Date   

Re: learning - question about mach1gto RA and DEC clutch knobs

robert@...
 

Now I think I understand. I had visions of tightening the knob next to the counterweight shaft while pointed at the pole and the scope tilting "up", because the RA axis was somehow sagging, but all of the clutching is independent. Nice. Now it is starting to make sense. The drag does make it a little tricky to balance with a C8 and 24#, but it's not too bad. I also imagined the increase in clutch-off drag translating to increased work for the motors, but I'll stop doing that. :)

I don't have the new gearboxes. The original owner got this Mach1 (Oct 2015) just before they came out. He did upgrade to the CP4 and I'm liking that a lot.

Thanks, Sir Rolando!

Bob

---In ap-gto@..., <chris1011@...> wrote :
When there is nothing on the mount and the knobs are unscrewed a few turns it moves pretty easily, but with weights and scope it is hard to move around. Shouldn't the bearings be handling that?
The main bearings are not part of the clutch system. The clutch part of the mount is a separate rotating assembly placed onto the main worm wheel, it is not attached to the main shaft bearings. The main bearings support only the worm wheel and axis shaft, and these do not turn when you loosen the clutches and move the scope by hand. The only way the main shaft turns is when you back the worm gear off the worm wheel via the lever on the side of the gearbox. Then the main shaft is free to spin with only finger pressure.

The clutch part is a rotating "Lazy Susan" which sits on top of the worm wheel and basically fastens the cradle plate to the top portion to the worm wheel via 3 clutch knobs. These knobs act similar to a disc brake on a car wheel. The tighter you make these knobs the tighter the top assembly is attached to the worm wheel. This rotating assembly sits on a sleeve bearing rather than another set of ball bearings, so there will naturally be more friction as you load the mount. But even with full rated load and all counterweights in place, you can still move a scope by hand when the clutch knobs are fully backed off (4 - 5 turns). 

The top rotating assembly is not intended to be part of the rotation of the mount and plays no part in pointing or tracking. In fact, for GoTo pointing or tracking the clutch knobs should be fully engaged, making the mount basically a non-clutch mount and all motion is done with the servo motors, NOT with your hands.

Rolando


Re: learning - question about mach1gto RA and DEC clutch knobs

Geoffrey Cook
 

For the “precision balancing” done with the worm disengaged by moving the levers, should the clutches be firmly tightened or loose?  Your comment that the clutches should be tight for go-to motorized movement suggests they should also be tight for the precision balancing I think.


On Oct 1, 2018, at 2:05 PM, chris1011@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:

 


When there is nothing on the mount and the knobs are unscrewed a few turns it moves pretty easily, but with weights and scope it is hard to move around. Shouldn't the bearings be handling that?
The main bearings are not part of the clutch system. The clutch part of the mount is a separate rotating assembly placed onto the main worm wheel, it is not attached to the main shaft bearings. The main bearings support only the worm wheel and axis shaft, and these do not turn when you loosen the clutches and move the scope by hand. The only way the main shaft turns is when you back the worm gear off the worm wheel via the lever on the side of the gearbox. Then the main shaft is free to spin with only finger pressure.

The clutch part is a rotating "Lazy Susan" which sits on top of the worm wheel and basically fastens the cradle plate to the top portion to the worm wheel via 3 clutch knobs. These knobs act similar to a disc brake on a car wheel. The tighter you make these knobs the tighter the top assembly is attached to the worm wheel. This rotating assembly sits on a sleeve bearing rather than another set of ball bearings, so there will naturally be more friction as you load the mount. But even with full rated load and all counterweights in place, you can still move a scope by hand when the clutch knobs are fully backed off (4 - 5 turns).

The top rotating assembly is not intended to be part of the rotation of the mount and plays no part in pointing or tracking. In fact, for GoTo pointing or tracking the clutch knobs should be fully engaged, making the mount basically a non-clutch mount and all motion is done with the servo motors, NOT with your hands.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: robert@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...>
To: ap-gto <ap-gto@...>
Sent: Mon, Oct 1, 2018 11:42 am
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] learning - question about mach1gto RA and DEC clutch knobs



I generally consider the clutch knobs to be locks and usually don't move the mount without them being unlocked, however... If I'm just setting things up and have the knobs just barely engaged, then add the weights and the scope the knobs are then quite engaged and quite tight, even though I didn't change them. What is moving? That doesn't seem right. When there is nothing on the mount and the knobs are unscrewed a few turns it moves pretty easily, but with weights and scope it is hard to move around. Shouldn't the bearings be handling that? My GM-8 mount is easy to move no matter how much weight is on the mount as long as the clutches are loose.

With the tightness of the clutch knobs changing with load it seems like you would be able to affect the pointing just by using the knobs. That don't seem right. I may just not know how these axes are put together.

Bob




Re: learning - question about mach1gto RA and DEC clutch knobs

Dan Goetz
 

I really appreciate this discussion.  Very helpful.  Thank you.

dan

On Monday, October 1, 2018, 12:05:20 PM MDT, chris1011@... [ap-gto] wrote:


 


When there is nothing on the mount and the knobs are unscrewed a few turns it moves pretty easily, but with weights and scope it is hard to move around. Shouldn't the bearings be handling that?
The main bearings are not part of the clutch system. The clutch part of the mount is a separate rotating assembly placed onto the main worm wheel, it is not attached to the main shaft bearings. The main bearings support only the worm wheel and axis shaft, and these do not turn when you loosen the clutches and move the scope by hand. The only way the main shaft turns is when you back the worm gear off the worm wheel via the lever on the side of the gearbox. Then the main shaft is free to spin with only finger pressure.

The clutch part is a rotating "Lazy Susan" which sits on top of the worm wheel and basically fastens the cradle plate to the top portion to the worm wheel via 3 clutch knobs. These knobs act similar to a disc brake on a car wheel. The tighter you make these knobs the tighter the top assembly is attached to the worm wheel. This rotating assembly sits on a sleeve bearing rather than another set of ball bearings, so there will naturally be more friction as you load the mount. But even with full rated load and all counterweights in place, you can still move a scope by hand when the clutch knobs are fully backed off (4 - 5 turns).

