Date   

Mach1 GTO/Eagle6 Pier for Sale

Robert Malinowski
 

If anyone is interested, I just placed an ad for
this combo on Astromart...Used once...Purchased
May 2008
http://www.astromart.com/classifieds/details.asp?classified_id=574890


Re: Solar prominence sketch

Bill Bradford
 

Hi Jeff,
The fact that you can produce sketches of that quality in 15 mins is even more impressive.
Regards,
Bill

----- Original Message -----
From: Jeff Young
To: ap-gto@...
Sent: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 8:41 PM
Subject: RE: [ap-gto] Solar prominence sketch


Thanks, everyone!

Bill --

Actually, I haven't been doing it that long. I started deep-sky sketching about a year ago (when comet 17P Holmes "exploded"), and added solar sketching this spring. One of my recent deep-sky efforts can be found here: http://www.rokeby.ie/observatory/Sketches/M3.2008.05.01.jpg .

I started h-alpha sketching with a double-stacked SolarMax40: sketches with that instrument take about 7 minutes. The one I posted was done with a Solarscope SF70, which provides much more detail: sketches with that instrument take 10 - 15 minutes. I think I'm about at the limit though; much longer than 15 minutes and the prominence will have noticeably changed.

Cheers,
-- Jeff.

From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...] On Behalf Of Bill Bradford
Sent: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 5:55 PM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Solar prominence sketch

Wow, that is a great sketch. I'm assuming that you have been do this for quite some time.

The quality is excellent. How long did it take you to complete the sketch?

Regards,
Bill


Re: Is the auto guider cable necessary?

Jeff <jlc@...>
 

I'm also using maxim for guiding.... I've done the serial port thing and it
does work, but I'm told there is some latency using the commands. Afaict,
there is no advantage.

Here's a tip...

I also setup/teardown each night (portable to remote locations, etc.)....
What I did is take _all_ the cables between the computer and the mount,
including camera USB cables (guider and imager), imaging camera power, etc,
about 7 cables and put them in a "loom".
http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2103809
I also marked the ends of the cables with what they are. (e.g. the
autoguider cable looks just like the robofocus cable)

1) The cables are all ready to go for a trip -- no lost cables.
2) Tangles are actually minimized by the loom... saves time.
3) The loom gets anchored on the OTA... snags are less of a problem w/ the
big loom.

(Btw, the autoguider cable exits the loom before reaching the OTA.)

jeff




_____

From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...] On Behalf Of
John Murphy
Sent: Wednesday, July 16, 2008 2:34 PM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: [ap-gto] Is the auto guider cable necessary?



Hi all,
I do not have a dome so I set up my mount and telescope each night.
Some of the set up time is spent connecting cables and checking that
they will not snag.

I am aware that with MaximDL it is possible to auto guide via the
mount's serial port instead of using the auto guider cable. Sounds
great, but are there any down sides to this arrangement? or advantages?
Do many people do this?

Thanks
John Murphy


Is the auto guider cable necessary?

John Murphy
 

Hi all,
I do not have a dome so I set up my mount and telescope each night.
Some of the set up time is spent connecting cables and checking that
they will not snag.

I am aware that with MaximDL it is possible to auto guide via the
mount's serial port instead of using the auto guider cable. Sounds
great, but are there any down sides to this arrangement? or advantages?
Do many people do this?

Thanks
John Murphy


Re: Missing something in "North Polar Calibrate" procedure

Howard Hedlund
 

My pleasure, Joe! I am always glad and much relieved when a post
actually helps someone!



Mag. 7 skies!



Howard Hedlund

Astro-Physics, Inc.

815-282-1513

________________________________

From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...] On Behalf
Of Joseph Zeglinski
Sent: Wednesday, July 16, 2008 4:25 PM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Missing something in "North Polar Calibrate"
procedure



Thanks Howard,

I really appreciate your effort in getting me straightened out on this.
I must have read that section of the Keypad guide more than a dozen
times,
over the past year - with my mind putting its own spin on the words.
Step #1
mentions having the polar axis aligned on the north pole, but I was
jumping
ahead and thinking the mount (OTA) was to be in Park #3 - as an "N Pole
Calibration" pseudo-star starting point, of a simplified "2 Star
Calibration" procedure.

Now it all makes sense. I'm glad I asked the question of how the
firmware
really works.

