Date   

Re: End of an era?

Michael Hambrick <mike.hambrick@...>
 

Hi Jim

Is your scope case one of the Astro-Physics wood cases ? I had the same experience with my 180 EDT case. As I am getting older the force of gravity is getting stronger.

Astro-Physics sold me a set of removable wheels that I installed on my 180 EDT case, but you can also get them directly from a company called Crest Lock. Some people may remember that Hartmann and Boyt suitcases use these wheels before the in-line roller wheels became so popular. Be sure to get the ones with ball bearings. You will need to move the foam on the bottom of your case out of the way to install the receivers, and you should install the wheels at both ends of the case.



Best Regards

Michael Hambrick
ARLANXEO
TSR Global Manufacturing Support
PO Box 2000
Orange, TX 77631-2000
Phone: +1 (409) 882-2799
email: mike.hambrick@...


Re: IP address of an AP1600 ?

christian viladrich
 

Hi Brian,

Thanks for this. I'll test this ASAP.

Christian

Le 02/08/2020 à 16:16, Brian Valente a écrit :

Hi Christian

have you tried using the search tool in APCC?

little magnifying glass next to the connection type

image.png

On Sun, Aug 2, 2020 at 9:10 AM christian viladrich <christian.viladrich@...> wrote:
Hi,

I am currently on a mission at Astroqueyras observatory (France). We
have two AP1600 mounts up there.

We are having a little bit of a problem to find the IP address of one of
the mounts (it is OK for the second one).

We have the serial number of the mount. But when we apply the procedure,
there is no way to connect to this IP address.

Any idea of what can be going wrong ? Is there any way the scan the IP
address to find the address of the mount ?

Thanks for your help.

Christian Viladrich

Technical Support Group / Astroqueyras







--
Brian 



Brian Valente


Re: IP address of an AP1600 ?

christian viladrich
 

Thanks a lot Chris for your quick answer.

For some reasons, procedure #2 does not work.

I am checking whether I can find the userid/ password delivered with the AP1600 to log to the other two applications.

Best regards

Christian

Le 02/08/2020 à 16:19, uncarollo2 <chris1011@...> via groups.io a écrit :

We are having a little bit of a problem to find the IP address of one of
the mounts (it is OK for the second one).
Hello Christian,

We have several ways to find the mount on our web page. I have posted them below. Try one of the "Find Mount" utilities and see if they work:


 
  • WiFi Poll for GTOCP4 and GTOCP5 Ethernet Application to find current IP addresses and other network information. It also can open the GTOCP4 or GTOCP5 webpage in IE. Requires AP V2 ASCOM Driver and a serial or USB connection to the control box. NOTE: We had removed the link to this .exe file earlier since it had caused a problem with firewalls and anti-virus programs. It is now back on the website as an encrypted ZIP file, and is in a restricted area of the website. Both the download and the zip-extraction will require the same password that you use for downloading Keypad firmware. Normal Windows extraction is fine. A purchased copy of WinZip is NOT required.
  • Default IP Address Calculator and Latitude/Longitude Coordinate Converter This link has two handy tools:
    ** IP Address Calculator - will take the CPx serial number and return the default IP address for the device. While the Wi-Fi poll and FindMounts look at your actual system and find devices, this only does a basic calculation without looking into your computer.
    ** Latitude/Longitude Coordinate Converter - Enter local coordinates in decimal degrees, and press Calculate Coordinates to get the Degree:Minute:Second format.
  • Find Mounts Java Applet to find current GTOCP4 IP addresses and other network information. Works for any computer - Windows, Mac or Linux running Java. Requires the Java Runtime Environment from Oracle (already found on many computers) This also was placed on the website as an encrypted ZIP file, and is in a restricted area of the website. Both the download and the zip-extraction will require the same password that you use for downloading Keypad firmware. Normal extraction is fine. A purchased copy of WinZip should NOT be required.
 


-----Original Message-----
From: christian viladrich <christian.viladrich@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Aug 2, 2020 11:10 am
Subject: [ap-gto] IP address of an AP1600 ?

Hi,

I am currently on a mission at Astroqueyras observatory (France). We
have two AP1600 mounts up there.

We are having a little bit of a problem to find the IP address of one of
the mounts (it is OK for the second one).

We have the serial number of the mount. But when we apply the procedure,
there is no way to connect to this IP address.

Any idea of what can be going wrong ? Is there any way the scan the IP
address to find the address of the mount ?

Thanks for your help.

Christian Viladrich

Technical Support Group / Astroqueyras






Re: IP address of an AP1600 ?

