Date   

Can I recal from the ASCOM driver?

Mike Dodd
 

With an equipment change, I might need to re-balance my AP1200. I've done this before, and am familiar with the procedure to balance in the Park 4 (or Park 1) position, then start up, slew to a star, center it with the keypad buttons, then do a Recal with the keypad.

Buy my keypad is disconnected and stored in the house. I'd rather not hook it up and go through the setup to change from EXT to auto-connect, then back to EXT afterward.

QUESTION: Can I do the Recal from the ASCOM driver window? I see the option to use Recal for Sync, and that's always been checked, but I see no "Recal Now" button.

If not in the ASCOM driver, I'm pretty sure I can use SkyX:
1. Slew to a star.
2. Use the driver's buttons to center the star.
3. Do a Sync in SkyX.

Since the driver is set to use Recal instead of Sync, everything is copacetic, correct?

Thanks for all information.

--- Mike


Re: Mach-1 capacity

Jeff B
 

Based upon my own experiences with my C14 and old AP 178 F9, for visual, the Mach 1 will be just fine with either scope.  Just don't mount both scopes together 😱

Jeff

On Sat, Jun 5, 2021 at 9:22 AM Mike Shade via groups.io <mshade=q.com@groups.io> wrote:

Thoughts about a C14 Edge on a Mach-1 for just visual poking around, NO imaging?  Same for a 160EDF, for just visual puttering?

 

Thanks

 

Mike J. Shade

Mike J. Shade Photography:

mshadephotography.com

 

In War: Resolution

In Defeat: Defiance

In Victory: Magnanimity

In Peace: Goodwill

Sir Winston Churchill

Already, in the gathering dusk, a few of the stars are turning on their lights.

Vega, the brightest one, is now dropping towards the west.  Can it be half

a year since I watched her April rising in the east?  Low in the southwest

Antares blinks a sad farwell to fall...

Leslie Peltier, Starlight Nights

 

International Dark Sky Association: www.darksky.org

 


Mach-1 capacity

Mike Shade
 

Thoughts about a C14 Edge on a Mach-1 for just visual poking around, NO imaging?  Same for a 160EDF, for just visual puttering?

 

Thanks

 

Mike J. Shade

Mike J. Shade Photography:

mshadephotography.com

 

In War: Resolution

In Defeat: Defiance

In Victory: Magnanimity

In Peace: Goodwill

Sir Winston Churchill

Already, in the gathering dusk, a few of the stars are turning on their lights.

Vega, the brightest one, is now dropping towards the west.  Can it be half

a year since I watched her April rising in the east?  Low in the southwest

Antares blinks a sad farwell to fall...

Leslie Peltier, Starlight Nights

 

International Dark Sky Association: www.darksky.org

 


Re: Will the Mach 2 support .....

Ted Mickle
 

Many thanks! - just the comprehensive answer I’m looking for.

Ted





On Jun 4, 2021, at 18:37, John Jennings <johnrogerjennings@...> wrote:



[Edited Message Follows]

Mike, Ted

If  you have not already, I would start reading Dr. Robin Glover's (SharpCap author) post in the SharpCap forums to get a basic idea about CCD vs CMOS. It's a little tedious but helpful.  SharpCap has a  built-in exposure calculator, but I have not used it since I still image with MaximDL for extended objects and galaxies.

https://forums.sharpcap.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=35&t=456

Understand that sub lengths really depend on your Sky Background Noise. There's no way to be specific without knowing that. Sky Noise is dependent on your sky brightness, camera pixel size & QE, filters and f ratio of your optics. But it's the same issue in dark vs the city skies.


