Date   

Re: Preventing tracking on power up?

Tom Blahovici
 

Hi
When I turn the power on, apcc is not started. I need to open it and then it automatically connects. Then tracking starts.
I searched everywhere in apcc and could not find anything to stop this from happening. I may have missed it though. I will check the hand controller. I guess I don't really need it anymore.
Snowing now, so the next opportunity I will check the hand controller.
Thanks, Tom


Re: consistent goto error on meridian flip w/1200

Manusfisch
 

Steven P, thanks for that informed analysis of your problem and your solution.  these kinds of posts really help us pilgrims.  This whole thread is one that both informs and teaches quite well.  I appreciate the incredible brain power and innovative problem solving that occurs in amateur astronomy and am in complete awe of the Astro-Physics crew for always perfecting their craft. Innovation, freedom of thought, a bit of dreaming and wishing all add up  to a great experience for a hobby relatively new to me.   Tom Fischer, Indy


Re: Preventing tracking on power up?

Roland Christen
 

How are you starting the mount? With keypad or APCC?
keypad can be set for Autoconnect = NO, which will not start the mount upon power up, assuming it has been parked the previous session.
APCC can also be set to not start tracking on power up.
The ASCOM driver can also be set to not start on power up.

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Blahovici <tom.va2fsq@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Sun, Nov 22, 2020 12:44 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] Preventing tracking on power up?

Hi
It seems that even though the mount is parked at the end of the evening, and then the power is turned off, when the power is turned on, the mount automatically starts tracking.  This is an issue for me since the telescope is covered and I want to power up everything before uncovering it.
I am using APCC and have a CP4.  Is this a hand control issue?
Thanks, Tom

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: Preventing tracking on power up?

Ray Gralak
 

Hi Tom,

The mount should not unpark and start tracking by itself. Is APCC running and initializing the mount when powered on?

Is this a hand control issue?
If you are using APCC, you should configure the hand controller for external initialization or disconnect the hand controller.

-Ray Gralak
Author of PEMPro
Author of APCC (Astro-Physics Command Center): https://www.astro-physics.com/apcc-pro
Author of Astro-Physics V2 ASCOM Driver: https://www.siriusimaging.com/apdriver


-----Original Message-----
From: main@ap-gto.groups.io [mailto:main@ap-gto.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tom Blahovici
Sent: Sunday, November 22, 2020 10:44 AM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: [ap-gto] Preventing tracking on power up?

Hi
It seems that even though the mount is parked at the end of the evening, and then the power is turned off, when the
power is turned on, the mount automatically starts tracking. This is an issue for me since the telescope is covered
and I want to power up everything before uncovering it.
I am using APCC and have a CP4. Is this a hand control issue?
Thanks, Tom


Preventing tracking on power up?

Tom Blahovici
 

Hi
It seems that even though the mount is parked at the end of the evening, and then the power is turned off, when the power is turned on, the mount automatically starts tracking.  This is an issue for me since the telescope is covered and I want to power up everything before uncovering it.
I am using APCC and have a CP4.  Is this a hand control issue?
Thanks, Tom


Re: consistent goto error on meridian flip w/1200

Christopher Erickson
 

Congratulations!


On Sun, Nov 22, 2020 at 4:51 AM Steven Panish <scpanish@...> wrote:
Last night I used the ConeSharp program with spectacular results.  This is a free product from the SharpCap team (Robin Glover et. al.).  It uses a semi automated procedure to put a target star offset from center and you then adjust the source of the orthogonality error (the dovetail rail on the C9.25 in my case) to recenter the image.  Shimming is kind of miserable and crude.  At some point when/if the scope is off the mount I'll put adjustment screws on the rail.  Even so, the results are impressive.  The program reported my initial error as 14+ minutes.  I'm not sure how that relates to the error that was on the sensor, which was much larger.  After a lot of careful shimming and 3 iterations of the procedure, reported error was 37 seconds.  A goto halfway across the sky including a meridian flip had the target on the sensor and off-center by about 8 minutes (guestimate).  

My thanks for the advice.

Steve


Re: APCC on a two-user Win10pro PC

Ray Gralak
 

David,

The two accounts are for the two of us to use the scopes at different times, as such they would never be used
concurrently and because they are controlling the exact same mount hardware the settings would be the same. Would
this make it feasible?
You probably could get this to work, but I would not recommend it.

And since this is not a supported configuration, if there are any problems we might not be able to help. Note that this also affects
the AP V2 ASCOM driver settings. Even things like the park position, meridian limits, pointing models, etc. are all in one folder
location, and are thus shared by all login accounts.

