has a program we plan to
use to track satellites and the ISS, and we're going to try it out.
And here I am with embarrassing rusty serial ports on an otherwise
beautiful mount!


masterson_harold <hfm5022@...>
 

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, Rick Thurmond <yahoogroups@...> wrote:

My 1200's serial port connectors have gotten a little rusty. Does
anyone know where one can get those plastic caps to cover them
with?
I've not used them up until now, my friend has a program we plan
to
use to track satellites and the ISS, and we're going to try it
out.
And here I am with embarrassing rusty serial ports on an otherwise
beautiful mount!

I'd vote for 802.11 wireless LAN to replace the serial ports.
Then
I wouldn't have to take my computer outside.

Generally, though, I'm happy to get away from the computer for a
change, and just use the fine hand controller. In addition to the
great mechanicals of the mount, the fact that I can run it without
being disturbed by a computer is its greatest feature.

Rick
Rick are you planning to use Satellite Tracker or some other program
and please post the results when you try it out.


drgert1
 

Hi,

I vote against WLAN in the mount. Users who want it can get 3rd party
serial bluetooth adapter. Let's not waste Roland's time and effort on
something that user can do themselves vs the stuff that only he on
this planet can do.

Clear Skeis,

Gert

I'd vote for 802.11 wireless LAN to replace the serial ports. Then
I wouldn't have to take my computer outside.


Rick Thurmond
 

Bluetooth sounds good, too. What is the range for bluetooth? Will
it go thirty feet and through a window? Then I can keep the
computer inside.

Rick

On Jun 20, 2007, at 11:06 AM, drgert1 wrote:

Hi,

I vote against WLAN in the mount. Users who want it can get 3rd party
serial bluetooth adapter. Let's not waste Roland's time and effort on
something that user can do themselves vs the stuff that only he on
this planet can do.

Clear Skeis,

Gert

I'd vote for 802.11 wireless LAN to replace the serial ports. Then
I wouldn't have to take my computer outside.