I first use Dr. Glovers online Sky Background Noise calculator.

http://tools.sharpcap.co.uk/

I then use a spread sheet I made up that uses the basic calculation for all kinds of sky conditions and telescope/camera combos. The spread sheet is based on:

Sub Length= K(Read Noise Camera*2)/Sky Noise

Where K = Is a constant based on  the percent of noise acceptable in a stack of images  vs a single sub of total integration time.  As a shortcut I use K of 5% and it's 9.76. What you learn quickly is how sensitive low read noise cameras are to Sky Noise.  I use 1.5e Read Noise for my QHY268C & QHY410C because that's where I set the mode/gain/offset at.  The QHY600C is nearly the same as the QHY268C. The 600C is just a full frame version. The Read Noise can go as low as 1.1e for the 410C and the absolute QE can be over 80%.  Compare that to 9-10e for CCD sensors. Plug a few numbers in.

Also helpful is this link:


https://snrcalc.vercel.app/

I try to moderate the calculations with common sense because they can show some ridiculously short exposures.  


If  I'm doing a star field with any OSC CMOS camera and a good sky pollution filter, I never go over 30 seconds in my sky conditions.  I've gone up to 4 minutes on subs with the same broadband filter targeting extended objects, (no gradients)  but have not been satisfied because of the low contrast. In fact, I rarely image extended objects in the city with broadband filters because of my Bortle 8 skies.  They simply wash out.


I have been testing broadband filters (IDAS P3 and equivalents) on Galaxies with some initial success at about 2 minute subs because they are typically bright. Not sure where this leads.


With the OSC narrowband filters like LExtremePro, Radian and IDAS NBX you can treat sub lengths like narrowband even in the city.  I've exposed  8-10 minutes with decent results and contrast like the IC443 image I posted.


Please take my experiences and comments with a grain of salt. This is a pretty complex subject probably beyond my pay grade and I'm learning and testing all the time.


Re: Will the Mach 2 support .....

Roland Christen
 

No. You will need a Rainbow RST-135.

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: dvjbaja <jpgleasonid@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Jun 4, 2021 6:44 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Will the Mach 2 support .....

In context, I'm wondering if a Mach 2 will carry a Planewave 17"? LOL

On Fri, Jun 4, 2021 at 4:37 PM John Jennings <johnrogerjennings@...> wrote:
[Edited Message Follows]
Mike, Ted

If  you have not already, I would start reading Dr. Robin Glover's (SharpCap author) post in the SharpCap forums to get a basic idea about CCD vs CMOS. It's a little tedious but helpful.  SharpCap has a  built-in exposure calculator, but I have not used it since I still image with MaximDL for extended objects and galaxies.

https://forums.sharpcap.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=35&t=456

Understand that sub lengths really depend on your Sky Background Noise. There's no way to be specific without knowing that. Sky Noise is dependent on your sky brightness, camera pixel size & QE, filters and f ratio of your optics. But it's the same issue in dark vs the city skies.

I first use Dr. Glovers online Sky Background Noise calculator.

I then use a spread sheet I made up that uses the basic calculation for all kinds of sky conditions and telescope/camera combos. The spread sheet is based on:

Sub Length= K(Read Noise Camera*2)/Sky Noise

Where K = Is a constant based on  the percent of noise acceptable in a stack of images  vs a single sub of total integration time.  As a shortcut I use K of 5% and it's 9.76. What you learn quickly is how sensitive low read noise cameras are to Sky Noise.  I use 1.5e Read Noise for my QHY268C & QHY410C because that's where I set the mode/gain/offset at.  The QHY600C is nearly the same as the QHY268C. The 600C is just a full frame version. The Read Noise can go as low as 1.1e for the 410C and the absolute QE can be over 80%.  Compare that to 9-10e for CCD sensors. Plug a few numbers in.

Also helpful is this link:
I try to moderate the calculations with common sense because they can show some ridiculously short exposures.  

If  I'm doing a star field with any OSC CMOS camera and a good sky pollution filter, I never go over 30 seconds in my sky conditions.  I've gone up to 4 minutes on subs with the same broadband filter targeting extended objects, (no gradients)  but have not been satisfied because of the low contrast. In fact, I rarely image extended objects in the city with broadband filters because of my Bortle 8 skies.  They simply wash out.

I have been testing broadband filters (IDAS P3 and equivalents) on Galaxies with some initial success at about 2 minute subs because they are typically bright. Not sure where this leads.