The top rotating assembly is not intended to be part of the rotation of the mount and plays no part in pointing or tracking. In fact, for GoTo pointing or tracking the clutch knobs should be fully engaged, making the mount basically a non-clutch mount and all motion is done with the servo motors, NOT with your hands.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: robert@... [ap-gto]
To: ap-gto Sent: Mon, Oct 1, 2018 11:42 am
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] learning - question about mach1gto RA and DEC clutch knobs



I generally consider the clutch knobs to be locks and usually don't move the mount without them being unlocked, however... If I'm just setting things up and have the knobs just barely engaged, then add the weights and the scope the knobs are then quite engaged and quite tight, even though I didn't change them. What is moving? That doesn't seem right. When there is nothing on the mount and the knobs are unscrewed a few turns it moves pretty easily, but with weights and scope it is hard to move around. Shouldn't the bearings be handling that? My GM-8 mount is easy to move no matter how much weight is on the mount as long as the clutches are loose.

With the tightness of the clutch knobs changing with load it seems like you would be able to affect the pointing just by using the knobs. That don't seem right. I may just not know how these axes are put together.

Bob




Re: learning - question about mach1gto RA and DEC clutch knobs

Roland Christen
 


When there is nothing on the mount and the knobs are unscrewed a few turns it moves pretty easily, but with weights and scope it is hard to move around. Shouldn't the bearings be handling that?
The main bearings are not part of the clutch system. The clutch part of the mount is a separate rotating assembly placed onto the main worm wheel, it is not attached to the main shaft bearings. The main bearings support only the worm wheel and axis shaft, and these do not turn when you loosen the clutches and move the scope by hand. The only way the main shaft turns is when you back the worm gear off the worm wheel via the lever on the side of the gearbox. Then the main shaft is free to spin with only finger pressure.

The clutch part is a rotating "Lazy Susan" which sits on top of the worm wheel and basically fastens the cradle plate to the top portion to the worm wheel via 3 clutch knobs. These knobs act similar to a disc brake on a car wheel. The tighter you make these knobs the tighter the top assembly is attached to the worm wheel. This rotating assembly sits on a sleeve bearing rather than another set of ball bearings, so there will naturally be more friction as you load the mount. But even with full rated load and all counterweights in place, you can still move a scope by hand when the clutch knobs are fully backed off (4 - 5 turns).

The top rotating assembly is not intended to be part of the rotation of the mount and plays no part in pointing or tracking. In fact, for GoTo pointing or tracking the clutch knobs should be fully engaged, making the mount basically a non-clutch mount and all motion is done with the servo motors, NOT with your hands.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: robert@... [ap-gto]
To: ap-gto
Sent: Mon, Oct 1, 2018 11:42 am
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] learning - question about mach1gto RA and DEC clutch knobs



I generally consider the clutch knobs to be locks and usually don't move the mount without them being unlocked, however... If I'm just setting things up and have the knobs just barely engaged, then add the weights and the scope the knobs are then quite engaged and quite tight, even though I didn't change them. What is moving? That doesn't seem right. When there is nothing on the mount and the knobs are unscrewed a few turns it moves pretty easily, but with weights and scope it is hard to move around. Shouldn't the bearings be handling that? My GM-8 mount is easy to move no matter how much weight is on the mount as long as the clutches are loose.

With the tightness of the clutch knobs changing with load it seems like you would be able to affect the pointing just by using the knobs. That don't seem right. I may just not know how these axes are put together.

Bob




Re: learning - question about mach1gto RA and DEC clutch knobs

robert@...
 

I generally consider the clutch knobs to be locks and usually don't move the mount without them being unlocked, however... If I'm just setting things up and have the knobs just barely engaged, then add the weights and the scope the knobs are then quite engaged and quite tight, even though I didn't change them. What is moving? That doesn't seem right. When there is nothing on the mount and the knobs are unscrewed a few turns it moves pretty easily, but with weights and scope it is hard to move around. Shouldn't the bearings be handling that? My GM-8 mount is easy to move no matter how much weight is on the mount as long as the clutches are loose.

With the tightness of the clutch knobs changing with load it seems like you would be able to affect the pointing just by using the knobs. That don't seem right. I may just not know how these axes are put together.

Bob


Re: learning - question about mach1gto RA and DEC clutch knobs

Roland Christen
 


I thought that it was OK to move the scope with the clutch knobs hand tight.
The clutch knobs have a range of pressure that varies from very light to locked. If you try to move the scope with the clutches locked or almost locked, you are definitely horsing the mount around and putting a lot of pressure on the worm teeth. It is the worm teeth that transmit the scope load (plus any load that your manual movement puts on them) to the tripod and ultimately to the ground. Normally this load is perfectly balanced and presents no pressure on the worm teeth, but when you push on the scope with the clutches locked, you are pushing the worm teeth directly.

It's like a car parked on a steep hill with the transmission in gear and nothing else to hold it in place. At some point of hill steepness the weight of the car will overcome the transmission's ability to hold it in place and the car will go crashing over the cliff.

When the clutches are lightly tightened, they can slip if you push on the scope and this will not put much pressure on the teeth and you can indeed move the scope around manually. In fact, once you stop the manual movement the motors will still keep the mount tracking even when the clutches are not fully locked or fully engaged. This way you can have the best of both worlds, you can scan the skies by pushing the scope around and then look at an object for a period of time while the motors are tracking it.

Roland Christen
aka Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: mike.hambrick@... [ap-gto]
To: ap-gto
Sent: Mon, Oct 1, 2018 12:32 am
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] learning - question about mach1gto RA and DEC clutch knobs



OK Now I am confused. I thought that it was OK to move the scope with the clutch knobs hand tight. At least that is what I got out of the 1100 GTO instruction manual on page 24 in the section about Understanding the RA and Dec Clutch Knobs. In section 2, the manual suggests that the user can feel how much resistance is needed to move the mount with the knobs hand tightened from the factory.

