Date   

RAPAS for use in the South

Bob
 

Anyone in the Southern H. using the RAPAS? Can you use it effectively in light polluted skies?

Thanks
Bob


Re: Time for some eye candy

 

bah - you are such a tease!


On Sun, Feb 7, 2021 at 9:48 PM Tom Blahovici <tom.va2fsq@...> wrote:
Hi
Not yet.  Debating about Astrobin
The full image is 2.9 GBytes! But it will print nicely up to 4' x 6'.  Those big mpixel cameras are quite impressive.
Tom



--
Brian 



Brian Valente


Re: Time for some eye candy

Don Anderson
 

Great image Tom.

Don Anderson


On Sunday, February 7, 2021, 09:52:27 p.m. MST, Tom Blahovici <tom.va2fsq@...> wrote:


Hi
Just thought I would share my first image with an ASI6200mm camera. This camera is 62mpixel CMOS with next to no noise compared to my previous STL11000.
This was guided with an ASI290 off axis with my old AP600e and a CP4. Thanks for all the support getting to this point.
18 hours, 6 Ha, 6 OR and 6 S2 from the Bottle 8 sky's of Montreal.


Re: First light for a new camera

Don Anderson
 

Nice catch Dean! Turned out pretty good considering the challenging conditions. Would be interesting to see the same target using an IMX571 based camera.

Don Anderson


On Sunday, February 7, 2021, 04:28:07 p.m. MST, Dean Jacobsen <deanjacobsen@...> wrote:


Hi All,

A couple of new mono CMOS cameras have come out over the last few months.  First a 4/3" sized camera using the back illuminated IMX492 and then most recently cameras using the back illuminated APS-C sized IMX571 sensor.

Both offer a substantial upgrade from my well loved ASI1600MM.  I ended up purchasing the ASI294MM-Pro with the 4/3" sized sensor.

The weather here in coastal Southern California hasn't been cooperating with me the last week or so but I did manage to get about 1.9 hours [29 x 240s] parked on the Rosette as a first light for the camera.  The conditions were less than optimal - greater than 85% humidity with milky white skies from the light pollution and the moisture in the air.  Had to shut down after 2 hours before everything got soaked when the approaching fog rolled in.

Here is a link to my 2 hour hydrogen alpha shot of the Rosette taken with the ASI294MM Pro and the FSQ-106 at f/5.  The full resolution image has been posted.  This image was just stacked and stretched.  No noise reduction or deconvolution.

https://www.astrobin.com/full/0ffdnz/C/ 

The ASI294MM Pro does a nice job, and at $1480 it gives great performance for the price in my opinion.  The body of the new camera has the same dimensions as my ASI1600MM so I was able to simply unscrew the ASI1600 from the filter wheel and screw the ASI294MM on.

The Mach2 and APCC performed flawlessly as usual.

Thanks for looking.
--
Dean Jacobsen
http://astrophoto.net/wp/
Image Gallery - http://astrophoto.net/wp/image-gallery/
Astrobin Image Gallery - https://www.astrobin.com/users/deanjacobsen/ 
Amateur Radio Call Sign - W6DBJ


Re: Time for some eye candy

Tom Blahovici
 

Hi
Not yet.  Debating about Astrobin
The full image is 2.9 GBytes! But it will print nicely up to 4' x 6'.  Those big mpixel cameras are quite impressive.
Tom


Re: Dec limit in Mach2

Ray Gralak
 

Hi Luca,

At this point, it appears that a plausible explanation for the behavior I encountered was an instability in APCC due
to some stale files when I switched from the Mach1 to the Mach2. Hopefully reinstalling APCC has taken care of
the problem for good.
I'm glad that resetting the configuration solved the problem!

The behavior you witnessed was almost certainly because your Mach 1 settings were configured with "Mount Declination Limits" enabled with the action "Bounce back within limits and Park". These settings were in the ZIP file you provided previously, but I didn't think to look at the APCC settings until later. When you connected, the Mach2 position values, which are completely unrelated to your Mach1's, happened to be immediately past the limit you had configured for your Mach 1. This caused APCC to try to "bounce back within limits and park".