With the OSC narrowband filters like LExtremePro, Radian and IDAS NBX you can treat sub lengths like narrowband even in the city.  I've exposed  8-10 minutes with decent results and contrast like the IC443 image I posted.

Please take my experiences and comments with a grain of salt. This is a pretty complex subject probably beyond my pay grade and I'm learning and testing all the time.

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: Will the Mach 2 support .....

dvjbaja
 

In context, I'm wondering if a Mach 2 will carry a Planewave 17"? LOL


On Fri, Jun 4, 2021 at 4:37 PM John Jennings <johnrogerjennings@...> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Mike, Ted

If  you have not already, I would start reading Dr. Robin Glover's (SharpCap author) post in the SharpCap forums to get a basic idea about CCD vs CMOS. It's a little tedious but helpful.  SharpCap has a  built-in exposure calculator, but I have not used it since I still image with MaximDL for extended objects and galaxies.

https://forums.sharpcap.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=35&t=456

Understand that sub lengths really depend on your Sky Background Noise. There's no way to be specific without knowing that. Sky Noise is dependent on your sky brightness, camera pixel size & QE, filters and f ratio of your optics. But it's the same issue in dark vs the city skies.


I first use Dr. Glovers online Sky Background Noise calculator.

http://tools.sharpcap.co.uk/

I then use a spread sheet I made up that uses the basic calculation for all kinds of sky conditions and telescope/camera combos. The spread sheet is based on:

Sub Length= K(Read Noise Camera*2)/Sky Noise

Where K = Is a constant based on  the percent of noise acceptable in a stack of images  vs a single sub of total integration time.  As a shortcut I use K of 5% and it's 9.76. What you learn quickly is how sensitive low read noise cameras are to Sky Noise.  I use 1.5e Read Noise for my QHY268C & QHY410C because that's where I set the mode/gain/offset at.  The QHY600C is nearly the same as the QHY268C. The 600C is just a full frame version. The Read Noise can go as low as 1.1e for the 410C and the absolute QE can be over 80%.  Compare that to 9-10e for CCD sensors. Plug a few numbers in.

Also helpful is this link:


https://snrcalc.vercel.app/

I try to moderate the calculations with common sense because they can show some ridiculously short exposures.  


If  I'm doing a star field with any OSC CMOS camera and a good sky pollution filter, I never go over 30 seconds in my sky conditions.  I've gone up to 4 minutes on subs with the same broadband filter targeting extended objects, (no gradients)  but have not been satisfied because of the low contrast. In fact, I rarely image extended objects in the city with broadband filters because of my Bortle 8 skies.  They simply wash out.


I have been testing broadband filters (IDAS P3 and equivalents) on Galaxies with some initial success at about 2 minute subs because they are typically bright. Not sure where this leads.


With the OSC narrowband filters like LExtremePro, Radian and IDAS NBX you can treat sub lengths like narrowband even in the city.  I've exposed  8-10 minutes with decent results and contrast like the IC443 image I posted.


Please take my experiences and comments with a grain of salt. This is a pretty complex subject probably beyond my pay grade and I'm learning and testing all the time.


Re: Will the Mach 2 support .....

John Jennings
 
Edited

Mike, Ted

If  you have not already, I would start reading Dr. Robin Glover's (SharpCap author) post in the SharpCap forums to get a basic idea about CCD vs CMOS. It's a little tedious but helpful.  SharpCap has a  built-in exposure calculator, but I have not used it since I still image with MaximDL for extended objects and galaxies.

https://forums.sharpcap.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=35&t=456

Understand that sub lengths really depend on your Sky Background Noise. There's no way to be specific without knowing that. Sky Noise is dependent on your sky brightness, camera pixel size & QE, filters and f ratio of your optics. But it's the same issue in dark vs the city skies.


