Date   

Re: Ap1200 / TheSkyX jog runaway

Roland Christen
 

Jog buttons work like this: Press on the E button and the software sends a MoveEast command. As long as you hold the button down, no other command is sent and there is no traffic between the software and the mount. When you let go of the button, the software in SkyX is supposed to send a STOP command. If that command is not sent for some reason, the mount will continue to move. If you are holding the button down and you yank the USB connection to the mount, there is nothing to tell the mount to stop moving, and it will continue on its path.

If you use APCC buttons instead of SkyX, they will work in a fail-safe manner.

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: Allen Gilchrist via groups.io <gilchrist.allen@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Jan 23, 2021 3:02 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Ap1200 / TheSkyX jog runaway

This is interesting.  Apparently this issue is not new, nor is it completely resolved.  I experienced the same thing last night.  I'm using the latest TSX Imaging Edition, and tried to use a jog command to center a star on my CCD chip.  The mount ran off to the west.  Interestingly, the motion buttons in the autoguider window and the move buttons in the telescope window of TSX work just fine.  I'm in contact with Software Bisque.  

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: Ap1200 / TheSkyX jog runaway

Allen Gilchrist
 

This is interesting.  Apparently this issue is not new, nor is it completely resolved.  I experienced the same thing last night.  I'm using the latest TSX Imaging Edition, and tried to use a jog command to center a star on my CCD chip.  The mount ran off to the west.  Interestingly, the motion buttons in the autoguider window and the move buttons in the telescope window of TSX work just fine.  I'm in contact with Software Bisque.  


Re: Mach2 - Imaging in frigid night

Roland Christen
 

The King rate is not based on a model. It is a calculated custom rate that is created inside the CP4/CP5 controller and is accessed thru a simple command, similar to what you would send to get Lunar or Solar rate. Although Sidereal, Lunar and Solar rates are fixed rates, the King rate is a variable rate. The rate is calculated inside the CP controller and depends on the position in the sky. The rate is accessed via a simple command sent to the mount from the keypad and I believe from APCC (although I don't know for sure). I don't remember the command right now but can get it from our tech guys on Monday.

The equation for the King rate works for most of the sky until you come close to the horizon, at which point it is limited. Here is a primer of what the King rate does:
https://canburytech.net/DriftAlign/DriftAlign_3.html

This one allows you to compare King and Sidereal rates for any point in the sky:
http://www.bbastrodesigns.com/equatTrackingRatesCalc.html

I do want to point out that this does not compensate for polar misalignment and Dec drift. Dec drift is normally a small fraction of RA drift, and it can be mostly nulled out by proper alignment of the azimuth axis. In the case where I was shooting down low in the east to image the Rosette early on, the RA drift rate was around 30 arc sec per hour, the Dec drift was only 5. If you're going to guide, it is nice to have the RA rate close to what is actually happening in the sky so that the guider is loafing along.

If you want to do unguided, then you can do a quick model of the path that the object will follow. 5 or 6 points will do nicely. In my case I'm taking 20 minute exposures at 1200mm focal length and I wanted to see how well the system guides at 1200mm on a bitter cold night, with about 70lb of scope and equipment attached.

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Fakatselis <pashasdad@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Jan 23, 2021 2:31 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Mach2 - Imaging in frigid night

So there is no easy selection for King rate without a model?
Is this perhaps a possible opportunity to add it as an option button in APCC?

Jim


On Jan 23, 2021, at 12:10 PM, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:


Yes, that is correct.

Roland



-----Original Message-----
From: Worsel via groups.io <bryancashion@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Jan 23, 2021 10:41 am
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Mach2 - Imaging in frigid night

Roland

Jim's question prompted a related thought.  I assume there is no need even to bother with King rate, if using an APPM model with MGBox for environmental conditions to correct for refraction.  Is this correct?


TIA

Bryan

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: Best way to connect power cables in remote observatory

Woody Schlom
 

Eric,

 

I like the fact that each power line in the RIGrunner is individually fused.

 

In my mobile observatory, I use traditional marine (plastic, stainless steel and brass) screw terminals, switches and fuse blocks to move 12v around in the observatory, but then switch to RIG runners as I get near my telescope and video gear.

 

The marine stuff is quite expensive (I use Blue Seas and Marinco – different divisions of the same company), but it’s most definitely made for harsh environments.