So, this was not an "instability in APCC". However, the A-P documentation should probably point out that because of the some differences between the Mach 2 and other mounts, that any previous APCC configuration should saved if you later plan to use that mount. Then, for the Mach 2, the APCC configuration should be cleared and setup again for the Mach 2.

-Ray Gralak
Author of PEMPro
Author of APCC (Astro-Physics Command Center): https://www.astro-physics.com/apcc-pro
Author of Astro-Physics V2 ASCOM Driver: https://www.siriusimaging.com/apdriver

-----Original Message-----
From: main@ap-gto.groups.io [mailto:main@ap-gto.groups.io] On Behalf Of Luca Marinelli
Sent: Sunday, February 7, 2021 7:12 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Dec limit in Mach2

Circling back on the runaway Dec axis issue when APCC connects to the mount. On Friday, I went ahead and
completely uninstalled APCC, including deleting the folders with all the APCC data and log files - I only copied
the horizon and meridian limit files to the Desktop so I could reload them later. I then proceeded to reinstall
APCC from scratch. I reloaded the meridian and horizon limits and then tested the mount. Everything worked
fine, APCC connected to the mount without inducing a Dec axis rotation. I imaged on Friday, Saturday nights and
I just launched another imaging run tonight. In all cases APCC connected to the mount without problems.

At this point, it appears that a plausible explanation for the behavior I encountered was an instability in APCC due
to some stale files when I switched from the Mach1 to the Mach2. Hopefully reinstalling APCC has taken care of
the problem for good.

Thank you to everyone for the advice!

Luca


Re: How Good Can Guiding be With Non-AE Mount

Worsel
 

Mike

From the factory, my 1100 (2016 - non-AE) PE was 7 a-s peak to peak, which is within spec.  After using Ray Gralak's PemPro to analyze and load a PEC curve, the PE is 1.1 a-s P-P.  The upshot is that it is much easier for PHD2 (or any guide software) to guide out that error than the 7 a-s p-p value.

Also, I get RMS values ranging from .4 to .8 a-s using PHD2 (OAG - ZWO 174), which, given the seeing, are equivalent as far as round stars.  Your value for that one example is excellent.

Bryan


Re: Time for some eye candy

 

Wonderful image Tom

do you have a link to full resolution? i'm guessing that is chock full of details

Brian

On Sun, Feb 7, 2021 at 8:52 PM Tom Blahovici <tom.va2fsq@...> wrote:
Hi
Just thought I would share my first image with an ASI6200mm camera. This camera is 62mpixel CMOS with next to no noise compared to my previous STL11000.
This was guided with an ASI290 off axis with my old AP600e and a CP4. Thanks for all the support getting to this point.
18 hours, 6 Ha, 6 OR and 6 S2 from the Bottle 8 sky's of Montreal.



--
Brian 



Brian Valente


Time for some eye candy

Tom Blahovici
 

Hi
Just thought I would share my first image with an ASI6200mm camera. This camera is 62mpixel CMOS with next to no noise compared to my previous STL11000.
This was guided with an ASI290 off axis with my old AP600e and a CP4. Thanks for all the support getting to this point.
18 hours, 6 Ha, 6 OR and 6 S2 from the Bottle 8 sky's of Montreal.


Re: How Good Can Guiding be With Non-AE Mount

Mike Dodd
 

On 2/7/2021 10:13 PM, M Hambrick wrote:

Yes, I use MaxIm DL Pro for imaging and guiding. [...]

I recently set up configurations for all of my scope / camera
combinations in MaxIm so that I can set up the guiding graph to display
the error in arc-seconds, but until now I have not done this.
I recommend doing that; see below.

I think I
saw a recent comment from Roland where he stated that he normally
displays his guiding graph in pixels because that is what the camera sees.
I displayed pixels, but then it occurred to me that pixels and plate scale on the guide camera have no relation to pixels and plate scale on the imaging camera, so why display guide camera pixels?