Roland Christen
 


We are having a little bit of a problem to find the IP address of one of
the mounts (it is OK for the second one).
Hello Christian,

We have several ways to find the mount on our web page. I have posted them below. Try one of the "Find Mount" utilities and see if they work:


 
  • WiFi Poll for GTOCP4 and GTOCP5 Ethernet Application to find current IP addresses and other network information. It also can open the GTOCP4 or GTOCP5 webpage in IE. Requires AP V2 ASCOM Driver and a serial or USB connection to the control box. NOTE: We had removed the link to this .exe file earlier since it had caused a problem with firewalls and anti-virus programs. It is now back on the website as an encrypted ZIP file, and is in a restricted area of the website. Both the download and the zip-extraction will require the same password that you use for downloading Keypad firmware. Normal Windows extraction is fine. A purchased copy of WinZip is NOT required.
  • Default IP Address Calculator and Latitude/Longitude Coordinate Converter This link has two handy tools:
    ** IP Address Calculator - will take the CPx serial number and return the default IP address for the device. While the Wi-Fi poll and FindMounts look at your actual system and find devices, this only does a basic calculation without looking into your computer.
    ** Latitude/Longitude Coordinate Converter - Enter local coordinates in decimal degrees, and press Calculate Coordinates to get the Degree:Minute:Second format.
  • Find Mounts Java Applet to find current GTOCP4 IP addresses and other network information. Works for any computer - Windows, Mac or Linux running Java. Requires the Java Runtime Environment from Oracle (already found on many computers) This also was placed on the website as an encrypted ZIP file, and is in a restricted area of the website. Both the download and the zip-extraction will require the same password that you use for downloading Keypad firmware. Normal extraction is fine. A purchased copy of WinZip should NOT be required.
 


-----Original Message-----
From: christian viladrich <christian.viladrich@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Aug 2, 2020 11:10 am
Subject: [ap-gto] IP address of an AP1600 ?

Hi,

I am currently on a mission at Astroqueyras observatory (France). We
have two AP1600 mounts up there.

We are having a little bit of a problem to find the IP address of one of
the mounts (it is OK for the second one).

We have the serial number of the mount. But when we apply the procedure,
there is no way to connect to this IP address.

Any idea of what can be going wrong ? Is there any way the scan the IP
address to find the address of the mount ?

Thanks for your help.

Christian Viladrich

Technical Support Group / Astroqueyras






Re: IP address of an AP1600 ?

 

Hi Christian

have you tried using the search tool in APCC?

little magnifying glass next to the connection type

image.png

On Sun, Aug 2, 2020 at 9:10 AM christian viladrich <christian.viladrich@...> wrote:
Hi,

I am currently on a mission at Astroqueyras observatory (France). We
have two AP1600 mounts up there.

We are having a little bit of a problem to find the IP address of one of
the mounts (it is OK for the second one).

We have the serial number of the mount. But when we apply the procedure,
there is no way to connect to this IP address.

Any idea of what can be going wrong ? Is there any way the scan the IP
address to find the address of the mount ?

Thanks for your help.

Christian Viladrich

Technical Support Group / Astroqueyras







--
Brian 



Brian Valente


IP address of an AP1600 ?

christian viladrich
 

Hi,

I am currently on a mission at Astroqueyras observatory (France). We have two AP1600 mounts up there.

We are having a little bit of a problem to find the IP address of one of the mounts (it is OK for the second one).

We have the serial number of the mount. But when we apply the procedure, there is no way to connect to this IP address.

Any idea of what can be going wrong ? Is there any way the scan the IP address to find the address of the mount ?

Thanks for your help.

Christian Viladrich

Technical Support Group / Astroqueyras


Re: large alignment error with polemaster & mach2

Suresh Mohan
 

I’ve used both ( borrowed pole master ) and Rapas ( kindly note I live at 13 degree latitude )I found Rapas better because with pole master the star would dance around for the final adjustment 
Suresh


On 01-Aug-2020, at 8:59 PM, Cheng-Yang Tan via groups.io <cytan299@...> wrote:


Hi Rolando,
   I think my "Unfortunately, SC polar alignment costs $", is more of a lament that the software that comes with PM does not seem to be as accurate and the op has to spend money to get it to work better.

  To be clear, I don't begrudge people making money from doing software work.

cytan

On Saturday, August 1, 2020, 10:02:50 AM CDT, uncarollo2 <chris1011@...> wrote:



Unfortunately, SC polar alignment costs $
Everything should not be zero cost. Writing software takes time and expertise and should be rewarded. If everything is zero cost we will all be forced to become subsistence farmers scraping a living from the soil.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: Cheng-Yang Tan via groups.io <cytan299@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Aug 1, 2020 8:18 am
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] large alignment error with polemaster & mach2

I’d suggest trying Sharpcap with the Polemaster camera. I’ve always found Sharpcap gives a better PA than the Polemaster software. An advantage of SC is that it gives an alignment error when you are adjusting alt and az which is absent in PM software.

Unfortunately, SC polar alignment costs $ and is an annual subscription, but it’s cheap.

