Date   

Remote use of Meridian delay feature

c34s43 <c34s43@...>
 

I read the manual is available a way to situate the telescope in
the "wrong" side of the 1200GTO using the Meridian Delay feature. But I
don't used yet. I want know if is possible use these feature from The
Sky 6 and if it can be used remotely witout problems. Please coment
anyone use it remotely and include the experiencies and problems like
cable dragging you found.
I am interested to it when imanging a object near meridiane don't need
to revert the tube.

Thank you,

Carlos


Re: Desperately trying (this is the correct one) ... (Happy) end...

S HEGGIE <stuart.j.heggie@...>
 

Joe, I forgot you were in Toronto (my home town!). Yes, all good points. My laptop is running off 120v AC so I don't think my HD spins down. At those temps my battery would last about 2 minutes.

Stuart

From: "Joseph Zeglinski" <J.Zeglinski@...>
Reply-To: ap-gto@...
To: <ap-gto@...>
Subject: [ap-gto] Re: Desperately trying (this is the correct one) ... (Happy) end...
Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2007 14:17:30 -0500

Hi Stuart,

Thought about that too, in my own winter conditions., in Toronto.
My plan is to tape a red filter sheet inside a large Zip-Lok bag, maybe a
large "turkey roasting" type from the grocery, and slip it (like a pillow
case) over the raised LCD screen. The bag will retain, the heat emitted from
the (really warm) fluorescent back light tubes and power supply/inverter LCD
electronics in the lid. This will keep the LCD crystalline switching material
from slowing down, possibly expanding and cracking the screen, or just turning
from pink (although that colour would be useful here).
If that works well enough, I considered using a second back slipped over the
base, allowing the keyboard to still be used through the bag, while it's heat
is similarly retained on really frigid nights.

I had originally planned on constantly raising and lowering the LCD
screen, so that it's heat would keep the dew (frost crystals) off the
keyboard, and to sandwich the base unit's heat inside, from escaping. Then I
snapped the hinges in the cold - where I learned that repeatedly flexing them
was a bad idea.

Best also to keep the hard drive spinning, rather than allowing energy
saving spin down, since my extensive battery measurements had found that the
hard drive on my Compaq Armada 7800 drains minimal power, while it's heat
would keep the insides from drowning in dew. (The bags could be left on as the
laptop acclimates again, back in the house, keeping the dew off there as
well.)

Joe

----- Original Message -----
From: "S HEGGIE" <stuart.j.heggie@...>
To: <ap-gto@...>
Sent: Thursday, December 13, 2007 1:44 PM
Subject: RE: [ap-gto] Re: Desperately trying (this is the correct one) ...
(Happy) end...



Joe, these are good points. I did investigate the tolerance of the LCD
screen to cold and was advised that the HP machine I had was probably
safe
to -20C and probably -25C (about as cold as it ever gets here). Like
you, I
leave the lid open, cover the screen with a dark red film and then, when
heading back to the house, cover the whole affair with a t-shirt to
further
block the light and to protect the rig from frost/dew. Seems to work
since I
have had it there for two years without a problem (knock on wood!).

I've been considering replacing it with an older XP desktop (my son's -
he's
due for an upgrade he says!). I'd have to add a wireless capability to
that
desktop but that isn't too much money.

Stuart

From: "Joseph Zeglinski" <J.Zeglinski@...>
Reply-To: ap-gto@...
To: <ap-gto@...>
Subject: [ap-gto] Re: Desperately trying (this is the correct one) ...
(Happy) end...
Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2007 13:14:21 -0500

Hi Stuart,

Straying a bit OT, I just wanted to comment about using an old
"portable"
laptop in the cold.

Last year I decided to run a series of cold soak test of an old IBM
laptop
in my garage, at about the freezing mark. I eventually destroyed the
laptop
because the LCD screen hinges broke away from the body. Laptop plastic
is
really meant for benign California weather conditions, and is not made
of
tough thermo plastic. The springs that hold the screen raised up, are
VERY
strong (I had them apart, eventually), and they are typically held to
the
body
by two tiny screws into a press fitted brass screw socket. There is also
an
intentional TENSION or friction brake system to prevent the LCD from
slamming
shut, and also to let you adjust the screen tilt angle - more work for
the
hinges against that brake pressure. As you open or close the LCD, the
springs
really stress these screw connections, on the two barrel tortion
springs.