I first use Dr. Glovers online Sky Background Noise calculator.

http://tools.sharpcap.co.uk/

I then use a spread sheet I made up that uses the basic calculation for all kinds of sky conditions and telescope/camera combos. The spread sheet is based on:

Sub Length= K(Read Noise Camera*2)/Sky Noise

Where K = Is a constant based on  the percent of noise acceptable in a stack of images  vs a single sub of total integration time.  As a shortcut I use K of 5% and it's 9.76. What you learn quickly is how sensitive low read noise cameras are to Sky Noise.  I use 1.5e Read Noise for my QHY268C & QHY410C because that's where I set the mode/gain/offset at.  The QHY600C is nearly the same as the QHY268C. The 600C is just a full frame version. The Read Noise can go as low as 1.1e for the 410C and the absolute QE can be over 80%.  Compare that to 9-10e for CCD sensors. Plug a few numbers in.

Also helpful is this link:


https://snrcalc.vercel.app/

I try to moderate the calculations with common sense because they can show some ridiculously short exposures.  


If  I'm doing a star field with any OSC CMOS camera and a good sky pollution filter, I never go over 30 seconds in my sky conditions.  I've gone up to 4 minutes on subs with the same broadband filter targeting extended objects, (no gradients)  but have not been satisfied because of the low contrast. In fact, I rarely image extended objects in the city with broadband filters because of my Bortle 8 skies.  They simply wash out.


I have been testing broadband filters (IDAS P3 and equivalents) on Galaxies with some initial success at about 2 minute subs because they are typically bright. Not sure where this leads.


With the OSC narrowband filters like LExtremePro, Radian and IDAS NBX you can treat sub lengths like narrowband even in the city.  I've exposed  8-10 minutes with decent results and contrast like the IC443 image I posted.


Please take my experiences and comments with a grain of salt. This is a pretty complex subject probably beyond my pay grade and I'm learning and testing all the time.


Re: Will the Mach 2 support .....

Ted Mickle
 

In the context of this discussion, what would be a recommended way to calculate optimal exposure times for CMOS cameras like the QHY 600M, both for wide and narrowband?

Ted



On Jun 4, 2021, at 10:11, John Jennings <johnrogerjennings@...> wrote:



My perspective on color CMOS cameras is they have their own Genre like Spaghetti Westerns. (Good, Bad and Ugly fan) Trying to replicate narrow band images like a mono sensor with filters is problematic at best. As far a color saturation is concerned with broad band RGB images, I'm not sure about that. I do know that imaging with them took a rethink of my normal CCD imaging techniques. They gather data so fast, it's easy to start decreasing your signal to noise by exposing subs too long. In that case, long sub times may actually kill the image in brighter skies. And of course, there is the band passes of the Bayer Matrix filters to consider vs individual traditional RGB filters for mono camera.

You need to break up your integration time into a larger number of subs of shorter duration if you are broadband imaging. With narrow band OSC filters like the LeXtreme Pro (7nm band pass on Ha, OIII)  it doesn't matter very much.  Of course you need long integration times, but at the proper sub time. This of course is problematic with smaller pixel Cameras because the files are so large. But computers and SSD drivers are cheap, and new sensors like the IMX410 with 5.94U pixels give me hope that larger pixel CMOS sensors may eventually appear because they are optimum for commercial low light camera applications too. 

Just remember that short CMOS subs have the same information that a longer CCD subs have normally if all other variables are the same. I've been using a portable SQM meter with separate Red, Green, and Blue filters over the lens (simulating what the OSC sees) while stacking various OSC filters over them to take sky SQM readings. I then use that to determine optimal sub exposure time limits for my CMOS OSC. Of course there is a lot of wiggle room there too.  It's almost impossible for me to image with CMOS color cameras in Bortle 8 without some kind of light pollution filter. Sky fog can be an issue after 5 seconds easily causing washed out images. It's really amazing how much light pollution filters reduce the SQM readings of the bright city sky with great transmission. With my sky MPSAS of 17.87 (Bortle 8.1),  the sensor under the red filter of the OSC matrix and an IDAS D2 filter sees 20.52 MPSAS or Bortle 4.10.   Of course they filter out good colors too.


Re: AP3600 GTOCP 4

Roland Christen
 

We have not released any newer versions of the keypad for the CP4 controller yet.