That being said, we could look into changing the folder locations so that APCC could support independent installations for different
login accounts on the same computer.

Obviously I'm still concerned with the virtual ports. If created by one user would they carry over to the other user
given that they are at the OS level? (I believe??). any thoughts on this aspect also?
No need to worry; the virtual ports will be exactly the same for both accounts, as the port numbers are read from a common settings
file and are created at APCC runtime and destroyed when APCC exits.

-Ray Gralak
Author of PEMPro
Author of APCC (Astro-Physics Command Center): https://www.astro-physics.com/apcc-pro
Author of Astro-Physics V2 ASCOM Driver: https://www.siriusimaging.com/apdriver

-----Original Message-----
From: main@ap-gto.groups.io [mailto:main@ap-gto.groups.io] On Behalf Of David Churchill
Sent: Sunday, November 22, 2020 8:46 AM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] APCC on a two-user Win10pro PC

Unfortunately, APCC stores settings in the same place for both users, so using it in this manner would be impossible,
or at best,
extremely inconvenient.

Also, you cannot run more than one instance of APCC at the same time, even from different accounts, as the settings
would become
mixed and produce indeterminate behavior.

Ray,

Thanks for this.

The two accounts are for the two of us to use the scopes at different times, as such they would never be used
concurrently and because they are controlling the exact same mount hardware the settings would be the same. Would
this make it feasible?

Obviously I'm still concerned with the virtual ports. If created by one user would they carry over to the other user
given that they are at the OS level? (I believe??). any thoughts on this aspect also?

Many thanks

David



--

David Churchill

Email: dachurchill@cox.net <mailto:dachurchill@cox.net>
Astro Images: http://www.skyimager.net <http://www.skyimager.net>




Re: APCC on a two-user Win10pro PC

David Churchill
 

Unfortunately, APCC stores settings in the same place for both users, so using it in this manner would be impossible, or at best,
extremely inconvenient.

Also, you cannot run more than one instance of APCC at the same time, even from different accounts, as the settings would become
mixed and produce indeterminate behavior.

Ray,

Thanks for this.

The two accounts are for the two of us to use the scopes at different times, as such they would never be used concurrently and because they are controlling the exact same mount hardware the settings would be the same. Would this make it feasible?

Obviously I’m still concerned with the virtual ports… If created by one user would they carry over to the other user given that they are at the OS level? (I believe??)… any thoughts on this aspect also?

Many thanks

David

 

--
 
David Churchill
 
Email:          dachurchill@...
Astro Images:   http://www.skyimager.net

 


Re: consistent goto error on meridian flip w/1200

Steven Panish
 

Last night I used the ConeSharp program with spectacular results.  This is a free product from the SharpCap team (Robin Glover et. al.).  It uses a semi automated procedure to put a target star offset from center and you then adjust the source of the orthogonality error (the dovetail rail on the C9.25 in my case) to recenter the image.  Shimming is kind of miserable and crude.  At some point when/if the scope is off the mount I'll put adjustment screws on the rail.  Even so, the results are impressive.  The program reported my initial error as 14+ minutes.  I'm not sure how that relates to the error that was on the sensor, which was much larger.  After a lot of careful shimming and 3 iterations of the procedure, reported error was 37 seconds.  A goto halfway across the sky including a meridian flip had the target on the sensor and off-center by about 8 minutes (guestimate).  

My thanks for the advice.

Steve


Re: Congratulations to NASA and SpaceX!

Steven Panish
 

I share these concerns, and deplore Musk's reckless and self-centered behaviour.  Witness as well how he has responded to the C19 pandemic.  No Tesla products for me!  He undeniably delivers.  But remember who made the trains run on time.

Steve


Re: Stainless Steel Insert for Counterweight Shaft Threads

Harley Davidson
 

Thank you M Hambrick for those kind words!

tony

On 11/19/2020 8:56 AM, M Hambrick wrote:
Hi Harold

Scroll down through the messages in this (AP-GTO) group and find the message on November 10 from Harley Davidson (a.k.a. Tony). There is a link to his You-Tube video there.

Tony has made several really good videos over the years. They are worth watching.


Re: Soul Nebula / Westerhout 5 SHO

christian viladrich
 

This is splendid. Well done !

Christian

Le 15/11/2020 à 20:25, Dale Ghent a écrit :
I had a rash of clear nights with passable seeing the past week, so I managed to get 32 hours of data on the Soul Nebula

130GTX, Mach1, QHY600.

https://www.astrobin.com/full/x6124n/0/






Re: Congratulations to NASA and SpaceX!