I use arc seconds because an arc second is an an arc second on both cameras. No mental gymnastics to go from one to the other.

I know what the plate scale is on my ASI-1600 imaging camera (0.8 arcsec/px) so if I see a guiding error of 0.6 arcsec RMS, I know that's less than one pixel on the imaging camera, and that's what I care about.

I have also been experimenting with the guide exposure time and exposure
delay to see if I can do better.
I use ACP automation software, and it sets the exposure based on guide star brightness. It also doesn't begin an exposure until the error is within a specified limit. Then MaxIm applies a settling delay before opening the shutter.

With my setup, I get good guiding with a 1-second exposure and a guide star SNR above 50.

--- Mike


Re: How Good Can Guiding be With Non-AE Mount

M Hambrick
 

Hi Mike Thanks for the comments.

Yes, I use MaxIm DL Pro for imaging and guiding. I always use a separate guide scope piggybacked on top of the main imaging scope (in spite of Roland's recommendations against doing so to avoid flexure). My guide scope is a Tele-Vue Pronto (70 mm, f 6.86). I had been using a SBIG ST-i as my guide camera, but more recently I started guiding with my old ST2000-XM. It is much easier to find a guide star with this 2 megapixel camera.

On my main imaging camera (SBIG STXL16200) I have the SBIG FW8G-STXL filter wheel which has an off-axis guide chip located in front of the filters, but I have never been able to get the off-axis chip to image anything. I think I am doing something wrong, but I have decided to switch over to a standard filter wheel without the guider to get some extra backfocus.

I recently set up configurations for all of my scope / camera combinations in MaxIm so that I can set up the guiding graph to display the error in arc-seconds, but until now I have not done this. I think I saw a recent comment from Roland where he stated that he normally displays his guiding graph in pixels because that is what the camera sees.

I have owned the 1100 GTO mount since 2017, but I never updated the PEC that was set up with the mount at the factory. I am not sure if this is necessary, and I am not sure how to do this if it is required.

I have also been experimenting with the guide exposure time and exposure delay to see if I can do better.

Mike


Re: Dec limit in Mach2

Luca Marinelli
 

Circling back on the runaway Dec axis issue when APCC connects to the mount. On Friday, I went ahead and completely uninstalled APCC, including deleting the folders with all the APCC data and log files - I only copied the horizon and meridian limit files to the Desktop so I could reload them later. I then proceeded to reinstall APCC from scratch. I reloaded the meridian and horizon limits and then tested the mount. Everything worked fine, APCC connected to the mount without inducing a Dec axis rotation. I imaged on Friday, Saturday nights and I just launched another imaging run tonight. In all cases APCC connected to the mount without problems.

At this point, it appears that a plausible explanation for the behavior I encountered was an instability in APCC due to some stale files when I switched from the Mach1 to the Mach2. Hopefully reinstalling APCC has taken care of the problem for good. 

Thank you to everyone for the advice!

Luca


Re: First light for a new camera

Dean Jacobsen
 

Thanks guys.

The camera appears to be a great performer for the price.  Definitely a step up from the ASI1600MM with the higher sensitivity and the larger well capacity.

@ Marcelo - Yes, this is the 2x2 bin mode at the HCG transition point of gain 120 with the "standard" unity gain offset of 30.
--
Dean Jacobsen
http://astrophoto.net/wp/
Image Gallery - http://astrophoto.net/wp/image-gallery/
Astrobin Image Gallery - https://www.astrobin.com/users/deanjacobsen/ 
Amateur Radio Call Sign - W6DBJ


Re: First light for a new camera

Luca Marinelli
 

Nice one, Dean!

I have been enjoying imaging with that camera as well. The sensitivity is really impressive.

Luca


Re: First light for a new camera

Benoit Schillings
 

wow. very clean !

-- benoit

On Sun, Feb 7, 2021 at 4:52 PM Marcelo Figueroa via groups.io
<marfig1970=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


Great image.

I'm thinking of doing the same camera upgrade. That' s the normal resolution mode, Bin2 I think, isn't it?