Regards,
Joe


Re: Missing something in "North Polar Calibrate" procedure

Joe Zeglinski
 

Thanks Howard,

I really appreciate your effort in getting me straightened out on this. I must have read that section of the Keypad guide more than a dozen times, over the past year - with my mind putting its own spin on the words. Step #1 mentions having the polar axis aligned on the north pole, but I was jumping ahead and thinking the mount (OTA) was to be in Park #3 - as an "N Pole Calibration" pseudo-star starting point, of a simplified "2 Star Calibration" procedure.

Now it all makes sense. I'm glad I asked the question of how the firmware really works.

Regards,
Joe


Re: AP400 borderline

waelchlih
 

John,

I've already done that. He wrote me that there was nothing special
with the set-up ant that there are no special tricks... But maybe what
he is calling "no trick" is secret for the others... You're right with
Johannes. Maybe perhaps he could tell me the used guider settings...

Thank you for the tip to check reversing. I will do that.

Clear Skies
Hansjoerg

--- In ap-gto@..., john gleason <dvj@...> wrote:

I highly recommend you ask Johannes how he did the setup for his
AP400 and TEC140. The man does amazing work. Attention to balance in
RA and DEC are key to good tracking with any small mount. Also, take
some time learning the autoguider settings that will work with this
mount.

I took my 400 mount to Australia once, but when I got there, the RA
motor would not southern hemisphere reverse. Surprise! Something I
had not checked at home prior to the trip.

Good Luck!

jg




-----Original Message-----
From: waelchlih <waelchlisjunk@...>
Sent: Jul 16, 2008 5:52 AM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: [ap-gto] AP400 borderline

Hello

I'm in the final "preparation phase" for a trip to southern Africa
(Namibia) where I want to do astro imaging. Owning a TEC140 and an
AP600 it would be great to have this equipment there and "shooting"
with the STL11K. As transport (airline) limits acceptable weight a
friend borrows me his AP400GTO what saves some worthy pounds. While
doing some tests at home I now had to find out that guiding with that
mount does not seem to be really easily possible with good results. I
know that the setup _is borderline_ but as shown by renowned
photographers it is feasible to work with it. As an example, Johannes
Schedler (http://www.panther-observatory.com) used exactly the same
mount/scope/camera setup in 2006 with great success.

So - what can be done to improve tracking? The mount has been slightly
misbalanced in RA/DE and sat on top of a losmandy (short legged)
tripod on a wind-shielded balcony.

By the way: What happens to a mount when severly overloading it?

Clear skies - and many thanks for your helpful hints.

Hansjoerg Waelchli


Re: AP400 borderline

John Gleason
 

I highly recommend you ask Johannes how he did the setup for his AP400 and TEC140. The man does amazing work. Attention to balance in RA and DEC are key to good tracking with any small mount. Also, take some time learning the autoguider settings that will work with this mount.

I took my 400 mount to Australia once, but when I got there, the RA motor would not southern hemisphere reverse. Surprise! Something I had not checked at home prior to the trip.

Good Luck!

jg

-----Original Message-----
From: waelchlih <waelchlisjunk@...>
Sent: Jul 16, 2008 5:52 AM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: [ap-gto] AP400 borderline

Hello

I'm in the final "preparation phase" for a trip to southern Africa
(Namibia) where I want to do astro imaging. Owning a TEC140 and an
AP600 it would be great to have this equipment there and "shooting"
with the STL11K. As transport (airline) limits acceptable weight a
friend borrows me his AP400GTO what saves some worthy pounds. While
doing some tests at home I now had to find out that guiding with that
mount does not seem to be really easily possible with good results. I
know that the setup _is borderline_ but as shown by renowned
photographers it is feasible to work with it. As an example, Johannes
Schedler (http://www.panther-observatory.com) used exactly the same
mount/scope/camera setup in 2006 with great success.

So - what can be done to improve tracking? The mount has been slightly
misbalanced in RA/DE and sat on top of a losmandy (short legged)
tripod on a wind-shielded balcony.

By the way: What happens to a mount when severly overloading it?

Clear skies - and many thanks for your helpful hints.

Hansjoerg Waelchli


Re: Solar prominence sketch

Jeff Young <jey@...>
 

Edd --

My solar sketches are white pencil (Derwent Graphitint) on black paper (Strathmore Artagain). White paper is too blinding during the day.