Seb@stro
 


But at the time these treaties were ratified (1960-1990), crawling space with tens of thousands of satellites within a few years was probably not a preoccupation.

I would also be surprised these were seriously considered by Elon at the “foc-us“ group meeting when they had the idea of interconnecting the rainforest to the Internet...

But what do I know. ;-)

Le 21 nov. 2020 à 23:55, Christopher Erickson <christopher.k.erickson@...> a écrit :


IIRC, there IS a UN committee that works on international treaties about space activities. Before that there were space treaties between the USA and USSR. Then the EU got in the game. Then India, China, etc.

Just like there are international treaties and international entities that manage radio frequencies and also international waters and maritime laws.

On Sat, Nov 21, 2020 at 6:45 PM Don Anderson via groups.io <jockey_ca=yahoo.ca@groups.io> wrote:
Ya gotta wonder who gets to decide who gets to use the space around our planet. I doesn't look like there was any international consultation or approval process for this SpaceX adventure. Elon is his own authority. SpaceX isn't the only organization planning these mega constellations either.

Don Anderson


On Saturday, November 21, 2020, 09:18:53 p.m. MST, Seb@stro <sebastiendore1@...> wrote:



Hi Karen, hi all,

As impressive and full of proudness to U.S. people this technical accomplishment might be, let’s not forget that this very same company (SpaceX) is on the verge of “obscuring” the stars for centuries to come with its 42 000 very bright satellites megaconstellation being launched every two weeks now and ongoing in the months / years to come.

This may not seem that big of a number to most us who are used to astronomical scales but as a comparison point, there are about 3000 active satellites in the sky right now. As another point of reference, the human unaided eye can see about 4500 star in a dark sky. Just imagine the effect on our long exposures of increasing tenfold that number but of bright and moving objects in between the stars...

Many predict it’ll be devastating to any radio and visual astrophotography, be it amateur or professional... If that proves to be the case, it might sadly be one of those “hope for the best” moment in regards to the hobby we all cherish.

Very “dark” ages to come in astronomy indeed. Better capture what you can, while you can... 🙁


Sébastien



Le 16 nov. 2020 à 12:13, Karen Christen <karen@...> a écrit :



Congratulations (once again!) to the NASA and SpaceX team on the successful launch of the Resilience Crew Dragon from Kennedy Space Center to the International Space Station this evening!  What an incredible feat! 

 

From all of us at AP, our very best wishes for a safe journey and arrival at the ISS.

Karen

AP


--
Karen Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: Congratulations to NASA and SpaceX!

Don Anderson
 

Doesn't look like the international astronomical community had much if any influence on the decisions. When the concerns were first raised, Elon's answer was "they can image from space" it was only later that any effort was made to darken the satellites. The other worry is the elevated risk of collisions and cascading proliferation of space debris (aka movie Gravity). This could deny humanity access to space for generations to come.  

Don Anderson


On Saturday, November 21, 2020, 09:55:38 p.m. MST, Christopher Erickson <christopher.k.erickson@...> wrote:


IIRC, there IS a UN committee that works on international treaties about space activities. Before that there were space treaties between the USA and USSR. Then the EU got in the game. Then India, China, etc.

Just like there are international treaties and international entities that manage radio frequencies and also international waters and maritime laws.

On Sat, Nov 21, 2020 at 6:45 PM Don Anderson via groups.io <jockey_ca=yahoo.ca@groups.io> wrote:
Ya gotta wonder who gets to decide who gets to use the space around our planet. I doesn't look like there was any international consultation or approval process for this SpaceX adventure. Elon is his own authority. SpaceX isn't the only organization planning these mega constellations either.

Don Anderson


On Saturday, November 21, 2020, 09:18:53 p.m. MST, Seb@stro <sebastiendore1@...> wrote:



Hi Karen, hi all,

As impressive and full of proudness to U.S. people this technical accomplishment might be, let’s not forget that this very same company (SpaceX) is on the verge of “obscuring” the stars for centuries to come with its 42 000 very bright satellites megaconstellation being launched every two weeks now and ongoing in the months / years to come.

This may not seem that big of a number to most us who are used to astronomical scales but as a comparison point, there are about 3000 active satellites in the sky right now. As another point of reference, the human unaided eye can see about 4500 star in a dark sky. Just imagine the effect on our long exposures of increasing tenfold that number but of bright and moving objects in between the stars...

Many predict it’ll be devastating to any radio and visual astrophotography, be it amateur or professional... If that proves to be the case, it might sadly be one of those “hope for the best” moment in regards to the hobby we all cherish.