 

Woody

 

From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of Eric Claeys
Sent: Friday, January 22, 2021 10:25 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: [ap-gto] Best way to connect power cables in remote observatory

 

Prior to finishing my remote observatory I'd been using PowerPoles and a Rigrunner to distribute 12V to my filter wheel, focuser, etc.  12 V from power supply connected to a Rigrunner via a PowerPole connector, and then PowerPole connectors on through-the-mount cables to the devices.  Pretty straightforward and I'm sure the same as many of you.

Now that I have a remote observatory and am not plugging things in and out all the time, I'm wondering if I should continue to use PowerPoles or use something like a barrier strip with cables screwed into it, or something else.  What are the pro's and con's of the various connectors in an observatory?  It's in the mountains of NM so is pretty dry, gets into the 90's in the summer and teens in the winter.

Eric


Re: Mach2 - Imaging in frigid night

Jim Fakatselis
 

So there is no easy selection for King rate without a model?
Is this perhaps a possible opportunity to add it as an option button in APCC?

Jim


On Jan 23, 2021, at 12:10 PM, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:


Yes, that is correct.

Roland



-----Original Message-----
From: Worsel via groups.io <bryancashion@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Jan 23, 2021 10:41 am
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Mach2 - Imaging in frigid night

Roland

Jim's question prompted a related thought.  I assume there is no need even to bother with King rate, if using an APPM model with MGBox for environmental conditions to correct for refraction.  Is this correct?


TIA

Bryan

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: Best way to connect power cables in remote observatory

Barry Megdal
 

I would suggest running whatever devices are sharing the same power (perhaps main and guide camera and focuser (and maybe dew heater depending if the controller you use generates noise) from a RigRunner mounted on top of the scope, and then you only need one power cable up through the scope to the RigRunner.

 

-        Barry

 

Dr. Barry Megdal

 

President

Shb Instruments, Inc.

19215 Parthenia St.  Suite A

Northridge, CA 91324

www.shbinstruments.com

(818) 773-2000  (818)773-2005 fax

bmegdal@...

 

Faculty (retired)

Dept. of Electrical Engineering

Caltech

 


Re: Flexure or tracking? (Another "cold night" from northern Indiana)

Joel Short
 

That's a good idea Ray.  I'll check collimation throughout the sky next time I'm out.
joel


On Sat, Jan 23, 2021 at 12:02 PM Ray Gralak <groups3@...> wrote:
Joel,

> However I now wonder about tilted optics. My collimation tests look good with round stars in the corners across a
> full frame sensor.

You might want to verify that collimation holds throughout the sky by taking short images in different parts of the sky and checking the images for star roundness.

-Ray Gralak
Author of PEMPro
Author of APCC (Astro-Physics Command Center): https://www.astro-physics.com/apcc-pro
Author of Astro-Physics V2 ASCOM Driver: https://www.siriusimaging.com/apdriver


Re: Flexure or tracking? (Another "cold night" from northern Indiana)

Ray Gralak
 

Joel,

However I now wonder about tilted optics. My collimation tests look good with round stars in the corners across a
full frame sensor.
You might want to verify that collimation holds throughout the sky by taking short images in different parts of the sky and checking the images for star roundness.

-Ray Gralak
Author of PEMPro
Author of APCC (Astro-Physics Command Center): https://www.astro-physics.com/apcc-pro
Author of Astro-Physics V2 ASCOM Driver: https://www.siriusimaging.com/apdriver


-----Original Message-----
From: main@ap-gto.groups.io [mailto:main@ap-gto.groups.io] On Behalf Of Joel Short
Sent: Saturday, January 23, 2021 9:48 AM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Flexure or tracking? (Another "cold night" from northern Indiana)

Ray,
I use this same focuser (Feathertouch) on another scope with the same camera setup and I don't see this same
effect so I doubt it's focuser sag.
However I now wonder about tilted optics. My collimation tests look good with round stars in the corners across a
full frame sensor. However I have noticed that the diffraction spike on very bright stars has one spike (of 4) that
is much longer than the other 3. If I remember, next time I'm out I'll save an image of this. Any idea if that
indicates a mirror tilt issue? Again, collimation tests look good.