My deep-sky sketches are black pencil on white paper (Daler-Rowney cartridge); they are then inverted in Photoshop.

-- Jeff.


From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...] On Behalf Of eddwen2001
Sent: Wednesday, July 16, 2008 7:54 AM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: [ap-gto] Re: Solar prominence sketch


Jeff, as others have said nice work! Just one other question. Do
you sketch white on black or black on white and then reverse the
sketch when scanned?

Thx,

Edd Weninger
New Solarmax 90 piggy-backed on my A-P 155/A-P 155
-fascinating stuff even at solar minimum right now

--- In ap-gto@...<mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com>, Jeff Young <jey@...> wrote:

Thanks, everyone!

Bill --

Actually, I haven't been doing it that long. I started deep-sky
sketching about a year ago (when comet 17P Holmes "exploded"), and
added solar sketching this spring. One of my recent deep-sky efforts
can be found here:
http://www.rokeby.ie/observatory/Sketches/M3.2008.05.01.jpg .

I started h-alpha sketching with a double-stacked SolarMax40:
sketches with that instrument take about 7 minutes. The one I posted
was done with a Solarscope SF70, which provides much more detail:
sketches with that instrument take 10 - 15 minutes. I think I'm
about at the limit though; much longer than 15 minutes and the
prominence will have noticeably changed.

Cheers,
-- Jeff.


From: ap-gto@...<mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:ap-gto@...<mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com>] On
Behalf Of Bill Bradford
Sent: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 5:55 PM
To: ap-gto@...<mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Solar prominence sketch


Wow, that is a great sketch. I'm assuming that you have been do
this for quite some time.

The quality is excellent. How long did it take you to complete the
sketch?

Regards,
Bill






Re: AP400 borderline

waelchlih
 

Roland,

Maybe "not guiding" is the wrong word. Bad tracking is better. I get
bad tracking - with small (2 to 4 asec) but quite fast - variations in
RA. To my non-expert knowledge this looks like signs of overloading
... But how can others bring the same mount to good tracking?

Clear Skies - and thank you
Hansjoerg

--- In ap-gto@..., chris1011@... wrote:

In a message dated 7/16/2008 7:53:12 AM Central Daylight Time,
waelchlisjunk@... writes:


While
doing some tests at home I now had to find out that guiding with that
mount does not seem to be really easily possible with good results.
What does the mount do that makes it not guide?

Rolando


**************
Get the scoop on last night's hottest shows and the live
music scene in your area - Check out TourTracker.com!

(http://www.tourtracker.com?NCID=aolmus00050000000112)




Re: Missing something in "North Polar Calibrate" procedure

Howard Hedlund
 

Hi Joe,



First off, beginning the procedure by "commanding the scope to Park
Position #3" is NOT in the instructions, and is not a part of the
routine. Park 3 may be near to Polaris, but it is not the servo's
reference park position, which is Park 1 - scope horizontal on west side
of mount - pointing at the northern horizon (southern horizon in the
southern hemisphere) and CW shaft horizontal and pointing east (northern
and southern hemispheres). The North Polar Calibration Routine uses
the first reference star from Step #3 (which is NOT Polaris) as its
initial reference point. Since the reference point is not established
until you select that star from the menu and press GoTo, moving the
scope manually or using the NEWS buttons prior to this does not have any
effect. Using either the North Polar Calibration or the Two Star
Calibration in the Keypad will negate any previous reference and
establish a new reference beginning with the first calibration star that
you choose.



If you wish to use a park position in your start up routine, use
Reference Park Position 1 as described above, and choose 4=Resume from
Reference Park after entering your location number. Then go straight
to the GTO Quick Star Drift Method which has been described more fully
in the latest keypad manual. This method allows you to use GoTo's to
do your alignment. BTW: There is also a list of stars in Appendix I
that was added for the GTO Quick Drift Method that you will find useful
for selecting a first star whether using the GTO Quick Drift or either
of the keypad's two methods. The table of stars is arranged in rows of
relatively close RA values.



You can also enter the Polar Calibration Menus by pressing 2=Setup;
4=Park / Mount Opt.; 4=Calibrate Menu at any time. Just remember,
the first star that you select in either routine will establish the new
reference point. The mount does NOT go to that star. You are
effectively telling the mount that you are there when you select the
first star in either routine. You could, of course: 1. Start from
Reference Park 1; 2. Go to a star (you should be within the ballpark
so to speak); 3. Center the star; 4. Enter the Polar Calibration
method of your choice and then simply select the star you just went to
as your first star in the routine.