If the case doesn't crack, the brass sockets will break away and
rip
free
of the plastic base, as in my case. If you have an expensive
"ruggedized"
laptop, with a case made of magnesium, then "maybe" those hinges would
be
screwed into the metal frame, allowing it to be used "normally" in
arctic
conditions in military or industrial applications. Consumer laptops are
not
really meant for operation in outdoor winter conditions, without extra
care.

My plan for laptop use is to leave the lid always open, and only to
close
the laptop LCD screen after it has been warmed up for about 10 minutes
in a
heated car, or in the house. It makes it clumsy to carry, screen raised,
but
much better than wrecking an expensive laptop in the freezing cold. Then
again, it will likely get soaking wet inside, as it warms up while it is
open - perhaps having it running as it warms up externally, might keep
the
dew
inside at bay. Remember, the spec on laptops is for use "above freezing"
-
perhaps because of this "case fragility"reason.

Joe



To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list
see http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gto
Yahoo! Groups Links





Re: New file uploaded to ap-gto

Bob Olson <r.olson@...>
 

Hi Roland,

I am heading to Kauai in mid-January. Thanks for the description as this is my first trip and I had no idea what to expect.

Bob


Re: Desperately trying (this is the correct one) ... (Happy) end...

Joe Zeglinski
 

Hi Stuart,

Thought about that too, in my own winter conditions., in Toronto.
My plan is to tape a red filter sheet inside a large Zip-Lok bag, maybe a
large "turkey roasting" type from the grocery, and slip it (like a pillow
case) over the raised LCD screen. The bag will retain, the heat emitted from
the (really warm) fluorescent back light tubes and power supply/inverter LCD
electronics in the lid. This will keep the LCD crystalline switching material
from slowing down, possibly expanding and cracking the screen, or just turning
from pink (although that colour would be useful here).
If that works well enough, I considered using a second back slipped over the
base, allowing the keyboard to still be used through the bag, while it's heat
is similarly retained on really frigid nights.

I had originally planned on constantly raising and lowering the LCD
screen, so that it's heat would keep the dew (frost crystals) off the
keyboard, and to sandwich the base unit's heat inside, from escaping. Then I
snapped the hinges in the cold - where I learned that repeatedly flexing them
was a bad idea.

Best also to keep the hard drive spinning, rather than allowing energy
saving spin down, since my extensive battery measurements had found that the
hard drive on my Compaq Armada 7800 drains minimal power, while it's heat
would keep the insides from drowning in dew. (The bags could be left on as the
laptop acclimates again, back in the house, keeping the dew off there as
well.)

Joe

----- Original Message -----
From: "S HEGGIE" <stuart.j.heggie@...>
To: <ap-gto@...>
Sent: Thursday, December 13, 2007 1:44 PM
Subject: RE: [ap-gto] Re: Desperately trying (this is the correct one) ...
(Happy) end...



Joe, these are good points. I did investigate the tolerance of the LCD
screen to cold and was advised that the HP machine I had was probably safe
to -20C and probably -25C (about as cold as it ever gets here). Like you, I
leave the lid open, cover the screen with a dark red film and then, when
heading back to the house, cover the whole affair with a t-shirt to further
block the light and to protect the rig from frost/dew. Seems to work since I
have had it there for two years without a problem (knock on wood!).

I've been considering replacing it with an older XP desktop (my son's - he's
due for an upgrade he says!). I'd have to add a wireless capability to that
desktop but that isn't too much money.

Stuart

From: "Joseph Zeglinski" <J.Zeglinski@...>
Reply-To: ap-gto@...
To: <ap-gto@...>
Subject: [ap-gto] Re: Desperately trying (this is the correct one) ...
(Happy) end...
Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2007 13:14:21 -0500

Hi Stuart,

Straying a bit OT, I just wanted to comment about using an old
"portable"
laptop in the cold.

Last year I decided to run a series of cold soak test of an old IBM
laptop
in my garage, at about the freezing mark. I eventually destroyed the laptop
because the LCD screen hinges broke away from the body. Laptop plastic is
really meant for benign California weather conditions, and is not made of
tough thermo plastic. The springs that hold the screen raised up, are VERY
strong (I had them apart, eventually), and they are typically held to the
body
by two tiny screws into a press fitted brass screw socket. There is also an
intentional TENSION or friction brake system to prevent the LCD from
slamming
shut, and also to let you adjust the screen tilt angle - more work for the
hinges against that brake pressure. As you open or close the LCD, the
springs
really stress these screw connections, on the two barrel tortion springs.