Very “dark” ages to come in astronomy indeed. Better capture what you can, while you can... 🙁


Sébastien



Le 16 nov. 2020 à 12:13, Karen Christen <karen@...> a écrit :



Congratulations (once again!) to the NASA and SpaceX team on the successful launch of the Resilience Crew Dragon from Kennedy Space Center to the International Space Station this evening!  What an incredible feat! 

 

From all of us at AP, our very best wishes for a safe journey and arrival at the ISS.

Karen

AP


--
Karen Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: Congratulations to NASA and SpaceX!

Christopher Erickson
 

IIRC, there IS a UN committee that works on international treaties about space activities. Before that there were space treaties between the USA and USSR. Then the EU got in the game. Then India, China, etc.

Just like there are international treaties and international entities that manage radio frequencies and also international waters and maritime laws.

On Sat, Nov 21, 2020 at 6:45 PM Don Anderson via groups.io <jockey_ca=yahoo.ca@groups.io> wrote:
Ya gotta wonder who gets to decide who gets to use the space around our planet. I doesn't look like there was any international consultation or approval process for this SpaceX adventure. Elon is his own authority. SpaceX isn't the only organization planning these mega constellations either.

Don Anderson


On Saturday, November 21, 2020, 09:18:53 p.m. MST, Seb@stro <sebastiendore1@...> wrote:



Hi Karen, hi all,

As impressive and full of proudness to U.S. people this technical accomplishment might be, let’s not forget that this very same company (SpaceX) is on the verge of “obscuring” the stars for centuries to come with its 42 000 very bright satellites megaconstellation being launched every two weeks now and ongoing in the months / years to come.

This may not seem that big of a number to most us who are used to astronomical scales but as a comparison point, there are about 3000 active satellites in the sky right now. As another point of reference, the human unaided eye can see about 4500 star in a dark sky. Just imagine the effect on our long exposures of increasing tenfold that number but of bright and moving objects in between the stars...

Many predict it’ll be devastating to any radio and visual astrophotography, be it amateur or professional... If that proves to be the case, it might sadly be one of those “hope for the best” moment in regards to the hobby we all cherish.

Very “dark” ages to come in astronomy indeed. Better capture what you can, while you can... 🙁


Sébastien



Le 16 nov. 2020 à 12:13, Karen Christen <karen@...> a écrit :



Congratulations (once again!) to the NASA and SpaceX team on the successful launch of the Resilience Crew Dragon from Kennedy Space Center to the International Space Station this evening!  What an incredible feat! 

 

From all of us at AP, our very best wishes for a safe journey and arrival at the ISS.

Karen

AP


--
Karen Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: Congratulations to NASA and SpaceX!

Don Anderson
 

Ya gotta wonder who gets to decide who gets to use the space around our planet. I doesn't look like there was any international consultation or approval process for this SpaceX adventure. Elon is his own authority. SpaceX isn't the only organization planning these mega constellations either.

Don Anderson


On Saturday, November 21, 2020, 09:18:53 p.m. MST, Seb@stro <sebastiendore1@...> wrote:



Hi Karen, hi all,

As impressive and full of proudness to U.S. people this technical accomplishment might be, let’s not forget that this very same company (SpaceX) is on the verge of “obscuring” the stars for centuries to come with its 42 000 very bright satellites megaconstellation being launched every two weeks now and ongoing in the months / years to come.

This may not seem that big of a number to most us who are used to astronomical scales but as a comparison point, there are about 3000 active satellites in the sky right now. As another point of reference, the human unaided eye can see about 4500 star in a dark sky. Just imagine the effect on our long exposures of increasing tenfold that number but of bright and moving objects in between the stars...

Many predict it’ll be devastating to any radio and visual astrophotography, be it amateur or professional... If that proves to be the case, it might sadly be one of those “hope for the best” moment in regards to the hobby we all cherish.

Very “dark” ages to come in astronomy indeed. Better capture what you can, while you can... 🙁


Sébastien

link: https://theconversation.com/spacexs-starlink-satellites-are-about-to-ruin-stargazing-for-everyone-149516


Le 16 nov. 2020 à 12:13, Karen Christen <karen@...> a écrit :



Congratulations (once again!) to the NASA and SpaceX team on the successful launch of the Resilience Crew Dragon from Kennedy Space Center to the International Space Station this evening!  What an incredible feat! 

 

From all of us at AP, our very best wishes for a safe journey and arrival at the ISS.

Karen

AP


--
Karen Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: Congratulations to NASA and SpaceX!