Think about Park Position 3 for a moment. Park 3 points at the pole -
not at Polaris. How can pointing at the pole establish a position?
Certainly the declination value at the pole is 90 deg; that's easy, but
what is the RA value? The fact is that it can be anything, and is
therefore effectively undefined at the pole. This is why Park3 is NOT
the reference park position, and is useless in any polar alignment
routine. It also explains why orthogonality is so critical to the
North Polar Routine. Since Polaris is so close to the actual pole, a
relatively small orthogonality error can amount to a relatively huge RA
error. It is also why we prefer the Two Star Calibration for most
situations as we state in the instructions.



Finally, the star coordinates are listed for each star before you commit
to selecting that star. If you press the number 1 - 2 or 3 to choose a
potential calibration star, the coordinates will be displayed without
any calibration action being taken. If the coordinates aren't what you
want, simply press the <Prev button to go back to the list and choose
another star. To display the coordinates up front would require that
the star list be scrolled through one at a time, which would get rather
tedious.



Mag. 7 skies!



Howard Hedlund

Astro-Physics, Inc.

815-282-1513

________________________________

From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...] On Behalf
Of Joseph Zeglinski
Sent: Wednesday, July 16, 2008 1:49 AM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: [ap-gto] Missing something in "North Polar Calibrate" procedure



Hi,

I'm a bit confused about a step in this procedure - perhaps somebody can
tell me what is really going on with the Keypad program.

In following the "N Polar Calibrate" series of steps,
Step #3 tells me to "move the scope by hand" to the calibration star,
then use the "NEWS" buttons to centre the star in the eyepiece.

Now this seems really odd.
Having just commanded the system to Park Position #3 as the zero
reference (pointing at Polaris, with counterweight down), then
"unlocking the axes" and pushing the scope to the calibration star,
while the servos are still pointing at Polaris, I am supposed to
(finally) jog the target into the centre of the FOV using the NEWS
buttons.
Doesn't this last step of using the NEWS buttons, ruin the initial
Position #3 servo reference?
It effectively adds a delta RA/DEC to the zero reference, even before
the ALT/AZ manual adjustment on Polaris, can be made.

Perhaps this NEWS button bias doesn't add that much error to the
procedure in exchange for a bit of user convenience, and will eventually
be iterated out after a few swings?

**********
Another point, I really don't see the NEED to "manually push the OTA" to
the calibration star. It seems to me that if the system is set in Park
Position #3, I should be able to tell the firmware to do a GOTO to the
selected calibration star, and I would then simply add the NEWS button
RA/DEC delta when it got there.
Surely, with all the location and date/time information, and a known
starting reference point (Park #3), it really doesn't need my unlocking
the axes and pushing the OTA. The firmware should be capable of pointing
the scope somewhat automatically.

This would be a lot easier since I wouldn't need to reference a star
atlas, or hunt the light polluted skies for the target (assuming my
selected calibration star actually is out of the tree line). Actually,
the firmware could also narrow the possible choices, and suggest a much
shorter list of "optimum" calibration star candidates, with the best RA
& DEC separation from Polaris.

***********

This brings up another question - why aren't the RA & DEC displayed for
the selected calibration star candidates?

In fact, the coordinates aren't even listed in the Appendix "D" of
calibration stars of the KEYPAD user guide - just names, designations,
and magnitudes. That doesn't help much in knowing the suitability of the
choice, other than if it might possibly be bright enough to find. The "N
Polar Calibration" procedure only displays names of stars on the Keypad,
which then requires my hunting up the coordinates in a book or laptop,
before deciding if it has a suitable difference in RA/DEC from Polaris.

Perhaps I have missed the button sequence to display these coordinates
before committing the calibration candidate star to be the target. There
must be an easier way.

Thanks for any advice,
Joe


Re: Solar prominence sketch

Edd Weninger
 

Jeff, as others have said nice work! Just one other question. Do
you sketch white on black or black on white and then reverse the
sketch when scanned?