If the case doesn't crack, the brass sockets will break away and rip
free
of the plastic base, as in my case. If you have an expensive "ruggedized"
laptop, with a case made of magnesium, then "maybe" those hinges would be
screwed into the metal frame, allowing it to be used "normally" in arctic
conditions in military or industrial applications. Consumer laptops are not
really meant for operation in outdoor winter conditions, without extra
care.

My plan for laptop use is to leave the lid always open, and only to
close
the laptop LCD screen after it has been warmed up for about 10 minutes in a
heated car, or in the house. It makes it clumsy to carry, screen raised,
but
much better than wrecking an expensive laptop in the freezing cold. Then
again, it will likely get soaking wet inside, as it warms up while it is
open - perhaps having it running as it warms up externally, might keep the
dew
inside at bay. Remember, the spec on laptops is for use "above freezing" -
perhaps because of this "case fragility"reason.

Joe



To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list
see http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gto
Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: New file uploaded to ap-gto

Gregory Nottingham <gnpnotti@...>
 

Rolando,
Of course my wishes went to Marj too.
That's great that you've been there so many times. We went to
Oahu and the Big Island after Desert Storm and I stopped over a
couple of days in 1998 in Pearl Harbor. I've been on the East Coast
since.

Have fun.

Greg

On Dec 13, 2007, at 13:58, chris1011@... wrote:

In a message dated 12/13/2007 12:16:51 PM Central Standard Time,
gnpnotti@... writes:

I hope you get to see all of the Hawaiian
islands, not just Oahu!
Well, we are headed off to Maui. This is our 9th trip together. We
have seen
all the islands except for Lanai, yes we've even stayed on Molokai,
a really
great funky cool place (mo bettah fo sure, bro!).

Here's my own personal assessment:

Kaui - really nice, friendly, quiet, fantastic scenery and great
hiking,
beaches are super.
Oahu - exciting, fun fun fun, lots of bikini action and great
surfing show.
Molokai - what can I say, it is a funky cool place to spend some
time, and I
wish we had stayed more than 4 days. You wanna live Hawaiian, this
is the
place.
Maui - best beach action, lots to do and see in every corner of
this isle,
probably my favorite
Big Island - volcanos, beaucoup lava fields (some hot enough to fry
in), big
telescopes, orchid gardens all over the place, Hilo is a super town.

Rolando

**************************************
See AOL's top rated recipes
(http://food.aol.com/top-rated-recipes?NCID=aoltop00030000000004)





Re: low cost way to use a solid state disk in your laptop

S HEGGIE <stuart.j.heggie@...>
 

Richard, this is interesting. Thanks for the info. I have been pretty lucky with the laptop in the cold and only had trouble booting up twice due to cold. A quick trip inside did the trick both times. If I switch to a desktop I'll probably use a CRT as you indicated. Luckily I have room for it.

Stuart

From: Richard Crisp <rdcrisp@...>
Reply-To: ap-gto@...
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] low cost way to use a solid state disk in your laptop
Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2007 10:34:11 -0800 (PST)

here's the product for the notebook (and is bootable)

http://www.addonics.com/products/flash_memory_reader/ad44midecf.asp

for a desktop you can this:

http://www.addonics.com/products/flash_memory_reader/adeb44idecf.asp


finally if you use a desktop, then why not use a conventional CRT if the LCD causes you grief in the cold?

For that matter most laptops can be used with an external monitor such as a crt or plasma or LCD panel.



Richard Crisp <rdcrisp@...> wrote:
I haven't tried this....
I was confused earlier: I thought the adaptor took USB thumb drives, but alas they use Compact Flash. Either way they are plentiful and cheap. If you run tight on space, then only put the executables and OS on the Flash Drive and download the data wirelessely to a "warm computer".

this may give you an increase in disk drive reliability when operating in the bitter cold.


http://www.theinquirer.org/default.aspx?article=38744

Flashy alternative to hard drives emerges

Neat idea of the day

By Andrew Thomas: Thursday 05 April 2007, 13:09

A LOW COST ADAPTOR allows 2.5-inch hard drives to be swapped for Compact Flash cards. California-based Addonics has produced a range of adaptors allowing CF cards or Microdrives to be used as a direct replacement for IDE and SATA hard drives. Primarily aimed at notebooks, Addonics also has an embedded version for processor boards in industrial PCs. No special device drivers are required, says the company, making the adapters compatible with most operating systems. The range includes versions for IDE and SATA drives, the IDE variant having the option of one or two CF slots at $24.99 and $29.99 respectively. The SATA adaptor comes with a single slot at $35.99. L'INQ
More here
http://www.addonics.com/










Re: Desperately trying (this is the correct one) ... (Happy) end...