As usual YMMV

cytan


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Saturday, August 1, 2020, 7:51 AM, Andrea Lucchetti <andlucchett@...> wrote:
Hello,
I need to polar align my Mach 2 very quickly to save time on field.
I thought Polemaster would have been a good choice but I cant get a good alignment with it (I am ways off)
The procedure goes very well, till the end, including the precise alignment step, but I have drift in my images.
running the Polemaster twice results in a small change.


I am not using the refraction calculation , as I leave at 42 deg latitude: can this be one of the reason?

my aim is to shoot 10 min subs unguided (@790mm focal and 1,6 arcsec/pixel resolution).

I still don't have my OTA ready so it is difficult for me to check with the drift method for the time being ( I can borrow a dslr and C8)

Would the RAPAS be a better solution for my needs? 
I understand it can be mounted on the MACH2 using a dovetail, with repeatable accuracy.
Is the accuracy enough for imaging and how it compares to Polemaster?

Thank you,
Andrea


Re: End of an era?

thefamily90 Phillips
 

Does anyone know an easy way to either attach wheels or a dolly that will work to move the older and heavier AP 10 inch in its case around? I think I used to be able to pick the case up with the telescope inside but recently have resorted to pushing and pulling it across the floor. Thanks for any help.

Best,

Jim


From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> on behalf of uncarollo2 <chris1011@...> via groups.io <chris1011@...>
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 10:35:11 AM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] End of an era?
 

Do you autograph all of the Stowaways ?
No, I did this one on my first prototype at NEAF a couple of years ago for a laugh.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: Michael Hambrick via groups.io <mike.hambrick@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Jul 31, 2020 10:35 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] End of an era?

Nice work Roland

Do you autograph all of the Stowaways ?


Best Regards

Michael Hambrick
ARLANXEO
TSR Global Manufacturing Support
PO Box 2000
Orange, TX 77631-2000
Phone: +1 (409) 882-2799
email: mike.hambrick@...


Re: large alignment error with polemaster & mach2

Andrea Lucchetti
 

Hi Terri,
Thank you.
I havealso  tried What you suggest, larger gain , and can see several stars. No luck.
I also have the AP 900 adapter, the polemaster is firmly attached.
The last thing I will check is the location.
Honestly I don’t remember the setting: when I received the camera I have tried at home and I could have filled in An approximate latitude.
I am having a one week break, but when back that will be the first check.
I do hope is simple like that ( I will feel a little silly but happy :-)
Andrea

Il giorno dom 2 ago 2020 alle 17:10 Terri Zittritsch <theresamarie11@...> ha scritto:

Hi Andrea, 
I could see large alignment errors with pole master if I didn’t have the gain / exposure adjusted to see the required dim stars in the monitor step.  I use the second step for both Gain and exposure.  So even though you can easily see Polaris with the lowest Exposure/gain, you should turn it up to see some of the dimmer stars around Polaris.   One way to see if gain is too low is to look at how stable the image is in the monitor step.  The two white boxes On the big screen should be stable and tracking 2 stars.    This should allow you a good polar align with the red/green pole boxes in the small monitor screen.   My guess is you’re only getting a good initial align to 5 arc minutes which is what I was getting until figuring out the monitor step wasn’t stable.


this was my problem, and once fixed my alignment results in little dec guiding input with the Mach 2.   


other than this, make sure the camera is mounted solidly and not able to move, and if you do remove it or adjust it at all, you need to recalibrate it’s centering in the app.     


terri


Re: large alignment error with polemaster & mach2

Terri Zittritsch
 

Hi Andrea, 
I could see large alignment errors with pole master if I didn’t have the gain / exposure adjusted to see the required dim stars in the monitor step.  I use the second step for both Gain and exposure.  So even though you can easily see Polaris with the lowest Exposure/gain, you should turn it up to see some of the dimmer stars around Polaris.   One way to see if gain is too low is to look at how stable the image is in the monitor step.  The two white boxes On the big screen should be stable and tracking 2 stars.    This should allow you a good polar align with the red/green pole boxes in the small monitor screen.   My guess is you’re only getting a good initial align to 5 arc minutes which is what I was getting until figuring out the monitor step wasn’t stable.


this was my problem, and once fixed my alignment results in little dec guiding input with the Mach 2.   


other than this, make sure the camera is mounted solidly and not able to move, and if you do remove it or adjust it at all, you need to recalibrate it’s centering in the app.     


terri


Re: large alignment error with polemaster & mach2

Jim Hawn
 

Hi Robert,

I think that is right.  As a rule of thumb, I too find that one arc minute or less is adequate for producing decent subs using PHD2 all other things equal.


locked Re: [ap-ug] To mask or not to mask, that is the question

Richard Crisp
 

If I go in public I wear mask and gloves

“Corrected” by my iPhone

On Aug 1, 2020, at 5:01 PM, chris1011@aol.com wrote:


Re: Moving to a new imaging laptop #APCC

Dean Jacobsen
 

Yes, we will see how well it works.  ;-)  I want to carry over as many of the settings from the old machine to the new machine as possible.  Then I can go in and reconfigure machine specific settings - like the COM port setting - manually on the new machine.  Now I just need the new machine.
--
Dean Jacobsen
http://astrophoto.net/wp/
Image Gallery - http://astrophoto.net/wp/image-gallery/
Astrobin - https://www.astrobin.com/users/deanjacobsen/ 


Re: To mask or not to mask, that is the question

DFisch
 

And here I thought Rowland was going to talk about putting a mask on his 10 inch Mak to make it a 4 “ in order to be fair to all the other telescope makers

On Sat, Aug 1, 2020 at 21:57 Robert Sinitiere <bobstar9@...> wrote:
Funny but good video.....So, wear your Masks, for astronauts and non astronuts!
Be Safe everyone at Astro-Physics, and everyone else out there.  I was a unit based pharmacist and infusion pharmacist for 43 years.  I’m 70 now, and I’m sure masks played some part in my survival, for N95 PPE’s on the units, and self preservation PPE’s
compounding some fairly toxic chemotherapy agents.  Let’s all survive to see 2021!!
CLEAR SKIES!!



On Aug 1, 2020, at 4:38 PM, uncarollo2 <chris1011@...> via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:


Hi Astronuts,

This is completely off-topic. My daughter sent me this funny video which attempts to answer today's most pressing question. What are masks for and do they really work? The video is funny and completely non-political. It's in the style of the old Myth Buster's TV programs where they were always blowing things up or burning them down. So, if you have a few minutes to spare, sit down and watch this:

Love ya all and stay healthy,
Rolando Kissing heart

--
TJF MOBILE


locked Re: [ap-ug] To mask or not to mask, that is the question

thefamily90 Phillips
 

As a physician, I have not missed a day at work since this virus stuff began. I have been there with almost nothing to do for days on end but I still have gone in. Things are getting back to normal in terms of patient volume and biopsies, etc. I just hope we move forward and not backward.


From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> on behalf of thefamily90 Phillips <thefamily90@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2020 9:08:43 AM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>; rdcrisp@... <rdcrisp@...>; main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io>; robert-wynne@... <robert-wynne@...>
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] To mask or not to mask, that is the question
 
I wear a mask when out in public or when dealing with patients in the Dermatopathology office down the hall. As a dermatopathologist I read skin margins for excision of cancers while the patient is in the office. I have to have contact with the physician and often go into the dermatology office during the procedure. I wear a mask then. I don’t really know whether it is doing anyone any good or not, but I know if I don’t wear one I will make others nervous and there is no need to do that.


From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> on behalf of uncarollo2 <chris1011@...> via groups.io <chris1011@...>
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 8:01:27 PM
To: rdcrisp@... <rdcrisp@...>; main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io>; robert-wynne@... <robert-wynne@...>; main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] To mask or not to mask, that is the question
 
It takes a while to get used to it. Just like it took a year to begin wearing seatbelts back in 1960. But now it's automatic. I don't even think about seatbelts, they just seem to attach themselves.

Rolando Blush


-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Crisp <rdcrisp@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io; robert-wynne@...; main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Aug 1, 2020 6:11 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] To mask or not to mask, that is the question

I figure there are three scenarios of interest re: masks
 
  1. Preventing you from inhaling viruses
  2. Limiting the range of your phlegm
  3. Keeping you from touching your nose and mouth etc
 
I figure 1 is about like expecting chicken wire to keep mosquitoes out
#2 is reasonable and a kind thing to do for your fellow man (this is S.O.P. in Japan for decades btw) and #3 is a dead on BULLSEYE for me
 
It’s a constant battle for me to try to remember to keep my hands away from my face/eyes.
 
Not sure about you, but it’s hard for me to break habits that are going on their 7th decade!
 
 
 
From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roland Christen via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 3:31 PM
To: robert-wynne@...; main@ap-ug.groups.io; chris1011@...; main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] To mask or not to mask, that is the question
 
Yes, maybe a fine point.
I wear one not for my own protection because breathing in doesn't prevent my getting a lung full of critters. My mask is for the protection of other people so that my phlegm and snot doesn't spray into the air when i sneeze or cough.
 
Our company was shot down for 2 months because of governor's orders, but now we are all working again. None of our crew has caught the virus, all of us wear our masks here at work when we have to interact or are within 10 ft of each other. Our small operation cannot survive if we get sick, so the mask is a small inconvenience.
 
Just heard the governor may shut our state down again because of a surge of rising cases. Hope not because right now we are going gang busters and want to produce and ship product. Our competitors overseas have no restrictions now and are eager to put US companies out of business. Is that enough reason to don a mask in public? I hope so.
 