I don't normally move the scope manually, especially after I have polar aligned it and star-synced it, but in the startup sequence (with Auto-Start = No), after I have powered up the mount and keypad, and selected my location, I usually move the scope manually against the hand-tight clutch knobs to point it at the star I want to sync to.

Roland has given me some good suggestions how I can start up my mount to avoid having to do this manual movement (see posts from August 28 regarding Initial Mount Setup & Star Sync), but I have to wait until I am back in the country to try them out.


Best Regards

Michael Hambrick
ARLANXEO
TSR Global Manufacturing Support
PO Box 2000
Orange, TX 77631-2000
Phone: +1 (409) 882-2799
email: mike.hambrick@...




From:        "chris1011@... [ap-gto]" gto@...>
To:        ap-gto@...
Date:        2018-09-30 03:19 PM
Subject:        Re: [ap-gto] learning - question about mach1gto RA and DEC clutch knobs
Sent by:        ap-gto@...




 
when I can move RA and DEC by hand without damaging the worm?
You can move the RA and Dec by hand when you have the clutch knobs loose. That basically decouples the scope from the worm gear and worm wheel and allows you to move around the sky in manual mode. You can scan the sky at will without having to plug in the electronics. There will be no pressure on the worm gear teeth in this mode when you swing the mount around the sky. You can also do a rough balance of your equipment with the clutches loose.

When you want to use the mount in GoTo mode, you simply tighten the clutch knobs and then you have a GoTo mount. Now the telescope is attached directly to the worm gear and worm wheel. Trying to move the axes when the clutches are tight will put a lot of pressure on the worm teeth. If you really horse the scope around this way then it is possible for you to damage the teeth. This is not the way mounts are ever supposed to be used, and that goes for any mount.

The lever on the side of the motor box will lift the worm gear teeth off the worm wheel, and in that mode you can do a fine balance of your scope and other equipment. Lifting the teeth off the worm is only to be used for balancing, and should only be done with the scope in the Park 3 position. The reason for that is in Park 3 the scope won't suddenly dive if it is severely unbalanced. This should always be done with considerable caution while holding the scope so that it doesn't get away from you and crash into the tripod.

We added this balance lever at the request of many advanced amateurs who wanted a way to do fine adjustment of balance, which they felt was necessary for critical imaging. If you are just a visual user or do occasional imaging, there is really no need to achieve this fine balance in your setup. Rough balance using the clutches is really all you need.

Roland Christen
Astro-Physics inc.


-----Original Message-----
From: orionsway16@... [ap-gto] gto@...>
To: ap-gto gto@...>
Sent: Sun, Sep 30, 2018 12:05 am
Subject: [ap-gto] learning - question about mach1gto RA and DEC clutch knobs



Hello!

I'm trying to understand my RA and DEC clutches, when to loosen, when to tighten, and more importantly - when I can move RA and DEC by hand without damaging the worm?  Please bear with me while I explain my confusion.

I bought the mach1gto this past month. in the mach1gto manual, page 21 titled Understanding the RA and DEC Clutch Knobs, it's the 2nd and 3rd questions that seem to say the opposite, at least to me. So before I go causing damage because I'm not confident I know what I'm doing yet (or just an idiot...lol), I'm asking for guidance/help.

The 2nd question on page 21 of the manual asks "How can you find out what they really do"?  In that answer it tells to me that in order to feel the effect of the clutch knobs I should assemble the mount with plate and counterweight shaft and then wit h the clutch knobs firmly hand tightened I should feel the amount of force needed to move each axis by hand.  It goes on to tell me to move both axis to feel the resistance.  It then tells me to do the same with the telescope and weights attached.

The third question on page 21 of the manual warns me not to move the scope by hand against the "locked up" resistance achieved when I tighten up the clutches with the allen wrench or I can damage the worm wheel.  The last paragraph in this answer says most use will be fine just hand tightening the clutches.

Lastly, the 4th and last question on the page discusses tension in the mounts axis even when the clutches are loosened.

OK!  That's the framework.  My questions are these:

1. Questions 2 and 3 seem to contradict each othe r.  Question 2 says move the axis while under tension while question 3 says never move the axis while under tension for risk of damage.  I get there's a concept of "locking tight" the clutches with the use of the allen wrench but I don't seen the difference - that is, hand tight or locked tight with the wrench still seems tight to me (and question 3 says locking isn't usually necessary) and will cause damage to the worm wheel if I try moving the axis under tension like question 2 instructs me to do.  What am I missing here or confusing myself with?

2. Just to be clear, can I move my axis's by hand while the clutches are hand tight without damaging the worm wheel?  And if that answer is "yes", then how exactly do I damage the worm wheel?

2. My other question is about the last question on the page where the discussion focuses on axis ten sion even with the clutches loose.  In my case my axis's move smooth and free when the clutches are loose.  I don't feel any tension yet I've read a lot of posts where the opposite seems true for folks.  In that last question on page 21 it goes so far as to say that it should feel "stiffer" than the 900 or 1200 mounts.  My clutches, when loosened, are smooth and free - no stiffness at all, no resistance.  I feel like I'm missing something....

I want to be sure I'm handling this equipment correctly so I'm not taking anything for granted, and, taking my time working through getting to know this mount.  But at this point I'm stuck and have no interest in experimenting with how to damage my mount in the shortest time possible!  Any guidance would be appreciated.  thanks!!

dan






Re: learning - question about mach1gto RA and DEC clutch knobs

jimmyjujames
 


Do not move the scope by hand with the clutch knobs tightened and worm engaged.

My first though was that is like towing a car with the cars' emergency brake on.

That's not good on the teeth on worm, worm wheel or clutch pads.

I normally keep my clutches hand tightened and move scope with buttons to park 1 or 4, bubble level,
 power down for 10 -20 seconds, power back up and resume from park 1 or 4 (not last park position).
 
 If you want to move the scope by hand, loosen the clutches or disengage the worm.
 
 These mounts are very robust and you may get away with it but not recommended.
 Don't tow your car with the emergency brakes on.
 
 Jimmy
 A friend is someone that knows all about you but likes you anyway.
 