S HEGGIE <stuart.j.heggie@...>
 

Joe, these are good points. I did investigate the tolerance of the LCD screen to cold and was advised that the HP machine I had was probably safe to -20C and probably -25C (about as cold as it ever gets here). Like you, I leave the lid open, cover the screen with a dark red film and then, when heading back to the house, cover the whole affair with a t-shirt to further block the light and to protect the rig from frost/dew. Seems to work since I have had it there for two years without a problem (knock on wood!).

I've been considering replacing it with an older XP desktop (my son's - he's due for an upgrade he says!). I'd have to add a wireless capability to that desktop but that isn't too much money.

Stuart

From: "Joseph Zeglinski" <J.Zeglinski@...>
Reply-To: ap-gto@...
To: <ap-gto@...>
Subject: [ap-gto] Re: Desperately trying (this is the correct one) ... (Happy) end...
Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2007 13:14:21 -0500

Hi Stuart,

Straying a bit OT, I just wanted to comment about using an old "portable"
laptop in the cold.

Last year I decided to run a series of cold soak test of an old IBM laptop
in my garage, at about the freezing mark. I eventually destroyed the laptop
because the LCD screen hinges broke away from the body. Laptop plastic is
really meant for benign California weather conditions, and is not made of
tough thermo plastic. The springs that hold the screen raised up, are VERY
strong (I had them apart, eventually), and they are typically held to the body
by two tiny screws into a press fitted brass screw socket. There is also an
intentional TENSION or friction brake system to prevent the LCD from slamming
shut, and also to let you adjust the screen tilt angle - more work for the
hinges against that brake pressure. As you open or close the LCD, the springs
really stress these screw connections, on the two barrel tortion springs.

If the case doesn't crack, the brass sockets will break away and rip free
of the plastic base, as in my case. If you have an expensive "ruggedized"
laptop, with a case made of magnesium, then "maybe" those hinges would be
screwed into the metal frame, allowing it to be used "normally" in arctic
conditions in military or industrial applications. Consumer laptops are not
really meant for operation in outdoor winter conditions, without extra care.

My plan for laptop use is to leave the lid always open, and only to close
the laptop LCD screen after it has been warmed up for about 10 minutes in a
heated car, or in the house. It makes it clumsy to carry, screen raised, but
much better than wrecking an expensive laptop in the freezing cold. Then
again, it will likely get soaking wet inside, as it warms up while it is
open - perhaps having it running as it warms up externally, might keep the dew
inside at bay. Remember, the spec on laptops is for use "above freezing" -
perhaps because of this "case fragility"reason.

Joe


Re: New file uploaded to ap-gto

ayiomamitis
 

--- In ap-gto@..., chris1011@... wrote:

In a message dated 12/13/2007 11:45:45 AM Central Standard Time,
gnpnotti@... writes:


Rolando,
Awesome!!! Put a telescope on each of the mounts and I'll make it
my wallpaper.
I plan to do that soon - gotta finish the appropriate scope for El
Big One.

Hhmmmmm ....

But first I am heading off to Hawaii this weekend for the holidays
for some R&R
(Marj too).
Enjoy!

When I get back there will be more 140 shipping, plus I am
working on the first half of the 130F6 lenses (already polished but
not figured).
Santa will be busy this month and many folks happy for being good the
past year.

Anthony.

Rolando


**************************************
See AOL's top rated recipes
(http://food.aol.com/top-rated-recipes?NCID=aoltop00030000000004)


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: New file uploaded to ap-gto

ayiomamitis
 

--- In ap-gto@..., chris1011@... wrote:

In a message dated 12/13/2007 11:31:28 AM Central Standard Time,
ap-gto@... writes:


You can access this file at the URL:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gto/files/3600%20El%20Capitan/showroom112907-1.jpg


I just posted this picture of our showroom which now has one of each
of our
mounts. Compare the large one with the rest of our lineup.
I can't believe how "small" the AP1200GTO looks compared to the
"other" one! LOL.

Also, interesting to see all of the spare OTA's just lying around on
the ground. Need help in finding them a new home? I can make a really
good recommendation. :-)

Anthony.