Rolando
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: ROBERT WYNNE <robert-wynne@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io; Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...>; main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>
Sent: Sat, Aug 1, 2020 5:15 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] To mask or not to mask, that is the question
Maybe this is putting too fine a point on topic without any humor; but from
N95 masks are designed to remove more than 95% of all particles that are at least 0.3 microns (µm) in diameter. In fact, measurements of the particle filtration efficiency of N95 masks show that they are capable of filtering ≈99.8% of particles with a diameter of ≈0.1 μm (Rengasamy et al., 2017). SARS-CoV-2 is an enveloped virus ≈0.1 μm in diameter, so N95 masks are capable of filtering most free virions, but they do more than that. How so? Viruses are often transmitted through respiratory droplets produced by coughing and sneezing. Respiratory droplets are usually divided into two size bins, large droplets (>5 μm in diameter) that fall rapidly to the ground and are thus transmitted only over short distances, and small droplets (≤5 μm in diameter). Small droplets can evaporate into 'droplet nuclei', remain suspended in air for significant periods of time and could be inhaled. Some viruses, such as measles, can be transmitted by droplet nuclei (Tellier et al., 2019). Larger droplets are also known to transmit viruses, usually by settling onto surfaces that are touched and transported by hands onto mucosal membranes such as the eyes, nose and mouth (CDC, 2020). The characteristic diameter of large droplets produced by sneezing is ~100 μm (Han et al., 2013), while the diameter of droplet nuclei produced by coughing is on the order of ~1 μm (Yang et al., 2007). At present, it is unclear whether surfaces or air are the dominant mode of SARS-CoV-2 transmission, but N95 masks should provide some protection against both (Jefferson et al., 2009Leung et al., 2020).
On 08/01/2020 2:37 PM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:
 
 
Hi Astronuts,
 
This is completely off-topic. My daughter sent me this funny video which attempts to answer today's most pressing question. What are masks for and do they really work? The video is funny and completely non-political. It's in the style of the old Myth Buster's TV programs where they were always blowing things up or burning them down. So, if you have a few minutes to spare, sit down and watch this:
 
Love ya all and stay healthy,
Rolando Kissing heart


locked Re: [ap-ug] To mask or not to mask, that is the question

thefamily90 Phillips
 

I wear a mask when out in public or when dealing with patients in the Dermatopathology office down the hall. As a dermatopathologist I read skin margins for excision of cancers while the patient is in the office. I have to have contact with the physician and often go into the dermatology office during the procedure. I wear a mask then. I don’t really know whether it is doing anyone any good or not, but I know if I don’t wear one I will make others nervous and there is no need to do that.


From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> on behalf of uncarollo2 <chris1011@...> via groups.io <chris1011@...>
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 8:01:27 PM
To: rdcrisp@... <rdcrisp@...>; main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io>; robert-wynne@... <robert-wynne@...>; main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] To mask or not to mask, that is the question
 
It takes a while to get used to it. Just like it took a year to begin wearing seatbelts back in 1960. But now it's automatic. I don't even think about seatbelts, they just seem to attach themselves.

Rolando Blush


-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Crisp <rdcrisp@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io; robert-wynne@...; main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Aug 1, 2020 6:11 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] To mask or not to mask, that is the question

I figure there are three scenarios of interest re: masks
 
  1. Preventing you from inhaling viruses
  2. Limiting the range of your phlegm
  3. Keeping you from touching your nose and mouth etc
 
I figure 1 is about like expecting chicken wire to keep mosquitoes out
#2 is reasonable and a kind thing to do for your fellow man (this is S.O.P. in Japan for decades btw) and #3 is a dead on BULLSEYE for me
 
It’s a constant battle for me to try to remember to keep my hands away from my face/eyes.
 
Not sure about you, but it’s hard for me to break habits that are going on their 7th decade!
 
 
 
From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roland Christen via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 3:31 PM
To: robert-wynne@...; main@ap-ug.groups.io; chris1011@...; main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] To mask or not to mask, that is the question
 
Yes, maybe a fine point.
I wear one not for my own protection because breathing in doesn't prevent my getting a lung full of critters. My mask is for the protection of other people so that my phlegm and snot doesn't spray into the air when i sneeze or cough.
 
Our company was shot down for 2 months because of governor's orders, but now we are all working again. None of our crew has caught the virus, all of us wear our masks here at work when we have to interact or are within 10 ft of each other. Our small operation cannot survive if we get sick, so the mask is a small inconvenience.
 
Just heard the governor may shut our state down again because of a surge of rising cases. Hope not because right now we are going gang busters and want to produce and ship product. Our competitors overseas have no restrictions now and are eager to put US companies out of business. Is that enough reason to don a mask in public? I hope so.
 