Thx,

Edd Weninger
New Solarmax 90 piggy-backed on my A-P 155/A-P 155
-fascinating stuff even at solar minimum right now

--- In ap-gto@..., Jeff Young <jey@...> wrote:

Thanks, everyone!

Bill --

Actually, I haven't been doing it that long. I started deep-sky
sketching about a year ago (when comet 17P Holmes "exploded"), and
added solar sketching this spring. One of my recent deep-sky efforts
can be found here:
http://www.rokeby.ie/observatory/Sketches/M3.2008.05.01.jpg .

I started h-alpha sketching with a double-stacked SolarMax40:
sketches with that instrument take about 7 minutes. The one I posted
was done with a Solarscope SF70, which provides much more detail:
sketches with that instrument take 10 - 15 minutes. I think I'm
about at the limit though; much longer than 15 minutes and the
prominence will have noticeably changed.

Cheers,
-- Jeff.


From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...] On
Behalf Of Bill Bradford
Sent: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 5:55 PM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Solar prominence sketch


Wow, that is a great sketch. I'm assuming that you have been do
this for quite some time.

The quality is excellent. How long did it take you to complete the
sketch?

Regards,
Bill




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


AP400 borderline

waelchlih
 

Hello

I'm in the final "preparation phase" for a trip to southern Africa
(Namibia) where I want to do astro imaging. Owning a TEC140 and an
AP600 it would be great to have this equipment there and "shooting"
with the STL11K. As transport (airline) limits acceptable weight a
friend borrows me his AP400GTO what saves some worthy pounds. While
doing some tests at home I now had to find out that guiding with that
mount does not seem to be really easily possible with good results. I
know that the setup _is borderline_ but as shown by renowned
photographers it is feasible to work with it. As an example, Johannes
Schedler (http://www.panther-observatory.com) used exactly the same
mount/scope/camera setup in 2006 with great success.

So - what can be done to improve tracking? The mount has been slightly
misbalanced in RA/DE and sat on top of a losmandy (short legged)
tripod on a wind-shielded balcony.

By the way: What happens to a mount when severly overloading it?

Clear skies - and many thanks for your helpful hints.

Hansjoerg Waelchli


Re: AP400 borderline

Roland Christen
 

In a message dated 7/16/2008 7:53:12 AM Central Daylight Time,
waelchlisjunk@... writes:


While
doing some tests at home I now had to find out that guiding with that
mount does not seem to be really easily possible with good results.
What does the mount do that makes it not guide?

Rolando


**************
Get the scoop on last night's hottest shows and the live
music scene in your area - Check out TourTracker.com!

(http://www.tourtracker.com?NCID=aolmus00050000000112)


Backspacing in "Whats Up Tonight" Keypad tour

Joe Zeglinski
 

Hi,

I finally got around to trying the "What's Up" feature on the keypad.
However, although I could forward step and skip targets, there doesn't seem to be the ability to backstep to the previous targets. It would be nice to have this ability to return to previous items in the list, for a "second look".

I read in the guide that these are selected at random, so perhaps this prevents back stepping, since the sequence is not stored and targets are selected BINGO fashion.

If they really are sequenced randomly, then this wastes too much battery power, as the mount hops all over the sky from one source to another, and each time, you have to look very carefully in the dark, that the scope doesn't hit the pier or mount. Although, I must admit, I do enjoy the ballet that the AP-900 performs, possibly as much, or more, than the actual target.

It would be nice if the list could be optimized by shortest travel distance, so that there would be less scattered motion of the servo motors, with the resulting battery drain. Of course, some would argue that the randomness makes the tour interesting, and not repeatable. Perhaps that could be an option, if it doesn't strain keypad memory resources.

Joe


Missing something in "North Polar Calibrate" procedure

Joe Zeglinski
 

Hi,

I'm a bit confused about a step in this procedure - perhaps somebody can tell me what is really going on with the Keypad program.

In following the "N Polar Calibrate" series of steps,
Step #3 tells me to "move the scope by hand" to the calibration star, then use the "NEWS" buttons to centre the star in the eyepiece.

Now this seems really odd.
Having just commanded the system to Park Position #3 as the zero reference (pointing at Polaris, with counterweight down), then "unlocking the axes" and pushing the scope to the calibration star, while the servos are still pointing at Polaris, I am supposed to (finally) jog the target into the centre of the FOV using the NEWS buttons.
Doesn't this last step of using the NEWS buttons, ruin the initial Position #3 servo reference?
It effectively adds a delta RA/DEC to the zero reference, even before the ALT/AZ manual adjustment on Polaris, can be made.