Re: APPM basics

Ray Gralak
 

Hi Lee,

I'm about to have another shot at building a serious pointing / tracking model. I only have visibility from 45 degrees
above the horizon and -90 to -10 dec. If I want to have a chance at unguided imaging at 0.5"/px, how many points
should I be looking to capture?
There is no hard and fast number for this because it depends on the rigidity and repeatability of the setup. Areas where randomness can enter are things like OTA optics shifting, unexpected movements in mounting and camera connections, random cable tension changes, and how well the model fits the collected data. That said, I would say a 100-150 points total (50-75 each side) should be a good starting point.

Secondly, the documentation specifies that using either of the declination point ordering strategies "place priority
towards a higher-accuracy RA tracking model" Does the hour angle strategy prioritise declination, or is it neutral?
APCC just looks at the data points and doesn't care how they were collected. However, APPM's declination point strategy tries to minimize random errors by slewing only in RA along declination "arcs". The reason is that randomly slewing both RA and Dec is more likely to introduce random pointing errors.

-Ray Gralak
Author of APCC (Astro-Physics Command Center): http://www.astro-physics.com/index.htm?products/accessories/software/apcc/apcc
Author of PEMPro V3: https://www.ccdware.com
Author of Astro-Physics V2 ASCOM Driver: https://www.siriusimaging.com/apdriver


-----Original Message-----
From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Sunday, September 30, 2018 3:01 PM
To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [ap-gto] APPM basics



Hey guys,




I'm after some basic advice in using APPM.




I'm about to have another shot at building a serious pointing / tracking model. I only have visibility from 45 degrees
above the horizon and -90 to -10 dec. If I want to have a chance at unguided imaging at 0.5"/px, how many points
should I be looking to capture?




Secondly, the documentation specifies that using either of the declination point ordering strategies "place priority
towards a higher-accuracy RA tracking model" Does the hour angle strategy prioritise declination, or is it neutral?




Cheers,

Lee


Re: Ascom driver: v5.20 and 5.10: satellite tracking and the Move Axis problem

Ray Gralak
 

Hi Richard,

Alas I found the tel.MoveAxis(1, dec_rate) is not working at all now (it used to be 15 times too slow, now it just does
not move), tel.AxisRates(0).Item(2).Maximum is still not implemented, and the telescope class
win32com.client.Dispatch("AstroPhysicsV2.Telescope") seems to have changed, causing further problems for the
ASCOM developer.
Sorry about that. That was my fault! Earlier versions of the driver were dividing the rate by 15 arc-sec/secs twice. That was corrected in beta version 5.20.02, but I accidentally deleted an extra line that copied the correctly calculated rate into the variable used to set the rate in the mount. This was corrected in the private beta 5.20.03, however there is going to be one more beta, 5.20.04 released soon.

- the tel.AxisRates(0).Item(2).Maximum method is not implemented, or not working. However, since APV2 starts
throwing exceptions when the dec rate exceeds 4.9999, it is easy to catch the exceptions and guess this number
should really be 5. So, again, not pleasant but fixable by the user.
You may be using this the wrong way. There is no AxisRates(0).Item(2). That would be a second discontinuous range of RA rates.

I assume you want to get the maximum declination rate, correct? That would be AxisRates(1).Item(1).Maximum. Note the index used on AxisRates is 1 to denote the secondary axis (Declination).

However, I did notice that both the RA/Dec rate range being returned is from 0 to 5, and I think they probably should be -5 to 5.

Code to test all the above and play with the Ascom Satellite tracker is here (of course with APv2 5.1, you may struggle
in Declination tracking):

https://sourceforge.net/projects/ascomsatellitetrack/
That sounds like a nice effort! Horizons, the program I wrote, doesn't use MoveAxis because it can set the rates directly and is not affected by the MoveAxis bug, which is probably why the bug was not noticed for a long time.

Best regards,

-Ray Gralak
Author of APCC (Astro-Physics Command Center): http://www.astro-physics.com/index.htm?products/accessories/software/apcc/apcc
Author of PEMPro V3: https://www.ccdware.com
Author of Astro-Physics V2 ASCOM Driver: https://www.siriusimaging.com/apdriver


-----Original Message-----
From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Sunday, September 30, 2018 11:12 AM
To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [ap-gto] Ascom driver: v5.20 and 5.10: satellite tracking and the Move Axis problem



Hello everybody




I have a 1100GTO and absolutely love the quality and craftmanship. I wanted to extend the use of my mount for
satellite tracking, but nothing on the market fit my need (I wanted ASCOM interface, variable rate, free and open
source, side of pier programmed by the user, simulation mode, direct use of TLE, editable track files), so I set to do my
own.




On this path I ran into some problems with the APv2 5.10 driver, problems which unfortunately have persisted and
worsened in the experimental driver APv2 5.20.




In APV2 5.10 there are 3 bugs:

- the tel.MoveAxis(1, xx) method is confusing hours and degrees (1 hour = 15 degrees), which can be fixed on the user
side by inserting a factor x15 in the code before feeding the rates to the method, so not a major problem.

- the tel.AxisRates(0).Item(2).Maximum method is not implemented, or not working. However, since APV2 starts
throwing exceptions when the dec rate exceeds 4.9999, it is easy to catch the exceptions and guess this number
should really be 5. So, again, not pleasant but fixable by the user.

-From the above 2, we can deduce and verify (see link below for a program testing this) the maximum rate in the
declination axis is 5/15=.333 degrees per seconds. This is extremely slow. So slow in fact it prevents tracking any
artificial satellite flying close to the zenith with an AP mount in equatorial station using ASCOM and the rates functions.
I know, workarounds are possible, like leap frogging with ASCOM, or using the LX protocol, or using Horizons (limited
to 1 minute refresh, a limited database of artificial satellite, no TLE support and no support for the sid e of pier). So for
a smooth tracking of satellites with an AP mount and an ASCOM compatible satellite tracker program (mine or any
other), this needs fixing by AP, as there is nothing the user or programmer can do on his/her end.




As the above problems are also preventing Eqpad to fail, apparently somebody asked for a fix and the experimental
driver 5.20 was issued. I was full of hope, thinking I could at last start using my 1100GTO CP4 for satellite work.