Rolando
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: ROBERT WYNNE <robert-wynne@...>
To: main@ap-ug.groups.io; Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...>; main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>
Sent: Sat, Aug 1, 2020 5:15 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-ug] To mask or not to mask, that is the question
Maybe this is putting too fine a point on topic without any humor; but from
N95 masks are designed to remove more than 95% of all particles that are at least 0.3 microns (µm) in diameter. In fact, measurements of the particle filtration efficiency of N95 masks show that they are capable of filtering ≈99.8% of particles with a diameter of ≈0.1 μm (Rengasamy et al., 2017). SARS-CoV-2 is an enveloped virus ≈0.1 μm in diameter, so N95 masks are capable of filtering most free virions, but they do more than that. How so? Viruses are often transmitted through respiratory droplets produced by coughing and sneezing. Respiratory droplets are usually divided into two size bins, large droplets (>5 μm in diameter) that fall rapidly to the ground and are thus transmitted only over short distances, and small droplets (≤5 μm in diameter). Small droplets can evaporate into 'droplet nuclei', remain suspended in air for significant periods of time and could be inhaled. Some viruses, such as measles, can be transmitted by droplet nuclei (Tellier et al., 2019). Larger droplets are also known to transmit viruses, usually by settling onto surfaces that are touched and transported by hands onto mucosal membranes such as the eyes, nose and mouth (CDC, 2020). The characteristic diameter of large droplets produced by sneezing is ~100 μm (Han et al., 2013), while the diameter of droplet nuclei produced by coughing is on the order of ~1 μm (Yang et al., 2007). At present, it is unclear whether surfaces or air are the dominant mode of SARS-CoV-2 transmission, but N95 masks should provide some protection against both (Jefferson et al., 2009Leung et al., 2020).
On 08/01/2020 2:37 PM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:
 
 
Hi Astronuts,
 
This is completely off-topic. My daughter sent me this funny video which attempts to answer today's most pressing question. What are masks for and do they really work? The video is funny and completely non-political. It's in the style of the old Myth Buster's TV programs where they were always blowing things up or burning them down. So, if you have a few minutes to spare, sit down and watch this:
 
Love ya all and stay healthy,
Rolando Kissing heart


Re: Pelican Nebula and M33

Robert Chozick
 

I enjoyed the discussion.  I actually took the second version I did for this and combined it 25% with the first one and like it better.


I like the control and manipulation in Photoshop.  I just combined 2 versions in a few seconds.  I prefer painting to pixel math.

Robert

On Aug 1, 2020, at 10:11 PM, Stuart <stuart.j.heggie@...> wrote:

Robert, you are right, we did talk about this before - I forgot - apologies!

I appreciate the detailed description of your workflow. I tend to start in PI and move to PS only at the end. I've not had enough (any?) experience with Nebulosity to know what it does but I've heard lots of good things about it.

For sure this is art more than science. Especially when it comes to "pretty pictures". I was very curious if you found the OSC camera made it easier or harder to achieve a pleasing balance. Either way, the steps you describe give you the control you need to produce the image you're looking for. I think both were very pleasing. Just curious about the colour balance using a OSC. 


On Sat, 1 Aug 2020 at 23:00, Robert Chozick via groups.io <rchozick=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Thanks Stuart.  I think we have had this discussion before.  I do use Photometric Color Calibration in PI.  I pre process in Nebulosity (I am a Mac user) then I go to PI and use SCNR to remove green, Photometric Color Calibration and DBE.  Then I go back to Nebulosity to use its Digital Development for its final stretch to a 16 bit Tiff for Photoshop.  Then I finish the rest of the way in Photoshop.  I have attached what M33 looked like when it went to Photoshop:


I did a quick processing in Photoshop without the galaxy color change described below.  I just took a bit of green out.


When I do galaxies I use Curves in Photoshop to bring up the red in the core and blue in the arms.  These are slight adjustments at specific points with the opposite color being reduced where the other is increased.  I manually play to create which part of the galaxy becomes core and which part starts the arms.  I know this is not kosher to many but I am not trying for exact reproduction.  I think of it as art more than science.  In the end I am not trying to get the exact colors just what looks nice to me.  I do think I overdid it the effect on this one.

Again the version I posted tonight


I did M33 a while ago without doing the color correction.  This one was LRGB plus a good amount of Ha.


I intend to get a lot more subs of M33 and also adding Ha.  The one I posted tonight was really only meant to be a test of the new camera.

Robert

On Aug 1, 2020, at 8:09 PM, Stuart <stuart.j.heggie@...> wrote:

Robert, both of these shots are really nice! I have been going back and forth on them and wonder about the constraints that OSC cameras put on you for colour. How do you calibrate them for colour? I shoot monochrome with filters and use PixInsight's PhotometricColorCalibration tool which is simply amazing. 