Rolando, I might look around for a replacement low vibration fan for the camera. That's an inexpensive and easy
thing to do so it can't hurt.
joel

On Sat, Jan 23, 2021 at 11:39 AM Ray Gralak <groups3@gralak.com> wrote:


Hi Joel,

> Guiding was quite good. I saw an average RMS RA of 0.4", Dec of 0.3".
> Also, I use an OAG for guiding.

Since auto-guiding looked good, that eliminates mount tracking as the problem. You need to look
elsewhere.

My first thought was tilted/moving optics, a sagging focuser, or a non-orthogonal camera sensor. Or some
mixture of these.

-Ray Gralak
Author of PEMPro
Author of APCC (Astro-Physics Command Center): https://www.astro-physics.com/apcc-pro
Author of Astro-Physics V2 ASCOM Driver: https://www.siriusimaging.com/apdriver



Re: Flexure or tracking? (Another "cold night" from northern Indiana)

Joel Short
 

Ray, 
I use this same focuser (Feathertouch) on another scope with the same camera setup and I don't see this same effect so I doubt it's focuser sag.  
However I now wonder about tilted optics. My collimation tests look good with round stars in the corners across a full frame sensor.  However I have noticed that the diffraction spike on very bright stars has one spike (of 4) that is much longer than the other 3.  If I remember, next time I'm out I'll save an image of this.  Any idea if that indicates a mirror tilt issue?  Again, collimation tests look good.  

Rolando, I might look around for a replacement low vibration fan for the camera.  That's an inexpensive and easy thing to do so it can't hurt.
joel


On Sat, Jan 23, 2021 at 11:39 AM Ray Gralak <groups3@...> wrote:
Hi Joel,

> Guiding was quite good.  I saw an average RMS RA of 0.4", Dec of 0.3". 
> Also, I use an OAG for guiding.

Since auto-guiding looked good, that eliminates mount tracking as the problem. You need to look elsewhere.

My first thought was tilted/moving optics, a sagging focuser, or a non-orthogonal camera sensor. Or some mixture of these.

-Ray Gralak
Author of PEMPro
Author of APCC (Astro-Physics Command Center): https://www.astro-physics.com/apcc-pro
Author of Astro-Physics V2 ASCOM Driver: https://www.siriusimaging.com/apdriver


Re: Flexure or tracking? (Another "cold night" from northern Indiana)

Ray Gralak
 

Hi Joel,

Guiding was quite good. I saw an average RMS RA of 0.4", Dec of 0.3".
Also, I use an OAG for guiding.
Since auto-guiding looked good, that eliminates mount tracking as the problem. You need to look elsewhere.

My first thought was tilted/moving optics, a sagging focuser, or a non-orthogonal camera sensor. Or some mixture of these.

-Ray Gralak
Author of PEMPro
Author of APCC (Astro-Physics Command Center): https://www.astro-physics.com/apcc-pro
Author of Astro-Physics V2 ASCOM Driver: https://www.siriusimaging.com/apdriver


-----Original Message-----
From: main@ap-gto.groups.io [mailto:main@ap-gto.groups.io] On Behalf Of Joel Short
Sent: Saturday, January 23, 2021 9:27 AM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Flexure or tracking? (Another "cold night" from northern Indiana)

Well, I'm guilty as charged...I do obsess over round stars LOL.
This doesn't look like pinching optics to me. I tried to do some experiments with the scope fans on and off, and I
didn't see a difference. I had the camera temperature set to -10C and the cooler/fan was hardly ever on. But I
have read other reports of the fan on this camera causing something like this. It's just hard to imagine a tiny,
quiet fan affecting a 45lb scope. I suspect thermal issues here, but I'm not sure what to do about it, if anything.

Your comment about the LUM stars being slightly oval because of atmospheric refraction is an interesting one.
The object was above 45deg most of the night. Would narrowband filters show this same effect? About every
4th image gave me nearly perfect round stars, but I can't correlate anything with those images.

I appreciate your thoughts Roland.
joel

On Sat, Jan 23, 2021 at 11:04 AM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:


Sometimes the scope itself has problems in the cold. Things like pinched optics caused by metal cells
contracting and pressing on the optics. You can also have heat plumes from the cameras and electronics that
cause elongation of stars from the thermals inside focuser tubes. Last night, because of the intense cold, my
camera fan vibrated the entire telescope tube to the point that it filled the observatory with a loud buzz. The tube
acted like a drum skin and I could actually feel the vibration on the tube. I could see the effect on the star images
when i turned the fan on and off.