Perhaps this NEWS button bias doesn't add that much error to the procedure in exchange for a bit of user convenience, and will eventually be iterated out after a few swings?

**********
Another point, I really don't see the NEED to "manually push the OTA" to the calibration star. It seems to me that if the system is set in Park Position #3, I should be able to tell the firmware to do a GOTO to the selected calibration star, and I would then simply add the NEWS button RA/DEC delta when it got there.
Surely, with all the location and date/time information, and a known starting reference point (Park #3), it really doesn't need my unlocking the axes and pushing the OTA. The firmware should be capable of pointing the scope somewhat automatically.

This would be a lot easier since I wouldn't need to reference a star atlas, or hunt the light polluted skies for the target (assuming my selected calibration star actually is out of the tree line). Actually, the firmware could also narrow the possible choices, and suggest a much shorter list of "optimum" calibration star candidates, with the best RA & DEC separation from Polaris.

***********

This brings up another question - why aren't the RA & DEC displayed for the selected calibration star candidates?

In fact, the coordinates aren't even listed in the Appendix "D" of calibration stars of the KEYPAD user guide - just names, designations, and magnitudes. That doesn't help much in knowing the suitability of the choice, other than if it might possibly be bright enough to find. The "N Polar Calibration" procedure only displays names of stars on the Keypad, which then requires my hunting up the coordinates in a book or laptop, before deciding if it has a suitable difference in RA/DEC from Polaris.

Perhaps I have missed the button sequence to display these coordinates before committing the calibration candidate star to be the target. There must be an easier way.

Thanks for any advice,
Joe


Re: Solar prominence sketch

Paul M
 

wonderful sketch Jeff. The detail is amazing, and better than any solar photo I could ever take.
How long does it take you to make a drawing like this?

cheers,
...paul.


Re: Solar prominence sketch

Jeff Young <jey@...>
 

Thanks, everyone!

Bill --

Actually, I haven't been doing it that long. I started deep-sky sketching about a year ago (when comet 17P Holmes "exploded"), and added solar sketching this spring. One of my recent deep-sky efforts can be found here: http://www.rokeby.ie/observatory/Sketches/M3.2008.05.01.jpg .

I started h-alpha sketching with a double-stacked SolarMax40: sketches with that instrument take about 7 minutes. The one I posted was done with a Solarscope SF70, which provides much more detail: sketches with that instrument take 10 - 15 minutes. I think I'm about at the limit though; much longer than 15 minutes and the prominence will have noticeably changed.

Cheers,
-- Jeff.


From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...] On Behalf Of Bill Bradford
Sent: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 5:55 PM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Solar prominence sketch


Wow, that is a great sketch. I'm assuming that you have been do this for quite some time.

The quality is excellent. How long did it take you to complete the sketch?

Regards,
Bill


Re: Solar prominence sketch

Bill Bradford
 

Wow, that is a great sketch. I'm assuming that you have been do this for quite some time.

The quality is excellent. How long did it take you to complete the sketch?

Regards,
Bill

----- Original Message -----
From: Jeff Young
To: ap-gto@...
Sent: Tuesday, July 15, 2008 12:34 PM
Subject: [ap-gto] Solar prominence sketch


Well, I realize this group is heavily astro-photography based, but
here's my attempt to even things out a bit. This solar prominence
sketch was done with a Solarscope SF70 h-alpha filter on a TV Pronto
riding on an AP400QMD.

http://www.rokeby.ie/observatory/Sketches/SolarProm.2008.06.19.2.jpg

Cheers,
-- Jeff.


Re: Solar prominence sketch

Mark Jenkins
 

Very nice sketch Jeff!

If I ever attempted such a thing it would probably look like a 4 year
old sketched it. LOL!

Mark

On Jul 15, 2008, at 12:34 PM, Jeff Young wrote:

Well, I realize this group is heavily astro-photography based, but
here's my attempt to even things out a bit. This solar prominence
sketch was done with a Solarscope SF70 h-alpha filter on a TV Pronto
riding on an AP400QMD.

http://www.rokeby.ie/observatory/Sketches/SolarProm.2008.06.19.2.jpg

Cheers,
-- Jeff.