Roland



-----Original Message-----
From: Konstantin von Poschinger <KPoschinger@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Jun 4, 2021 9:33 am
Subject: [ap-gto] AP3600 GTOCP 4

Hi Roland,

can you please tell me wich Firmware and software for the HP is the actual  in the moment. I would like to use the new HP version with the modeling. But as I think it is still not ready.

Grüsse

Konstantin


Konstantin v. Poschinger


Hammerichstr. 5
22605 Hamburg
040/8805747
0171/1983476






--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: AP3600 GTOCP 4

Roland Christen
 

The guys are working on it. I will check for you.

Roland


-----Original Message-----
From: Konstantin von Poschinger <KPoschinger@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Jun 4, 2021 9:33 am
Subject: [ap-gto] AP3600 GTOCP 4

Hi Roland,

can you please tell me wich Firmware and software for the HP is the actual  in the moment. I would like to use the new HP version with the modeling. But as I think it is still not ready.

Grüsse

Konstantin


Konstantin v. Poschinger


Hammerichstr. 5
22605 Hamburg
040/8805747
0171/1983476






--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: Will the Mach 2 support .....

Mike Dodd
 

On 6/4/2021 11:11 AM, John Jennings wrote:
You need to break up your integration time into a larger number of subs
of shorter duration if you are broadband imaging.
Does this apply to dark skies or only to bright skies? I remember you said you spent considerable time on the math, but I'm unclear on your conclusions.

I typically do 10-minute subs with my OSC camera, but now I'm wondering if I should reduce that. But then I wonder why. The background level is about the same with both exposures, and it seems to me that 2X the signal ought to improve the SNR.

I am very curious about this aspect of OSC imaging.

--- Mike


Re: Will the Mach 2 support .....

John Jennings
 
Edited

My perspective on color CMOS cameras is they have their own Genre like Spaghetti Westerns. (Good, Bad and Ugly fan) Trying to replicate narrow band images like a mono sensor with filters is problematic at best. As far a color saturation is concerned with broad band RGB images, I'm not sure about that. I do know that imaging with them took a rethink of my normal CCD imaging techniques. They gather data so fast, it's easy to start decreasing your signal to noise by exposing subs too long. In that case, long sub times may actually kill the image in brighter skies. And of course, there is the band passes of the Bayer Matrix filters to consider vs individual traditional RGB filters for mono camera.

You need to break up your integration time into a larger number of subs of shorter duration if you are broadband imaging. With narrow band OSC filters like the LeXtreme Pro (7nm band pass on Ha, OIII)  it doesn't matter very much.  Of course you need long integration times, but at the proper sub time. This of course is problematic with smaller pixel Cameras because the files are so large. But computers and SSD drivers are cheap, and new sensors like the IMX410 with 5.94U pixels give me hope that larger pixel CMOS sensors may eventually appear because they are optimum for commercial low light camera applications too. 

I've been using a portable SQM meter with separate Red, Green, and Blue filters over the lens (simulating what the OSC sees) while stacking various OSC filters over them to take sky SQM readings. I then use that to determine optimal sub exposure time limits for my CMOS OSC. Of course there is a lot of wiggle room there too.  It's almost impossible for me to image with CMOS color cameras in Bortle 8 without some kind of light pollution filter. Sky fog can be an issue after 5 seconds easily causing washed out images. It's really amazing how much light pollution filters reduce the SQM readings of the bright city sky with great transmission. With my sky MPSAS of 17.87 (Bortle 8.1),  the sensor under the red filter of the OSC matrix and an IDAS D2 filter sees 20.52 MPSAS or Bortle 4.10.   Of course they filter out good colors too.


AP3600 GTOCP 4

Konstantin von Poschinger
 

Hi Roland,

can you please tell me wich Firmware and software for the HP is the actual in the moment. I would like to use the new HP version with the modeling. But as I think it is still not ready.

Grüsse

Konstantin


Konstantin v. Poschinger


Hammerichstr. 5
22605 Hamburg
040/8805747
0171/1983476


Re: Will the Mach 2 support .....