Rolando


**************************************
See AOL's top rated recipes
(http://food.aol.com/top-rated-recipes?NCID=aoltop00030000000004)


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: low cost way to use a solid state disk in your laptop

Richard Crisp
 

here's the product for the notebook (and is bootable)

http://www.addonics.com/products/flash_memory_reader/ad44midecf.asp

for a desktop you can this:

http://www.addonics.com/products/flash_memory_reader/adeb44idecf.asp


finally if you use a desktop, then why not use a conventional CRT if the LCD causes you grief in the cold?

For that matter most laptops can be used with an external monitor such as a crt or plasma or LCD panel.



Richard Crisp <rdcrisp@...> wrote:
I haven't tried this....
I was confused earlier: I thought the adaptor took USB thumb drives, but alas they use Compact Flash. Either way they are plentiful and cheap. If you run tight on space, then only put the executables and OS on the Flash Drive and download the data wirelessely to a "warm computer".

this may give you an increase in disk drive reliability when operating in the bitter cold.


http://www.theinquirer.org/default.aspx?article=38744

Flashy alternative to hard drives emerges

Neat idea of the day

By Andrew Thomas: Thursday 05 April 2007, 13:09

A LOW COST ADAPTOR allows 2.5-inch hard drives to be swapped for Compact Flash cards. California-based Addonics has produced a range of adaptors allowing CF cards or Microdrives to be used as a direct replacement for IDE and SATA hard drives. Primarily aimed at notebooks, Addonics also has an embedded version for processor boards in industrial PCs. No special device drivers are required, says the company, making the adapters compatible with most operating systems. The range includes versions for IDE and SATA drives, the IDE variant having the option of one or two CF slots at $24.99 and $29.99 respectively. The SATA adaptor comes with a single slot at $35.99. µ L'INQ
More here
http://www.addonics.com/








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


low cost way to use a solid state disk in your laptop

Richard Crisp
 

I haven't tried this....
I was confused earlier: I thought the adaptor took USB thumb drives, but alas they use Compact Flash. Either way they are plentiful and cheap. If you run tight on space, then only put the executables and OS on the Flash Drive and download the data wirelessely to a "warm computer".

this may give you an increase in disk drive reliability when operating in the bitter cold.


http://www.theinquirer.org/default.aspx?article=38744

Flashy alternative to hard drives emerges

Neat idea of the day

By Andrew Thomas: Thursday 05 April 2007, 13:09

A LOW COST ADAPTOR allows 2.5-inch hard drives to be swapped for Compact Flash cards. California-based Addonics has produced a range of adaptors allowing CF cards or Microdrives to be used as a direct replacement for IDE and SATA hard drives. Primarily aimed at notebooks, Addonics also has an embedded version for processor boards in industrial PCs. No special device drivers are required, says the company, making the adapters compatible with most operating systems. The range includes versions for IDE and SATA drives, the IDE variant having the option of one or two CF slots at $24.99 and $29.99 respectively. The SATA adaptor comes with a single slot at $35.99. µ L'INQ
More here
http://www.addonics.com/





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Newbie at autoguiding, what's happening?

Ben Ritchie <count.zero@...>
 

Hi folks. I'm using an AP1200GTO, AP130EDT and SBIG ST4000XCM, and i'm
having my first go at getting autoguiding. I have the CCD aligned so
that the star correctly moves left/right and up/down when I use the
hand controller (i.e. the CCD is aligned with the axes of the mount),
and it's connected to the mount's autoguider port with the
SBIG-supplied cable.

When I click 'calibrate' in CCDSoft, the star moves to the right as
expected when the software does the "X+" movement. However, when it
issues "X-" the star moves downwards - so "X-" is at 90 degrees to
"X+", not 180. When "Y+" is issued the star moves up the screen, and
"Y-" moves the star to the left. So it's as if "X-" and "Y-" are
swapped round. The star returns right back to its start point, so it's
not that commands aren't being received, backlash, etc. I'm doing 15s
per movement, but I get exactly the same effect with 5s or 25s.

I've tried with a spare SBIG relay cable, but that gives the same
result. I suspect it's a newbie error somewhere, but I can't find any
sign of a relevant option. I don't even know if i'm missing a mount
option or CCD/software one.

Any suggestions appreciated!

Ben.


Re: New file uploaded to ap-gto

Gregory Nottingham <gnpnotti@...>
 

Rolando,
Now I am intrigued! Maybe I'll have to go with the French tipper
(at least I think he was French) on the new scope speculation,
something about hyper..... Maybe I ought to scour the Antarctic
observatory photos for ideas. I am on every list, so hopefully
notification and finances will intercept.
Enjoy the holidays and I hope you get to see all of the Hawaiian
islands, not just Oahu!