One other thing i noticed is when imaging in Luminance below 45 degrees, the stars will be slightly oval
simply because atmospheric refraction actually stretches the stars out into a short spectrum. I first noticed that
with my 10"F14 Mak-Cass, but I can also see it when using the 160EDF refractor. The individual RGB images will
be perfectly round, but the Luminance will be slightly oval. The effect was especially so last night because of the
cold air and high pressure which increases the refractive effect of the atmosphere.



Finally, I feel that people make far too much out of stars being round or not, and lose sight of the beauty of
the images that they can capture. On Cloudy Nights it seems that people obsess about round stars and how long
they can image unguided, without realizing that nature throws lots of boulders in their way to the mountain top.


Rolando






Re: Flexure or tracking? (Another "cold night" from northern Indiana)

Roland Christen
 

At our Chile observatory we had to remove the fans from the FLI camera and replace them with low vibration fans. The original fans caused 2:1 oblong stars, which totally freaked me out at first until I realized the cause. The scope itself is very robust, but that's not what was moving around. The imaging train after the focuser included a large and heavy 10 position filter wheel, an off-axis guider and the camera itself. All of that equipment was vibrating, the scope itself was not.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: Joel Short <buckeyestargazer@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Jan 23, 2021 11:26 am
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Flexure or tracking? (Another "cold night" from northern Indiana)

Well, I'm guilty as charged...I do obsess over round stars LOL.
This doesn't look like pinching optics to me.  I tried to do some experiments with the scope fans on and off, and I didn't see a difference.  I had the camera temperature set to -10C and the cooler/fan was hardly ever on. But I have read other reports of the fan on this camera causing something like this.  It's just hard to imagine a tiny, quiet fan affecting a 45lb scope. I suspect thermal issues here, but I'm not sure what to do about it, if anything. 

Your comment about the LUM stars being slightly oval because of atmospheric refraction is an interesting one.  The object was above 45deg most of the night.  Would narrowband filters show this same effect?  About every 4th image gave me nearly perfect round stars, but I can't correlate anything with those images.  

I appreciate your thoughts Roland.
joel

On Sat, Jan 23, 2021 at 11:04 AM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Sometimes the scope itself has problems in the cold. Things like pinched optics caused by metal cells contracting and pressing on the optics. You can also have heat plumes from the cameras and electronics that cause elongation of stars from the thermals inside focuser tubes. Last night, because of the intense cold, my camera fan vibrated the entire telescope tube to the point that it filled the observatory with a loud buzz. The tube acted like a drum skin and I could actually feel the vibration on the tube. I could see the effect on the star images when i turned the fan on and off.

One other thing i noticed is when imaging in Luminance below 45 degrees, the stars will be slightly oval simply because atmospheric refraction actually stretches the stars out into a short spectrum. I first noticed that with my 10"F14 Mak-Cass, but I can also see it when using the 160EDF refractor. The individual RGB images will be perfectly round, but the Luminance will be slightly oval. The effect was especially so last night because of the cold air and high pressure which increases the refractive effect of the atmosphere.

Finally, I feel that people make far too much out of stars being round or not, and lose sight of the beauty of the images that they can capture. On Cloudy Nights it seems that people obsess about round stars and how long they can image unguided, without realizing that nature throws lots of boulders in their way to the mountain top.

Rolando

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: Flexure or tracking? (Another "cold night" from northern Indiana)

Joel Short
 

Well, I'm guilty as charged...I do obsess over round stars LOL.
This doesn't look like pinching optics to me.  I tried to do some experiments with the scope fans on and off, and I didn't see a difference.  I had the camera temperature set to -10C and the cooler/fan was hardly ever on. But I have read other reports of the fan on this camera causing something like this.  It's just hard to imagine a tiny, quiet fan affecting a 45lb scope. I suspect thermal issues here, but I'm not sure what to do about it, if anything. 

Your comment about the LUM stars being slightly oval because of atmospheric refraction is an interesting one.  The object was above 45deg most of the night.  Would narrowband filters show this same effect?  About every 4th image gave me nearly perfect round stars, but I can't correlate anything with those images.  