Don Anderson
 

Very nice image John.

Don Anderson


On Thursday, June 3, 2021, 04:50:22 p.m. MDT, John Jennings <johnrogerjennings@...> wrote:


[Edited Message Follows]

The following is my post to our clubs Facebook page. (Texas Astronomical Society of Dallas) An example of fairly fast image acquisition with a OSC CMOS camera. I'm trying to get efficient with my time as I'm getting older. 
 
IC443  the Jellyfish Nebula 
1/15/2021 - Nebula stack -  LeXtreme Pro
1/18/2021 - Stars stack - IDAS P3
From my backyard in Allen, Texas:
MPSAS 17.8-18.2 / Bortle 8-8.2 (Measured with SQM meter)
 
Finally got the results of my science project I've been working on for the last 3 months. Did not spend more than 2 hours on the work flow today... not including stack time. This is not an attempt at narrowband with shrunk or no stars, but rather a composite RGB image from a OSC camera with colorful background stars. Did spend a month or so on refreshing my math for sky background vs sub length calculations and doing a boatload of testing with filters and my SQM meter.  
 
63 subs @ 240secs (4.2hrs)  LeXtreme Pro
156 subs @ 30 secs (1.3hrs) IDAS P3
Total integration for my Bortle 8+ sky was 5.5 hours. 
 
Can probably cut the broadband down to about 35 mins of 30sec subs for a total integration of 4.8 hours. Anything more doesn't improve the image for me. This will allow me to shoot more than 1 nebula per night sometimes depending on their brightness, but IC443 is fairly dim.
 
QHY268C @ Bin1- 1.26 "/pix, 3.76u pixels,  AP130 @ f 4.725, APMach1 unguided.


https://ap-gto.groups.io/g/main/photo/264814/3238572?p=Created,,,20,2,0,0


Re: Will the Mach 2 support .....

Don Anderson
 

I agree. Thanks for the perspective on the two technologies. I have been holding off on getting another larger format camera waiting to see how CMOS develops.

Don Anderson


On Thursday, June 3, 2021, 03:19:38 p.m. MDT, Manusfisch via groups.io <tjfischer653@...> wrote:


Great post John, thanks for the perspective.

TJF Mobile

On Jun 3, 2021, at 15:53, John Jennings <johnrogerjennings@...> wrote:



[Edited Message Follows]

It's a different world with CMOS sensors. I've been shooting CCD's for 20 years and CMOS for about 1 1/2 years. Fast computers mounted on the telescope, SSD drives, lots of disk space etc. Learning the ins and outs of CMOS gain curves and modes. It's a new world. And they have their issues including flat frame calibrations. But they are here to stay and the performance can be incredibly awesome in certain configurations for certain purposes.  In dark skies with good mounts and tracking, all this is less important.

The read noise being so low and the cameras so fast, makes them ideal for short exposure narrow band imaging in the city. I'm getting some pretty good pictures with CMOS color cameras too with broadband and pseudo narrowband OSC color filters. I have done quite a few calculations and tests of my CCD vs. CMOS cameras. In one calculation/test, a CCD sensor with 9e (typical 9-10) read noise vs. the CMOS 1.5e read noise in my magnitude 18.1 suburban skies (with a broadband light pollution filter) results in a optimal CMOS sensor exposure of 22 seconds vs. 700 seconds for the CCD before the background rears its ugly head. (same level of photons gathered)  Everything was normalized including the pixel size and scope. Really just different read noise parameters.

The 5.94u pixels on my new QHY400C OSC seem to be a pretty good match for my AP155EDF too. And I just like the simpler work flow.  And the raw file size for this full frame larger pixel sensor is a reasonable 48 MB before debayering. I don't think Sony has released a mono version of this sensor. That would be great. The IMX410 is the sensor used in the Nikon Z6.  


Re: New Chat: 1100GTO and TheSky X #chat-notice

Donald Gaines
 

Thanks Shailesh,

I appreciate the info. Thanks everyone for all the help. 