Sincerely,
Greg

On Dec 13, 2007, at 13:00, chris1011@... wrote:

In a message dated 12/13/2007 11:45:45 AM Central Standard Time,
gnpnotti@... writes:

Rolando,
Awesome!!! Put a telescope on each of the mounts and I'll make it
my wallpaper.
I plan to do that soon - gotta finish the appropriate scope for El
Big One.
But first I am heading off to Hawaii this weekend for the holidays
for some R&R
(Marj too). When I get back there will be more 140 shipping, plus I am
working on the first half of the 130F6 lenses (already polished but
not figured).

Rolando

**************************************
See AOL's top rated recipes
(http://food.aol.com/top-rated-recipes?NCID=aoltop00030000000004)





Re: Desperately trying (this is the correct one) ... (Happy) end...

Joe Zeglinski
 

Hi Stuart,

Straying a bit OT, I just wanted to comment about using an old "portable"
laptop in the cold.

Last year I decided to run a series of cold soak test of an old IBM laptop
in my garage, at about the freezing mark. I eventually destroyed the laptop
because the LCD screen hinges broke away from the body. Laptop plastic is
really meant for benign California weather conditions, and is not made of
tough thermo plastic. The springs that hold the screen raised up, are VERY
strong (I had them apart, eventually), and they are typically held to the body
by two tiny screws into a press fitted brass screw socket. There is also an
intentional TENSION or friction brake system to prevent the LCD from slamming
shut, and also to let you adjust the screen tilt angle - more work for the
hinges against that brake pressure. As you open or close the LCD, the springs
really stress these screw connections, on the two barrel tortion springs.

If the case doesn't crack, the brass sockets will break away and rip free
of the plastic base, as in my case. If you have an expensive "ruggedized"
laptop, with a case made of magnesium, then "maybe" those hinges would be
screwed into the metal frame, allowing it to be used "normally" in arctic
conditions in military or industrial applications. Consumer laptops are not
really meant for operation in outdoor winter conditions, without extra care.

My plan for laptop use is to leave the lid always open, and only to close
the laptop LCD screen after it has been warmed up for about 10 minutes in a
heated car, or in the house. It makes it clumsy to carry, screen raised, but
much better than wrecking an expensive laptop in the freezing cold. Then
again, it will likely get soaking wet inside, as it warms up while it is
open - perhaps having it running as it warms up externally, might keep the dew
inside at bay. Remember, the spec on laptops is for use "above freezing" -
perhaps because of this "case fragility"reason.

Joe

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tom Carrico" <tom@...>
To: <ap-gto@...>
Sent: Thursday, December 13, 2007 12:34 PM
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: Desperately trying (this is the correct one) ...
(Happy) end...


Hi Stuart,
I have used the wireless (and ethernet wired) route with a laptop local
to the telescope. That has worked and my only real issue is that the
screen updates are always slower than direct connecting a PC. I know I
am whining a bit, as it is a minor quibble. Also, I do worry about
wearing out the laptop at the telescope, as in the winter it often gets
well below zero. I know I could put the laptop in a small box, but since
my current solution does work, I have not gone any further on the
wireless route. However, I do agree that it is a very good solution as
it removes some of the extender and converter issues.

Tom C


Re: New file uploaded to ap-gto

Gregory Nottingham <gnpnotti@...>
 

Rolando,
Thanks. I guess I date myself as to when I became AP-aware.

Sincerely,
Greg

On Dec 13, 2007, at 12:55, chris1011@... wrote:

In a message dated 12/13/2007 11:48:19 AM Central Standard Time,
gnpnotti@... writes:

I meant to ask, what is the small mount all the way in the back with
the small scope? I assume the one next to the AP 900 and AP 1200 is
the Mach 1.
The one in the back is the 400 mount with the 105 Traveler mounted
on it.

Rolando

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Re: Desperately trying (this is the correct one) ... (Happy) end...

Richard Crisp
 

has anyone considered using either a diskless node or using a solid state drive for the "cold" computer? the solid state drives are really coming down in price and I did see an adaptor offered some time back that will convert a USB FLASH thumb drive to a bootable ATA drive from the perspective of the computer.

it may be a way to avoid the problems that extreme cold can cause when it comes to rotating media.