Alas I found the tel.MoveAxis(1, dec_rate) is not working at all now (it used to be 15 times too slow, now it just does
not move), tel.AxisRates(0).Item(2).Maximum is still not implemented, and the telescope class
win32com.client.Dispatch("AstroPhysicsV2.Telescope") seems to have changed, causing further problems for the
ASCOM developer.




So what am I asking for?

If only one thing, any AP driver where tel.MoveAxis(1, declination_rate) works and accepts maximum speeds higher
than .3 degrees per second, at least 3, ideally 5. The mount can do it when slewing, so it is purely a driver issue. This
is really a blocking and pressing issue. APv2 5.20 has not solved this according to my tests.




If we can get more than one thing worked on, can we also fix the tel.AxisRates(0).Item(2).Maximum method, and since
we are at it, in APCC, get the connection to GPS to work with any USB GPS -again there are wor k arounds, but it
would be nice.




With the above I am convinced we could get some very serious satellite tracking done with an AP 11100.




Code to test all the above and play with the Ascom Satellite tracker is here (of course with APv2 5.1, you may struggle
in Declination tracking):

https://sourceforge.net/projects/ascomsatellitetrack/





Guillaume Richard, Houston, TX

1100 GTO GTOCP4 VCP4-P01-11




Re: learning - question about mach1gto RA and DEC clutch knobs

mike.hambrick@...
 

OK Now I am confused. I thought that it was OK to move the scope with the clutch knobs hand tight. At least that is what I got out of the 1100 GTO instruction manual on page 24 in the section about Understanding the RA and Dec Clutch Knobs. In section 2, the manual suggests that the user can feel how much resistance is needed to move the mount with the knobs hand tightened from the factory.

I don't normally move the scope manually, especially after I have polar aligned it and star-synced it, but in the startup sequence (with Auto-Start = No), after I have powered up the mount and keypad, and selected my location, I usually move the scope manually against the hand-tight clutch knobs to point it at the star I want to sync to.

Roland has given me some good suggestions how I can start up my mount to avoid having to do this manual movement (see posts from August 28 regarding Initial Mount Setup & Star Sync), but I have to wait until I am back in the country to try them out.


Best Regards

Michael Hambrick
ARLANXEO
TSR Global Manufacturing Support
PO Box 2000
Orange, TX 77631-2000
Phone: +1 (409) 882-2799
email: mike.hambrick@...




From:        "chris1011@... [ap-gto]" <ap-gto@...>
To:        ap-gto@...
Date:        2018-09-30 03:19 PM
Subject:        Re: [ap-gto] learning - question about mach1gto RA and DEC clutch knobs
Sent by:        ap-gto@...




 

when I can move RA and DEC by hand without damaging the worm?
You can move the RA and Dec by hand when you have the clutch knobs loose. That basically decouples the scope from the worm gear and worm wheel and allows you to move around the sky in manual mode. You can scan the sky at will without having to plug in the electronics. There will be no pressure on the worm gear teeth in this mode when you swing the mount around the sky. You can also do a rough balance of your equipment with the clutches loose.

When you want to use the mount in GoTo mode, you simply tighten the clutch knobs and then you have a GoTo mount. Now the telescope is attached directly to the worm gear and worm wheel. Trying to move the axes when the clutches are tight will put a lot of pressure on the worm teeth. If you really horse the scope around this way then it is possible for you to damage the teeth. This is not the way mounts are ever supposed to be used, and that goes for any mount.

The lever on the side of the motor box will lift the worm gear teeth off the worm wheel, and in that mode you can do a fine balance of your scope and other equipment. Lifting the teeth off the worm is only to be used for balancing, and should only be done with the scope in the Park 3 position. The reason for that is in Park 3 the scope won't suddenly dive if it is severely unbalanced. This should always be done with considerable caution while holding the scope so that it doesn't get away from you and crash into the tripod.

We added this balance lever at the request of many advanced amateurs who wanted a way to do fine adjustment of balance, which they felt was necessary for critical imaging. If you are just a visual user or do occasional imaging, there is really no need to achieve this fine balance in your setup. Rough balance using the clutches is really all you need.

Roland Christen
Astro-Physics inc.


-----Original Message-----
From: orionsway16@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...>
To: ap-gto <ap-gto@...>
Sent: Sun, Sep 30, 2018 12:05 am
Subject: [ap-gto] learning - question about mach1gto RA and DEC clutch knobs



Hello!

I'm trying to understand my RA and DEC clutches, when to loosen, when to tighten, and more importantly - when I can move RA and DEC by hand without damaging the worm?  Please bear with me while I explain my confusion.

I bought the mach1gto this past month. in the mach1gto manual, page 21 titled Understanding the RA and DEC Clutch Knobs, it's the 2nd and 3rd questions that seem to say the opposite, at least to me. So before I go causing damage because I'm not confident I know what I'm doing yet (or just an idiot...lol), I'm asking for guidance/help.

The 2nd question on page 21 of the manual asks "How can you find out what they really do"?  In that answer it tells to me that in order to feel the effect of the clutch knobs I should assemble the mount with plate and counterweight shaft and then wit h the clutch knobs firmly hand tightened I should feel the amount of force needed to move each axis by hand.  It goes on to tell me to move both axis to feel the resistance.  It then tells me to do the same with the telescope and weights attached.

The third question on page 21 of the manual warns me not to move the scope by hand against the "locked up" resistance achieved when I tighten up the clutches with the allen wrench or I can damage the worm wheel.  The last paragraph in this answer says most use will be fine just hand tightening the clutches.

Lastly, the 4th and last question on the page discusses tension in the mounts axis even when the clutches are loosened.

OK!  That's the framework.  My questions are these:

1. Questions 2 and 3 seem to contradict each othe r.  Question 2 says move the axis while under tension while question 3 says never move the axis while under tension for risk of damage.  I get there's a concept of "locking tight" the clutches with the use of the allen wrench but I don't seen the difference - that is, hand tight or locked tight with the wrench still seems tight to me (and question 3 says locking isn't usually necessary) and will cause damage to the worm wheel if I try moving the axis under tension like question 2 instructs me to do.  What am I missing here or confusing myself with?