Seb@stro
 


Hi Karen, hi all,

As impressive and full of proudness to U.S. people this technical accomplishment might be, let’s not forget that this very same company (SpaceX) is on the verge of “obscuring” the stars for centuries to come with its 42 000 very bright satellites megaconstellation being launched every two weeks now and ongoing in the months / years to come.

This may not seem that big of a number to most us who are used to astronomical scales but as a comparison point, there are about 3000 active satellites in the sky right now. As another point of reference, the human unaided eye can see about 4500 star in a dark sky. Just imagine the effect on our long exposures of increasing tenfold that number but of bright and moving objects in between the stars...

Many predict it’ll be devastating to any radio and visual astrophotography, be it amateur or professional... If that proves to be the case, it might sadly be one of those “hope for the best” moment in regards to the hobby we all cherish.

Very “dark” ages to come in astronomy indeed. Better capture what you can, while you can... 🙁


Sébastien

link: https://theconversation.com/spacexs-starlink-satellites-are-about-to-ruin-stargazing-for-everyone-149516


Le 16 nov. 2020 à 12:13, Karen Christen <karen@...> a écrit :



Congratulations (once again!) to the NASA and SpaceX team on the successful launch of the Resilience Crew Dragon from Kennedy Space Center to the International Space Station this evening!  What an incredible feat! 

 

From all of us at AP, our very best wishes for a safe journey and arrival at the ISS.

Karen

AP


--
Karen Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: APCC on a two-user Win10pro PC

Ray Gralak
 
Edited

David,

Unfortunately, APCC stores settings in the same place for both users, so using it in this manner would be impossible, or at best,
extremely inconvenient.

Also, you cannot run more than one instance of APCC at the same time, even from different accounts, as the settings would become
mixed and produce indeterminate behavior.

-Ray Gralak
Author of PEMPro
Author of APCC (Astro-Physics Command Center): https://www.astro-physics.com/apcc-pro
Author of Astro-Physics V2 ASCOM Driver: https://www.siriusimaging.com/apdriver

-----Original Message-----
From: main@ap-gto.groups.io [mailto:main@ap-gto.groups.io] On Behalf Of David Churchill
Sent: Saturday, November 21, 2020 4:28 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: [ap-gto] APCC on a two-user Win10pro PC

I want to install APCC at my remote observing site. The PC is a two user PC so that two of us can use the scope
independently at their assigned times. It's setup and running well with the AP V2 Driver, but I want to now install
APCC-Std and so wanted to check if this has been tested/used in the manner I am intending? - AP1600GTO/CP4
(although I'm not sure the specific mount matters here?)

Has anyone out there installed APCC on a single machine with two user accounts with both having access to run it
as a complete imaging system? If so was there anything special that was needed? Or does the install on one user
become enabled for the other user?

Maybe this is a question for Ray? One concern is with the virtual ports. Having enabled them on the one user, will
they become available for the other? Do I need to setup virtual ports for both independently?

Any experience, insights and/or guidance is greatly appreciated.

Thanks

David



--

David Churchill

Email: dachurchill@cox.net <mailto:dachurchill@cox.net>
Astro Images: http://www.skyimager.net <http://www.skyimager.net>




APCC on a two-user Win10pro PC

David Churchill
 

I want to install APCC at my remote observing site. The PC is a two user PC so that two of us can use the scope independently at their assigned times. It’s setup and running well with the AP V2 Driver, but I want to now install APCC-Std and so wanted to check if this has been tested/used in the manner I am intending? – AP1600GTO/CP4 (although I’m not sure the specific mount matters here?)

Has anyone out there installed APCC on a single machine with two user accounts with both having access to run it as a complete imaging system? If so was there anything special that was needed? Or does the install on one user become enabled for the other user?

Maybe this is a question for Ray? One concern is with the virtual ports. Having enabled them on the one user, will they become available for the other? Do I need to setup virtual ports for both independently?

Any experience, insights and/or guidance is greatly appreciated.

Thanks

David

 

--
 
David Churchill
 
Email:          dachurchill@...
Astro Images:   http://www.skyimager.net

 


Re: #APCC Pro and Polar alignment on #Mach2GTO #APCC

 

Although I wouldn't recommend it, our first setup polar alignment was several *hundred* arcmin off and APCC was still able to correct it reasonably well. 


On Sat, Nov 21, 2020 at 12:08 PM KHursh via groups.io <khursh=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Let's assume somewhere between 1 and 2 arc-min of error. Will APPM correct that or does it need to be tighter?



--
Brian 



Brian Valente

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