S HEGGIE <stuart.j.heggie@...> wrote:

Tom, I agree that the laptop strains sometimes in the cold. Up here, 100
miles north of Toronto, I have had to bring the laptop into the house to
boot it up (on really cold days) and then return it to the observatory. I
don't like subjecting it to those rapid temp changes you can be sure. Since
I have a manually rolled off roof, I need to go out there anyway to start a
session so it gives me the flexibility to start things off as if I'm staying
out and when it is all up and running I return to the house and operate it
from there.

Stuart

From: Tom Carrico <tom@...>
Reply-To: ap-gto@...
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: Desperately trying (this is the correct one) ...
(Happy) end...
Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2007 09:34:27 -0800

Hi Stuart,
I have used the wireless (and ethernet wired) route with a laptop local
to the telescope. That has worked and my only real issue is that the
screen updates are always slower than direct connecting a PC. I know I
am whining a bit, as it is a minor quibble. Also, I do worry about
wearing out the laptop at the telescope, as in the winter it often gets
well below zero. I know I could put the laptop in a small box, but since
my current solution does work, I have not gone any further on the
wireless route. However, I do agree that it is a very good solution as
it removes some of the extender and converter issues.

Tom C

S HEGGIE wrote:
Tom, for the trip between house and observatory, what about wireless?
That
is what I do and it seems to work like a charm. I use a program called
UltraVNC. The old laptop in the observatory runs the server version and
the
house computer runs the client/viewer version. I use USB and USB->Serial
converters to talk to my AP900GTO, SBIG camera and Robofocus. Seems
stable
enough. The house is about 80 feet from the observatory. I'm running
CCDSoft5, TheSky6 and Focusmax on the laptop btw.

Stuart


From: Tom Carrico <tom@...>
Reply-To: ap-gto@...
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: Desperately trying (this is the correct one)
...
(Happy) end...
Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2007 08:43:08 -0800

There are issues with USB that have bit me in this hobby. The first is
the length limitation. I image while sitting in my house and that is
too
far for USB, but no problem for serial (or ethernet). I have used a
number of USB extenders and they seem to work okay if all I have
connected at the remote end is the SBIG camera. If I also connect a
USB
to serial convertor at the remote end I occasionally get system hang
ups. I have tried numerous brands of USB extenders and USB-Serial
converters and different computers. Every single one has at least once
caused a system hang up when using a USB-serial converter, which is
solved by removing the USB extender. Now, I have a USB extender for the
camera only and directly attach the USB-Serial converter to a port on
the laptop and run long serial cables to my mount and focuser. That
setup has never, ever hung.
The other thing I don't like about USB is that there is no positive
connection at the camera, it is a friction fit. Perhaps there is a
solution for this, but I have not run across it.
My wish would be for the astronomy community to dump USB all together
and go to an ethernet solution. I am okay with serial for now, but
would
like to see all interfaces migrate to one standard..
Tom Carrico
http://www.ccdargo.com


Salyer wrote:

Since almost no computer today provides a serial interface we all
need to use some type of serial converter. I suspect that the
majority of people use a USB to serial converter. If there is a
problem with USB (which I've never seen) then we've got the problem
anyway.

Greg

At 11:13 AM 12/13/2007, you wrote:



In a message dated 12/13/2007 10:06:39 AM Central Standard Time,
<mailto:rdcrisp%40sbcglobal.net>rdcrisp@... writes:



someone ought to tell microsoft, intel and the rest of the PC
industry
as

well as all the camera and printer manufacturers that they have
chosen
an

unreliable interface: that's the most commonly used interface on

the planet these


days for connecting peripherals to computers.

I am confident this will be news to them, Roland.


I think they are dealing with a completely different issue than we
are.

Rolando

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see http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gto
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Re: New file uploaded to ap-gto

uthin8er <lleege@...>
 

Oh. man! Put me on another list! Mak-Cas?
I plan to do that soon - gotta finish the appropriate scope for El
Big One.


Re: New file uploaded to ap-gto

Gregory Nottingham <gnpnotti@...>
 

I meant to ask, what is the small mount all the way in the back with
the small scope? I assume the one next to the AP 900 and AP 1200 is
the Mach 1.

Sincerely,
Greg

On Dec 13, 2007, at 12:32, chris1011@... wrote:

In a message dated 12/13/2007 11:31:28 AM Central Standard Time,
ap-gto@... writes:

You can access this file at the URL:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gto/files/3600%20El%20Capitan/
showroom112907-1.jpg

I just posted this picture of our showroom which now has one of
each of our
mounts. Compare the large one with the rest of our lineup.