Regards,
Don


On Wednesday, June 2, 2021, Shailesh Trivedi <strivedi@...> wrote:
Go with George's recommendation.

The TSX ascom driver can be found on the bisque site, if you choose TSX. Use this link to download it  https://www.bisque.com/wp-content/x2standard/


Re: New Chat: 1100GTO and TheSky X #chat-notice

Donald Gaines
 

Hi MJB87,

Thanks for the info, I was wondering one could get the job done without a planetarium program.

Regards,
Don

On Thursday, June 3, 2021, mjb87 via groups.io <mjb87=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
Just FYI, I used TSX with my 1100 (no encoders) for years. When I added my Mach2 (with AE of course) and set up for remote imaging I quickly learned that TSX was (1) unnecessary and (2) created a potential source of problems. My routine now is to use APCC to initialize the mount, start up SGPro to slew the telescope to the desired location (preset), then do a platesolve for final positioning and camera rotation, and then start the imaging sequence.  No need for a planetarium program.


Re: Will the Mach 2 support .....

Mike Dodd
 

On 6/3/2021 9:15 PM, Roland Christen via groups.io wrote:

Here's my IC443
with 4 hours full-color and 2-1/2 hours Ha, all 10-minute subs.
<http://astronomy.mdodd.com/nebulae-03.html>

Very nice image, BUT I'm still not convinced that a color camera has a
future for me in astro-imaging. I did a 10 minute RGB with a CCD and
compared it to a 30 minute CMOS color image. I prefer the CCD image
which has deeper color saturation that I can't seem to pull out of the
color CMOS image. Next step for me will be to get a CMOS monochrome
camera, which I think will do what I need.
I agree the color saturation isn't as deep as images I made with an ST-8XM and Astrodon filters, and I'm disappointed in that. It seems difficult to get deep reds instead of them having an orange cast.

I too have been thinking of switching to an ASI-1600MM and RGB filters, just to see if they make a difference. But then I come up with a OSC image like this one: <http://astronomy.mdodd.com/nebulae-19.html> that has deep reds. The big difference is longer exposure time -- 16+ hours here.

But then this one <http://astronomy.mdodd.com/nebulae-17a.html> has 24 hours exposure, and the colors don't look as saturated as I'd like. I tried to tease-out the blue Oiii, and that seems to have hurt the red saturation. OTOH, the faint nebulosity patches seem redder than the main nebula.

I don't know what to think. :-)

--- Mike


Re: Will the Mach 2 support .....

Roland Christen
 


Here's my IC443
with 4 hours full-color and 2-1/2 hours Ha, all 10-minute subs.
<http://astronomy.mdodd.com/nebulae-03.html>
Very nice image, BUT I'm still not convinced that a color camera has a future for me in astro-imaging. I did a 10 minute RGB with a CCD and compared it to a 30 minute CMOS color image. I prefer the CCD image which has deeper color saturation that I can't seem to pull out of the color CMOS image. Next step for me will be to get a CMOS monochrome camera, which I think will do what I need.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: Mike Dodd <mike@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Thu, Jun 3, 2021 7:58 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Will the Mach 2 support .....

On 6/3/2021 8:26 PM, John Jennings wrote:
> Copy and paste the link at the end.

Thanks, I didn't recognize itat first.

I too have had good success with combining full-color and Ha subs on a
one-shot color camera, in my case, an ASI-1600MC Pro. Here's my IC443
with 4 hours full-color and 2-1/2 hours Ha, all 10-minute subs.
<http://astronomy.mdodd.com/nebulae-03.html>

CS, Mike







--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: Will the Mach 2 support .....

Mike Dodd
 

On 6/3/2021 8:26 PM, John Jennings wrote:
Copy and paste the link at the end.
Thanks, I didn't recognize itat first.

I too have had good success with combining full-color and Ha subs on a one-shot color camera, in my case, an ASI-1600MC Pro. Here's my IC443 with 4 hours full-color and 2-1/2 hours Ha, all 10-minute subs. <http://astronomy.mdodd.com/nebulae-03.html>

CS, Mike

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