I mention this because the M33 shot seems like it could stand a tweak on colour but not an arbitrary one to "make it look like everyone else's". You mention that you use PixInsight. Have you tried that calibration tool?


On Sat, 1 Aug 2020 at 16:48, Robert Chozick via groups.io <rchozick=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I got a few more images from my test trip for my new ASI2600 CMOS color camera. 

Pelican Nebula

The bright stars in the Pelican got blown out and really unfixable with the shorter exposure subs so I learned that 5 min at f5 is too much with this camera when bright stars are present.  There was also a reflection in the right upper corner that I think I can fix by bringing the UV-IR filter closer to the sensor.  On the FSQ the CA-35 camera adapter allows a 2 inch filter to be screwed in but it is 30-40mm away from the sensor.  I am getting a ZWO filter drawer to bring it closer.  Hopefully that will fix it. 


M33

I needed more data on M33 and some Ha but I was surprised at the quality of the data for only 2.5 hours.


I need to try to always get more data on images.  In the past I have wanted to get a lot of images on every trip since it is so rare I go but I am going to try to get at least 5-6 hours of data at f5 and 8-12 hours at f8 from now on.

Robert Chozick






-- 

Stuart
http://www.astrofoto.ca/stuartheggie/

Robert Chozick






-- 

Stuart
http://www.astrofoto.ca/stuartheggie/

Robert Chozick




Re: large alignment error with polemaster & mach2

Robert Chozick
 

What degree of polar alignment do most find workable?  I find that Polemaster gets me from 30 arc seconds to one arc minute polar alignment.  Shouldn’t 1 arc minute be sufficient for guiding in most cases?

Robert


On Aug 1, 2020, at 5:53 PM, uncarollo2 <chris1011@...> via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:

Here is some more information:

Note, this covers only the RA drift rate. Dec drift will also always be there no matter how you polar align.

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>
Sent: Sat, Aug 1, 2020 5:51 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] large alignment error with polemaster & mach2

The RA tracking rate can vary anywhere from 35 to 70 arc seconds per hour (0.6 to 1.5 arc sec per minute) between the zenith and +- 3 hours from the zenith. The rate of drift is not linear. Modeling creates a drift curve for each point in the sky over the modeled track. The link below can tell you the actual tracking rate for different points in the sky:


These are approximate and depend on perfect polar alignment and not scope flex. In reality the drift can be worse if everything is not perfect. The calculations cover only the atmospheric refraction at nominal temperature and pressure.

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: Andrea Lucchetti <andlucchett@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Aug 1, 2020 5:35 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] large alignment error with polemaster & mach2

Hi Roland,
I always thought the refraction effect depends on latitude, but can be taken into account using the refracted pole.
do you think the effect is so  big at my latitude?
I leave and image at 42 deg north.

Or do you mean refraction due to altitude over the horizon?

In both cases, I don't understand why I need a model, unless you mean a model with different atmospheric parameters (i.e pressure and temp).
If these are not adjusted night after night , the refraction effect should be  a "factor" not requiring modeling.
It should be just calculated.
Am I missing something?
Thank you again,
Andrea

Robert Chozick




Re: Pelican Nebula and M33

Stuart <stuart.j.heggie@...>
 

Robert, you are right, we did talk about this before - I forgot - apologies!

I appreciate the detailed description of your workflow. I tend to start in PI and move to PS only at the end. I've not had enough (any?) experience with Nebulosity to know what it does but I've heard lots of good things about it.

For sure this is art more than science. Especially when it comes to "pretty pictures". I was very curious if you found the OSC camera made it easier or harder to achieve a pleasing balance. Either way, the steps you describe give you the control you need to produce the image you're looking for. I think both were very pleasing. Just curious about the colour balance using a OSC. 


On Sat, 1 Aug 2020 at 23:00, Robert Chozick via groups.io <rchozick=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Thanks Stuart.  I think we have had this discussion before.  I do use Photometric Color Calibration in PI.  I pre process in Nebulosity (I am a Mac user) then I go to PI and use SCNR to remove green, Photometric Color Calibration and DBE.  Then I go back to Nebulosity to use its Digital Development for its final stretch to a 16 bit Tiff for Photoshop.  Then I finish the rest of the way in Photoshop.  I have attached what M33 looked like when it went to Photoshop:


I did a quick processing in Photoshop without the galaxy color change described below.  I just took a bit of green out.


When I do galaxies I use Curves in Photoshop to bring up the red in the core and blue in the arms.  These are slight adjustments at specific points with the opposite color being reduced where the other is increased.  I manually play to create which part of the galaxy becomes core and which part starts the arms.  I know this is not kosher to many but I am not trying for exact reproduction.  I think of it as art more than science.  In the end I am not trying to get the exact colors just what looks nice to me.  I do think I overdid it the effect on this one.