2. Just to be clear, can I move my axis's by hand while the clutches are hand tight without damaging the worm wheel?  And if that answer is "yes", then how exactly do I damage the worm wheel?

2. My other question is about the last question on the page where the discussion focuses on axis ten sion even with the clutches loose.  In my case my axis's move smooth and free when the clutches are loose.  I don't feel any tension yet I've read a lot of posts where the opposite seems true for folks.  In that last question on page 21 it goes so far as to say that it should feel "stiffer" than the 900 or 1200 mounts.  My clutches, when loosened, are smooth and free - no stiffness at all, no resistance.  I feel like I'm missing something....

I want to be sure I'm handling this equipment correctly so I'm not taking anything for granted, and, taking my time working through getting to know this mount.  But at this point I'm stuck and have no interest in experimenting with how to damage my mount in the shortest time possible!  Any guidance would be appreciated.  thanks!!

dan




Re: learning - question about mach1gto RA and DEC clutch knobs

Dan Goetz
 

Thank you!  It now all falls into place and makes sense.  I now notice the level of  low tension present when the clutches are unscrewed vs the no tension when I disengage the worm wheel lever.

dan


APPM basics

Lee Borsboom
 

Hey guys,


I'm after some basic advice in using APPM.


I'm about to have another shot at building a serious pointing / tracking model. I only have visibility from 45 degrees above the horizon and -90 to -10 dec. If I want to have a chance at unguided imaging at 0.5"/px, how many points should I be looking to capture?


Secondly, the documentation specifies that using either of the declination point ordering strategies "place priority towards a higher-accuracy RA tracking model" Does the hour angle strategy prioritise declination, or is it neutral? 


Cheers,

Lee


Re: learning - question about mach1gto RA and DEC clutch knobs

Roland Christen
 


when I can move RA and DEC by hand without damaging the worm?
You can move the RA and Dec by hand when you have the clutch knobs loose. That basically decouples the scope from the worm gear and worm wheel and allows you to move around the sky in manual mode. You can scan the sky at will without having to plug in the electronics. There will be no pressure on the worm gear teeth in this mode when you swing the mount around the sky. You can also do a rough balance of your equipment with the clutches loose.

When you want to use the mount in GoTo mode, you simply tighten the clutch knobs and then you have a GoTo mount. Now the telescope is attached directly to the worm gear and worm wheel. Trying to move the axes when the clutches are tight will put a lot of pressure on the worm teeth. If you really horse the scope around this way then it is possible for you to damage the teeth. This is not the way mounts are ever supposed to be used, and that goes for any mount.

The lever on the side of the motor box will lift the worm gear teeth off the worm wheel, and in that mode you can do a fine balance of your scope and other equipment. Lifting the teeth off the worm is only to be used for balancing, and should only be done with the scope in the Park 3 position. The reason for that is in Park 3 the scope won't suddenly dive if it is severely unbalanced. This should always be done with considerable caution while holding the scope so that it doesn't get away from you and crash into the tripod.

We added this balance lever at the request of many advanced amateurs who wanted a way to do fine adjustment of balance, which they felt was necessary for critical imaging. If you are just a visual user or do occasional imaging, there is really no need to achieve this fine balance in your setup. Rough balance using the clutches is really all you need.

Roland Christen
Astro-Physics inc.


-----Original Message-----
From: orionsway16@... [ap-gto]
To: ap-gto
Sent: Sun, Sep 30, 2018 12:05 am
Subject: [ap-gto] learning - question about mach1gto RA and DEC clutch knobs



Hello!

I'm trying to understand my RA and DEC clutches, when to loosen, when to tighten, and more importantly - when I can move RA and DEC by hand without damaging the worm?  Please bear with me while I explain my confusion.

I bought the mach1gto this past month. in the mach1gto manual, page 21 titled Understanding the RA and DEC Clutch Knobs, it's the 2nd and 3rd questions that seem to say the opposite, at least to me. So before I go causing damage because I'm not confident I know what I'm doing yet (or just an idiot...lol), I'm asking for guidance/help.

The 2nd question on page 21 of the manual asks "How can you find out what they really do"?  In that answer it tells to me that in order to feel the effect of the clutch knobs I should assemble the mount with plate and counterweight shaft and then wit h the clutch knobs firmly hand tightened I should feel the amount of force needed to move each axis by hand.  It goes on to tell me to move both axis to feel the resistance.  It then tells me to do the same with the telescope and weights attached.

The third question on page 21 of the manual warns me not to move the scope by hand against the "locked up" resistance achieved when I tighten up the clutches with the allen wrench or I can damage the worm wheel.  The last paragraph in this answer says most use will be fine just hand tightening the clutches.

Lastly, the 4th and last question on the page discusses tension in the mounts axis even when the clutches are loosened.

OK!  That's the framework.  My questions are these:

1. Questions 2 and 3 seem to contradict each othe r.  Question 2 says move the axis while under tension while question 3 says never move the axis while under tension for risk of damage.  I get there's a concept of "locking tight" the clutches with the use of the allen wrench but I don't seen the difference - that is, hand tight or locked tight with the wrench still seems tight to me (and question 3 says locking isn't usually necessary) and will cause damage to the worm wheel if I try moving the axis under tension like question 2 instructs me to do.  What am I missing here or confusing myself with?

2. Just to be clear, can I move my axis's by hand while the clutches are hand tight without damaging the worm wheel?  And if that answer is "yes", then how exactly do I damage the worm wheel?

2. My other question is about the last question on the page where the discussion focuses on axis ten sion even with the clutches loose.  In my case my axis's move smooth and free when the clutches are loose.  I don't feel any tension yet I've read a lot of posts where the opposite seems true for folks.  In that last question on page 21 it goes so far as to say that it should feel "stiffer" than the 900 or 1200 mounts.  My clutches, when loosened, are smooth and free - no stiffness at all, no resistance.  I feel like I'm missing something....