Re: First light for a new camera

Marcelo Figueroa
 


Great image.
 
I'm thinking of doing the same camera upgrade. That' s the normal resolution mode, Bin2 I think, isn't it?


Re: How Good Can Guiding be With Non-AE Mount

Mike Dodd
 

On 2/7/2021 7:23 PM, M Hambrick wrote:
I have a 1100 GTO mount without absolute encoders, and I have been
wondering how good I can expect the guiding to be. The guiding graph
below is pretty typical of what I get. Is this pretty typical, or should
I be able to do better than this ?
Your X-axis RMS is 0.168 (pixels, I assume). At 3.21 arcsec/pixel, that's0.539 arcsec RMS error.

I typically get that or slighter better with my AP-1200 and a separate guide scope/camera. With this guiding performance, I get good images with an image scale of 0.86"/px on my main camera.

Does your guiding software let you specify guider scope and camera parameters, so it will display the guide error graph in arcseconds? I've found that very helpful in MaxIm.

--- Mike
http://astronomy.mdodd.com


How Good Can Guiding be With Non-AE Mount

M Hambrick
 

I  have a 1100 GTO mount without absolute encoders, and I have been wondering how good I can expect the guiding to be. The guiding graph below is pretty typical of what I get. Is this pretty typical, or should I be able to do better than this ?

Suggestions are welcome.

Mike


First light for a new camera

Dean Jacobsen
 

Hi All,

A couple of new mono CMOS cameras have come out over the last few months.  First a 4/3" sized camera using the back illuminated IMX492 and then most recently cameras using the back illuminated APS-C sized IMX571 sensor.

Both offer a substantial upgrade from my well loved ASI1600MM.  I ended up purchasing the ASI294MM-Pro with the 4/3" sized sensor.

The weather here in coastal Southern California hasn't been cooperating with me the last week or so but I did manage to get about 1.9 hours [29 x 240s] parked on the Rosette as a first light for the camera.  The conditions were less than optimal - greater than 85% humidity with milky white skies from the light pollution and the moisture in the air.  Had to shut down after 2 hours before everything got soaked when the approaching fog rolled in.

Here is a link to my 2 hour hydrogen alpha shot of the Rosette taken with the ASI294MM Pro and the FSQ-106 at f/5.  The full resolution image has been posted.  This image was just stacked and stretched.  No noise reduction or deconvolution.

https://www.astrobin.com/full/0ffdnz/C/ 

The ASI294MM Pro does a nice job, and at $1480 it gives great performance for the price in my opinion.  The body of the new camera has the same dimensions as my ASI1600MM so I was able to simply unscrew the ASI1600 from the filter wheel and screw the ASI294MM on.

The Mach2 and APCC performed flawlessly as usual.

Thanks for looking.
--
Dean Jacobsen
http://astrophoto.net/wp/
Image Gallery - http://astrophoto.net/wp/image-gallery/
Astrobin Image Gallery - https://www.astrobin.com/users/deanjacobsen/ 
Amateur Radio Call Sign - W6DBJ


Re: Difference between Recalibrate and Sync

vk3cjk
 

Hello Vladimir,

My understanding is that Sync is something you need to do only once after you initially assemble the mount.  I've done it only once in 12 years since I set up my scope in the observatory.  It helps to keep the scope up and the counterweights down.  

However Recalibrate is something I use every time I use the scope.   It 'fine tunes' the pointing in the region of sky where you are observing.   You simply find a known object, recalibrate on it, then you know that your pointing is going to be pretty good at least in that region.  

Hope that makes sense!

Cheers, Chris

On Mon, Feb 8, 2021 at 6:01 AM Vladimir Steblina <vsteblina@...> wrote:
My friend and I have just about given up on the difference between Sync and Recalibrate with the AP900.

Can somehow explain the difference in terms we can understand?? 

What difference does it make??  When is it appropriate to use one versus the other??  Thanks.

Yep, we read the manual.  English is my fourth language and that is my excuse and I am sticking to it.....however, my friend is a native English speaker!!

Vladimir

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