Again the version I posted tonight


I did M33 a while ago without doing the color correction.  This one was LRGB plus a good amount of Ha.


I intend to get a lot more subs of M33 and also adding Ha.  The one I posted tonight was really only meant to be a test of the new camera.

Robert

On Aug 1, 2020, at 8:09 PM, Stuart <stuart.j.heggie@...> wrote:

Robert, both of these shots are really nice! I have been going back and forth on them and wonder about the constraints that OSC cameras put on you for colour. How do you calibrate them for colour? I shoot monochrome with filters and use PixInsight's PhotometricColorCalibration tool which is simply amazing. 

I mention this because the M33 shot seems like it could stand a tweak on colour but not an arbitrary one to "make it look like everyone else's". You mention that you use PixInsight. Have you tried that calibration tool?


On Sat, 1 Aug 2020 at 16:48, Robert Chozick via groups.io <rchozick=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I got a few more images from my test trip for my new ASI2600 CMOS color camera. 

Pelican Nebula

The bright stars in the Pelican got blown out and really unfixable with the shorter exposure subs so I learned that 5 min at f5 is too much with this camera when bright stars are present.  There was also a reflection in the right upper corner that I think I can fix by bringing the UV-IR filter closer to the sensor.  On the FSQ the CA-35 camera adapter allows a 2 inch filter to be screwed in but it is 30-40mm away from the sensor.  I am getting a ZWO filter drawer to bring it closer.  Hopefully that will fix it. 


M33

I needed more data on M33 and some Ha but I was surprised at the quality of the data for only 2.5 hours.


I need to try to always get more data on images.  In the past I have wanted to get a lot of images on every trip since it is so rare I go but I am going to try to get at least 5-6 hours of data at f5 and 8-12 hours at f8 from now on.

Robert Chozick






--

Stuart
http://www.astrofoto.ca/stuartheggie/

Robert Chozick




--

Stuart
http://www.astrofoto.ca/stuartheggie/


Re: Pelican Nebula and M33

Robert Chozick
 

Thanks Stuart.  I think we have had this discussion before.  I do use Photometric Color Calibration in PI.  I pre process in Nebulosity (I am a Mac user) then I go to PI and use SCNR to remove green, Photometric Color Calibration and DBE.  Then I go back to Nebulosity to use its Digital Development for its final stretch to a 16 bit Tiff for Photoshop.  Then I finish the rest of the way in Photoshop.  I have attached what M33 looked like when it went to Photoshop:


I did a quick processing in Photoshop without the galaxy color change described below.  I just took a bit of green out.


When I do galaxies I use Curves in Photoshop to bring up the red in the core and blue in the arms.  These are slight adjustments at specific points with the opposite color being reduced where the other is increased.  I manually play to create which part of the galaxy becomes core and which part starts the arms.  I know this is not kosher to many but I am not trying for exact reproduction.  I think of it as art more than science.  In the end I am not trying to get the exact colors just what looks nice to me.  I do think I overdid it the effect on this one.

Again the version I posted tonight


I did M33 a while ago without doing the color correction.  This one was LRGB plus a good amount of Ha.


I intend to get a lot more subs of M33 and also adding Ha.  The one I posted tonight was really only meant to be a test of the new camera.

Robert

On Aug 1, 2020, at 8:09 PM, Stuart <stuart.j.heggie@...> wrote:

Robert, both of these shots are really nice! I have been going back and forth on them and wonder about the constraints that OSC cameras put on you for colour. How do you calibrate them for colour? I shoot monochrome with filters and use PixInsight's PhotometricColorCalibration tool which is simply amazing. 

I mention this because the M33 shot seems like it could stand a tweak on colour but not an arbitrary one to "make it look like everyone else's". You mention that you use PixInsight. Have you tried that calibration tool?


On Sat, 1 Aug 2020 at 16:48, Robert Chozick via groups.io <rchozick=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I got a few more images from my test trip for my new ASI2600 CMOS color camera. 

Pelican Nebula

The bright stars in the Pelican got blown out and really unfixable with the shorter exposure subs so I learned that 5 min at f5 is too much with this camera when bright stars are present.  There was also a reflection in the right upper corner that I think I can fix by bringing the UV-IR filter closer to the sensor.  On the FSQ the CA-35 camera adapter allows a 2 inch filter to be screwed in but it is 30-40mm away from the sensor.  I am getting a ZWO filter drawer to bring it closer.  Hopefully that will fix it. 


M33

I needed more data on M33 and some Ha but I was surprised at the quality of the data for only 2.5 hours.


I need to try to always get more data on images.  In the past I have wanted to get a lot of images on every trip since it is so rare I go but I am going to try to get at least 5-6 hours of data at f5 and 8-12 hours at f8 from now on.

Robert Chozick






--

Stuart
http://www.astrofoto.ca/stuartheggie/

Robert Chozick



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