I want to be sure I'm handling this equipment correctly so I'm not taking anything for granted, and, taking my time working through getting to know this mount.  But at this point I'm stuck and have no interest in experimenting with how to damage my mount in the shortest time possible!  Any guidance would be appreciated.  thanks!!

dan



Ascom driver: v5.20 and 5.10: satellite tracking and the Move Axis problem

Guillaume Richard
 

Hello everybody


I have a 1100GTO and absolutely love the quality and craftmanship. I wanted to extend the use of my mount for satellite tracking, but nothing on the market fit my need (I wanted ASCOM interface, variable rate, free and open source, side of pier programmed by the user, simulation mode, direct use of TLE, editable track files), so I set to do my own.


On this path I ran into some problems with the APv2 5.10 driver, problems which unfortunately have persisted and worsened in the experimental driver APv2 5.20.


In APV2 5.10 there are 3 bugs:

- the tel.MoveAxis(1, xx) method is confusing hours and degrees (1 hour = 15 degrees), which can be fixed on the user side by inserting a factor x15 in the code before feeding the rates to the method, so not a major problem.

- the tel.AxisRates(0).Item(2).Maximum method is not implemented, or not working. However, since APV2 starts throwing exceptions when the dec rate exceeds 4.9999, it is easy to catch the exceptions and guess this number should really be 5. So, again, not pleasant but fixable by the user.

-From the above 2, we can deduce and verify (see link below for a program testing this) the maximum rate in the declination axis is 5/15=.333 degrees per seconds. This is extremely slow. So slow in fact it prevents tracking any artificial satellite flying close to the zenith with an AP mount in equatorial station using ASCOM and the rates functions. I know, workarounds are possible, like leap frogging with ASCOM, or using the LX protocol, or using Horizons (limited to 1 minute refresh, a limited database of artificial satellite, no TLE support and no support for the side of pier). So for a smooth tracking of satellites with an AP mount and an ASCOM compatible satellite tracker program (mine or any other), this needs fixing by AP, as there is nothing the user or programmer can do on his/her end.


As the above problems are also preventing Eqpad to fail, apparently somebody asked for a fix and the experimental driver 5.20 was issued. I was full of hope, thinking I could at last start using my 1100GTO CP4 for satellite work.

Alas I found the tel.MoveAxis(1, dec_rate) is not working at all now (it used to be 15 times too slow, now it just does not move), tel.AxisRates(0).Item(2).Maximum is still not implemented, and the telescope class win32com.client.Dispatch("AstroPhysicsV2.Telescope") seems to have changed, causing further problems for the ASCOM developer.


So what am I asking for?

If only one thing, any AP driver where tel.MoveAxis(1, declination_rate) works and accepts maximum speeds higher than .3 degrees per second, at least 3, ideally 5. The mount can do it when slewing, so it is purely a driver issue. This is really a blocking and pressing issue. APv2 5.20 has not solved this according to my tests.


If we can get more than one thing worked on, can we also fix the tel.AxisRates(0).Item(2).Maximum method, and since we are at it, in APCC, get the connection to GPS to work with any USB GPS -again there are work arounds, but it would be nice. 


With the above I am convinced we could get some very serious satellite tracking done with an AP 11100.


Code to test all the above and play with the Ascom Satellite tracker is here (of course with APv2 5.1, you may struggle in Declination tracking):

https://sourceforge.net/projects/ascomsatellitetrack/


Guillaume Richard, Houston, TX

1100 GTO GTOCP4 VCP4-P01-11

 


Re: ISS tracking with AP mounts ?

Robert Berta
 

I have used Satellite Tracker years ago with my Celestron fork mounted 11" scope. It worked very well. You download thee orbital elements known as TLE to the computer program. It will tell you when the satellite is about to come into view. It will slew to it and  than track smoothly. While it may not be perfectly centered there is a built in utility that moves  in a small circle and when it is centered you hit the lock in the program.  On the Celestron (it was developed to work best on the Celestron)  it tracked in nice smooth moves. At the time some other mounts also worked with it  but some (Meade LX200) wouldn't track smoothly but would move, stop, move, and so on. I believe that the secret for smooth continuous tracking was the mount had to have he ability to slew each drive in different speeds. I know that the AP mounts were supposed to work with it but not sure if continuous or jerky.  The program hasn't been updated or supported for years although is still on line for downloading. 

In use you download the TLEs (I like the one that is for the 100 brightest objects) and than highlight which ones you want and put them in an observing list.

The critical part is you have to enter the time into the computer and mount very accurately and load the latest TLEs....don't go on ones older than a week or so.

When I first used it I was at a group of about 100 scopes near San Francisco. I started tracking some satellites and all the other people there lost interest in looking through their scopes and wanted to see through mine ;-) 

It is pretty interesting as the scope tracks the satellite and the stars move out of he FOV....neat effect! 

I haven't used the program for about 10 years but this discussion is stirring my interest in trying again.

I did see the ISS with it when the station wasn't as complete as it is now....but you could certainly setup it up to photograph it.  When I was using it the state of cameras were still film based....but now a DSLR would be a natural match..

I am also wondering if Sky Safari could be used to track satellites? I have SS 6 Pro and noted that satellites are there and you can slew to them. I wonder if it could lock on and track them in real time....hmmmm....another project.


Re: VbScript for Named Park Positions

Worsel
 

With regards to other programs doing the same, Norton flags a lot of astro programs as WS.Reputation1.  This is just Norton saying, I have not seen this program many times, so I think it MIGHT be a problem.


Bryan


---In ap-gto@..., <christopher.k.erickson@...> wrote :

AVG only says that it is an "unknown program", not a virus.
 
It will let you install it anyway (Yes, it is safe. Driver does NOT have a virus.) If you read the messages carefully and follow the AVG instructions. At some point you will have to click on the "More Info" link in the warning message.
 
If you have a different anti-virus program, it might be doing something very similar.
 
AVG misfires on the ASCOM platform and many of my imaging processing programs too.
 