Rolando

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Re: New file uploaded to ap-gto

Gregory Nottingham <gnpnotti@...>
 

Rolando,
Awesome!!! Put a telescope on each of the mounts and I'll make it
my wallpaper.

Greg

On Dec 13, 2007, at 12:32, chris1011@... wrote:

In a message dated 12/13/2007 11:31:28 AM Central Standard Time,
ap-gto@... writes:

You can access this file at the URL:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gto/files/3600%20El%20Capitan/
showroom112907-1.jpg

I just posted this picture of our showroom which now has one of
each of our
mounts. Compare the large one with the rest of our lineup.

Rolando

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Re: Desperately trying (this is the correct one) ... (Happy) end...

S HEGGIE <stuart.j.heggie@...>
 

Tom, I agree that the laptop strains sometimes in the cold. Up here, 100 miles north of Toronto, I have had to bring the laptop into the house to boot it up (on really cold days) and then return it to the observatory. I don't like subjecting it to those rapid temp changes you can be sure. Since I have a manually rolled off roof, I need to go out there anyway to start a session so it gives me the flexibility to start things off as if I'm staying out and when it is all up and running I return to the house and operate it from there.

Stuart

From: Tom Carrico <tom@...>
Reply-To: ap-gto@...
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: Desperately trying (this is the correct one) ... (Happy) end...
Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2007 09:34:27 -0800

Hi Stuart,
I have used the wireless (and ethernet wired) route with a laptop local
to the telescope. That has worked and my only real issue is that the
screen updates are always slower than direct connecting a PC. I know I
am whining a bit, as it is a minor quibble. Also, I do worry about
wearing out the laptop at the telescope, as in the winter it often gets
well below zero. I know I could put the laptop in a small box, but since
my current solution does work, I have not gone any further on the
wireless route. However, I do agree that it is a very good solution as
it removes some of the extender and converter issues.

Tom C

S HEGGIE wrote:
Tom, for the trip between house and observatory, what about wireless?
That
is what I do and it seems to work like a charm. I use a program called
UltraVNC. The old laptop in the observatory runs the server version and
the
house computer runs the client/viewer version. I use USB and USB->Serial
converters to talk to my AP900GTO, SBIG camera and Robofocus. Seems
stable
enough. The house is about 80 feet from the observatory. I'm running
CCDSoft5, TheSky6 and Focusmax on the laptop btw.

Stuart


From: Tom Carrico <tom@...>
Reply-To: ap-gto@...
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: Desperately trying (this is the correct one)
...
(Happy) end...
Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2007 08:43:08 -0800

There are issues with USB that have bit me in this hobby. The first is
the length limitation. I image while sitting in my house and that is
too
far for USB, but no problem for serial (or ethernet). I have used a
number of USB extenders and they seem to work okay if all I have
connected at the remote end is the SBIG camera. If I also connect a
USB
to serial convertor at the remote end I occasionally get system hang
ups. I have tried numerous brands of USB extenders and USB-Serial
converters and different computers. Every single one has at least once
caused a system hang up when using a USB-serial converter, which is
solved by removing the USB extender. Now, I have a USB extender for the
camera only and directly attach the USB-Serial converter to a port on
the laptop and run long serial cables to my mount and focuser. That
setup has never, ever hung.
The other thing I don't like about USB is that there is no positive
connection at the camera, it is a friction fit. Perhaps there is a
solution for this, but I have not run across it.
My wish would be for the astronomy community to dump USB all together
and go to an ethernet solution. I am okay with serial for now, but
would
like to see all interfaces migrate to one standard..
Tom Carrico
http://www.ccdargo.com


Salyer wrote:

Since almost no computer today provides a serial interface we all
need to use some type of serial converter. I suspect that the
majority of people use a USB to serial converter. If there is a
problem with USB (which I've never seen) then we've got the problem
anyway.

Greg

At 11:13 AM 12/13/2007, you wrote:



In a message dated 12/13/2007 10:06:39 AM Central Standard Time,
<mailto:rdcrisp%40sbcglobal.net>rdcrisp@... writes:



someone ought to tell microsoft, intel and the rest of the PC
industry
as

well as all the camera and printer manufacturers that they have
chosen
an

unreliable interface: that's the most commonly used interface on

the planet these


days for connecting peripherals to computers.

I am confident this will be news to them, Roland.


I think they are dealing with a completely different issue than we
are.

Rolando

To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list
see http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gto
Yahoo! Groups Links









To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list
see http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gto
Yahoo! Groups Links