I appreciate your thoughts Roland.
joel


On Sat, Jan 23, 2021 at 11:04 AM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Sometimes the scope itself has problems in the cold. Things like pinched optics caused by metal cells contracting and pressing on the optics. You can also have heat plumes from the cameras and electronics that cause elongation of stars from the thermals inside focuser tubes. Last night, because of the intense cold, my camera fan vibrated the entire telescope tube to the point that it filled the observatory with a loud buzz. The tube acted like a drum skin and I could actually feel the vibration on the tube. I could see the effect on the star images when i turned the fan on and off.

One other thing i noticed is when imaging in Luminance below 45 degrees, the stars will be slightly oval simply because atmospheric refraction actually stretches the stars out into a short spectrum. I first noticed that with my 10"F14 Mak-Cass, but I can also see it when using the 160EDF refractor. The individual RGB images will be perfectly round, but the Luminance will be slightly oval. The effect was especially so last night because of the cold air and high pressure which increases the refractive effect of the atmosphere.

Finally, I feel that people make far too much out of stars being round or not, and lose sight of the beauty of the images that they can capture. On Cloudy Nights it seems that people obsess about round stars and how long they can image unguided, without realizing that nature throws lots of boulders in their way to the mountain top.

Rolando


Re: Mach2 - Imaging in frigid night

Roland Christen
 

Yes, that is correct.

Roland



-----Original Message-----
From: Worsel via groups.io <bryancashion@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Jan 23, 2021 10:41 am
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Mach2 - Imaging in frigid night

Roland

Jim's question prompted a related thought.  I assume there is no need even to bother with King rate, if using an APPM model with MGBox for environmental conditions to correct for refraction.  Is this correct?


TIA

Bryan

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: Flexure or tracking? (Another "cold night" from northern Indiana)

Roland Christen
 

Sometimes the scope itself has problems in the cold. Things like pinched optics caused by metal cells contracting and pressing on the optics. You can also have heat plumes from the cameras and electronics that cause elongation of stars from the thermals inside focuser tubes. Last night, because of the intense cold, my camera fan vibrated the entire telescope tube to the point that it filled the observatory with a loud buzz. The tube acted like a drum skin and I could actually feel the vibration on the tube. I could see the effect on the star images when i turned the fan on and off.

One other thing i noticed is when imaging in Luminance below 45 degrees, the stars will be slightly oval simply because atmospheric refraction actually stretches the stars out into a short spectrum. I first noticed that with my 10"F14 Mak-Cass, but I can also see it when using the 160EDF refractor. The individual RGB images will be perfectly round, but the Luminance will be slightly oval. The effect was especially so last night because of the cold air and high pressure which increases the refractive effect of the atmosphere.

Finally, I feel that people make far too much out of stars being round or not, and lose sight of the beauty of the images that they can capture. On Cloudy Nights it seems that people obsess about round stars and how long they can image unguided, without realizing that nature throws lots of boulders in their way to the mountain top.

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: Joel Short <buckeyestargazer@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Jan 23, 2021 10:29 am
Subject: [ap-gto] Flexure or tracking? (Another "cold night" from northern Indiana)

Like Roland experienced, last night was a very cold night in northern Indiana but the first clear night in a while.  Thankfully I operate everything remotely from the comfort of my living room.  

I have a new to me AGO 12.5" iDK riding on my AP1100GTO, and last night was the first true imaging test - 10min narrowband images of NGC2371 (ASI6200MM).  I noticed that more often than not the stars were slightly elongated in the same direction all across the image.  Interestingly, after the meridian flip, the elongation looked like is was rotated 90deg.  Prior to the flip the stars pointed toward the upper right corner; after the flip the stars pointed to the upper left corner.  I checked polar alignment and it is good.  Guiding was quite good.  I saw an average RMS RA of 0.4", Dec of 0.3".  Also, I use an OAG for guiding.

To me the star elongation, then rotated after the meridian flip, would indicate some kind of flexure issue.  Does that sound right?
I'm not sure where any flexure would come from since I'm using an OAG.  Any thoughts?
joel

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: Mach2 - Imaging in frigid night

Worsel
 

Roland

Jim's question prompted a related thought.  I assume there is no need even to bother with King rate, if using an APPM model with MGBox for environmental conditions to correct for refraction.  Is this correct?


TIA

Bryan


Flexure or tracking? (Another "cold night" from northern Indiana)

Joel Short
 

Like Roland experienced, last night was a very cold night in northern Indiana but the first clear night in a while.  Thankfully I operate everything remotely from the comfort of my living room.  

I have a new to me AGO 12.5" iDK riding on my AP1100GTO, and last night was the first true imaging test - 10min narrowband images of NGC2371 (ASI6200MM).  I noticed that more often than not the stars were slightly elongated in the same direction all across the image.  Interestingly, after the meridian flip, the elongation looked like is was rotated 90deg.  Prior to the flip the stars pointed toward the upper right corner; after the flip the stars pointed to the upper left corner.  I checked polar alignment and it is good.  Guiding was quite good.  I saw an average RMS RA of 0.4", Dec of 0.3".  Also, I use an OAG for guiding.

To me the star elongation, then rotated after the meridian flip, would indicate some kind of flexure issue.  Does that sound right?
I'm not sure where any flexure would come from since I'm using an OAG.  Any thoughts?
joel


Re: [ap-ug] Mach2 - Imaging in frigid night

thefamily90 Phillips
 

Yikes!! Sounds like my idea of fun! Hope you are dressed appropriately.

Best,

Jim


From: main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io> on behalf of Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...>
Sent: Friday, January 22, 2021 8:42:08 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>; main@ap-ug.groups.io <main@ap-ug.groups.io>
Subject: [ap-ug] Mach2 - Imaging in frigid night
 
Hi Astronuts,

First clear night in a month, fired up the 160 EDF on the Mach2 mount at the AP observatory. There's also a 155 EDF riding piggyback, but not being used tonight. It's 5 deg F (-15C) right now with very clear air. The temperature is dropping like an anvil off a cliff. Seeing is, well see below (poor - 2 out of 5). The mount is tracking with MaximDL, multi-star tracking mode and averaging 0.15 rms arc sec. This is the first time in a year that I've operated this mount in such cold conditions. My fingers are freezing after only 5 minutes of operating out there. But for clear skies, it's worth it.

Shooting the Rosette in Ha with the Moon straight up.

Rolando


Current forecast for Astro-Physics Clear Sky Chart


Re: Best way to connect power cables in remote observatory

Mike Dodd
 

On 1/23/2021 1:25 AM, Eric Claeys wrote:
Now that I have a remote observatory and am not plugging things in and
out all the time, I'm wondering if I should continue to use PowerPoles
or use something like a barrier strip with cables screwed into it, or
something else.
I use Power Poles to connect power to my AP1200, and they've performed perfectly for more than a year in hot and cold, with humidity up to 90%.

I run power cables for cameras, focuser, rotator, anti-dew heaters, and the Arduino lens cap opener directly from the power supplies to the scope. If necessary, I extend the cables with inline soldered splices (insulated with shrink tubing). I prefer to minimize the number of connections between the power supply and the equipment.

--- Mike
http://astronomy.mdodd.com


Best way to connect power cables in remote observatory

Eric Claeys
 

Prior to finishing my remote observatory I'd been using PowerPoles and a Rigrunner to distribute 12V to my filter wheel, focuser, etc.  12 V from power supply connected to a Rigrunner via a PowerPole connector, and then PowerPole connectors on through-the-mount cables to the devices.  Pretty straightforward and I'm sure the same as many of you.

Now that I have a remote observatory and am not plugging things in and out all the time, I'm wondering if I should continue to use PowerPoles or use something like a barrier strip with cables screwed into it, or something else.  What are the pro's and con's of the various connectors in an observatory?  It's in the mountains of NM so is pretty dry, gets into the 90's in the summer and teens in the winter.

Eric


Re: Mach2 - Imaging in frigid night

Jim Fakatselis
 

Is there a way to set Kung Rate in APCC Pro or does it have to be entered manually or only by keypad ?

On Jan 23, 2021, at 12:16 AM, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:


I've got eleven 20 minute exposures, all good keepers. Tomorrow I'll whip up a quick combine and post it on my Astrobin gallery. See what ya think.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Jan 22, 2021 11:06 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Mach2 - Imaging in frigid night

Sounds good.

I'm about to stop soon. The Rosette is now well past the meridian and the scope is imaging under the mount. Fortunately it clears the tripod by a large amount and I could run it until dawn that way, but It's time to go home, turn on the news and then go and snooze. Tomorrow is another day - lots of work waiting for me.

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: Tim Morrill via groups.io <helo4@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Jan 22, 2021 10:11 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Mach2 - Imaging in frigid night

Soul Nebula right now. And then to the Leo triplet later. 🔭 🌌 

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics

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