 
-Christopher Erickson
Observatory engineer
Summit Kinetics
Waikoloa, HI 96738
www.summitkinetics.com


Re: VbScript for Named Park Positions

Geoffrey Cook
 

Bill and Christopher, many, many thanks!  I waited longer, got a box that asked if I wanted to proceed anyway and said “yes.”  So now I am in!


On Sep 29, 2018, at 5:16 PM, Bill Long bill@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:

 

Windows Defender is significantly better than AVG, and it comes with Windows. People really should use that instead.




From: ap-gto@... <ap-gto@...> on behalf of 'Christopher Erickson' christopher.k.erickson@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...>
Sent: Saturday, September 29, 2018 2:09 PM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: RE: [ap-gto] VbScript for Named Park Positions
 
 

AVG only says that it is an "unknown program", not a virus.
 
It will let you install it anyway (Yes, it is safe. Driver does NOT have a virus.) If you read the messages carefully and follow the AVG instructions. At some point you will have to click on the "More Info" link in the warning message.
 
If you have a different anti-virus program, it might be doing something very similar.
 
AVG misfires on the ASCOM platform and many of my imaging processing programs too.
 
 
-Christopher Erickson
Observatory engineer
Summit Kinetics
Waikoloa, HI 96738
www.summitkinetics.com
 


From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...]
Sent: Saturday, September 29, 2018 9:30 AM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] VbScript for Named Park Positions

Ray, 

A different question.  I am trying to download the  latest ap v2  ascom driver version and my windows 10 computer is telling me the exe file has a virus and deletes it.  Is there a virus.  Can you suggest how I should proceed to get the v2 driver?  Thanks,

Geoff Cook

On Sep 16, 2018, at 1:15 PM, 'Ray Gralak (Groups)' groups3@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:

 

Hi everyone,

This folder contains scripts to create and park to new park positions.

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/ap-gto/files/VbScript%20Make%20New%20Park%20Positions/

NOTE: To use the VB scripts in this folder you MUST have a GTOCP4 or
a GTOCP3 with Rev "S" firmware or later.

This folder contains two VbScript files, one to create a new "named" park position,
and the other to execute a park operation to a previously created park position. The
new park position can be below the horizon, and/or with counterweight up, neither of
which the current version of APCC will let you do.

The scripts have a ".txt" file extension so that you can download them without being
deemed a virus threat by anti-virus utilities. To use these scripts download them
to your computer's desktop or another convenient location. After that, remove the ".txt"
file extension by renaming each file. If Windows or your AV utility won't let you execute
them, you may have to right click each file, select "Properties", and click the "Unblock"
button, if there is one.

IMPORTANT NOTE: to create a new named park position, you must be able to connect
to your mount via the AP V2 driver, with or without APCC.

So, to create a new named position double click the VbScript file:

CreateNamedMountParkPosition.vbs

You will be prompted for a descriptive name for the new park position. Although
the names can have spaces, do not use any characters that are illegal in a file
name or the script will fail. The script will give you a chance to this file to
slew to the desired park position, if the scope is not already positioned there.

Before saving to disk the script will display the parameters and the name of the
file it will save them in. You can confirm or cancel at that time.

If confirmed a new file will be saved in the folder "ApParkPositions" in your
Windows Documents folder. This folder will be automatically created if it does
not exist. If you ever want to remove any park positions just delete the
appropriate file in the folder. If you don't qwant to delete the file but not
have it included as a park position, then change the file extension from ".Park"
to something else.

To later park to one of the named park positions, double click this script:

ParkToNamedParkPosition.vbscript

The script will search the "Documents\ApParkPositions" folder for files with
".Park" extension and create an option list for you to select from. To park to
a location select the appropriate number in the list that is presented.

While slewing to the park position, a popup window will show up for two seconds
at a time showing the current position of the scope. If you click the Cancel button
the slew will stop. If you let the slew complete the popup window will stop appearing
and a final popup message will show for about 5 seconds indicating the mount has
been parked.

If you have any questions or problems with the scripts, please post them here and not
to my private email (thanks!)

I am offering these scripts to the community under the open source MIT license, which
means you are free to do whatever you want with them. However, as is typical in software
licenses there is no implied warranty and by using these scripts or modifications of

Best regards,

-Ray Gralak
Author of APCC (Astro-Physics Command Center): http://www.astro-physics.com/index.htm?products/accessories/software/apcc/apcc
Author of PEMPro V3: https://www.ccdware.com
Author of Astro-Physics V2 ASCOM Driver: https://www.siriusimaging.com/apdriver


Virus-free. www.avg.com


learning - question about mach1gto RA and DEC clutch knobs

Dan Goetz
 

Hello!


I'm trying to understand my RA and DEC clutches, when to loosen, when to tighten, and more importantly - when I can move RA and DEC by hand without damaging the worm?  Please bear with me while I explain my confusion.


I bought the mach1gto this past month. in the mach1gto manual, page 21 titled Understanding the RA and DEC Clutch Knobs, it's the 2nd and 3rd questions that seem to say the opposite, at least to me. So before I go causing damage because I'm not confident I know what I'm doing yet (or just an idiot...lol), I'm asking for guidance/help.


The 2nd question on page 21 of the manual asks "How can you find out what they really do"?  In that answer it tells to me that in order to feel the effect of the clutch knobs I should assemble the mount with plate and counterweight shaft and then with the clutch knobs firmly hand tightened I should feel the amount of force needed to move each axis by hand.  It goes on to tell me to move both axis to feel the resistance.  It then tells me to do the same with the telescope and weights attached.


The third question on page 21 of the manual warns me not to move the scope by hand against the "locked up" resistance achieved when I tighten up the clutches with the allen wrench or I can damage the worm wheel.  The last paragraph in this answer says most use will be fine just hand tightening the clutches.


Lastly, the 4th and last question on the page discusses tension in the mounts axis even when the clutches are loosened.


OK!  That's the framework.  My questions are these:


1. Questions 2 and 3 seem to contradict each other.  Question 2 says move the axis while under tension while question 3 says never move the axis while under tension for risk of damage.  I get there's a concept of "locking tight" the clutches with the use of the allen wrench but I don't seen the difference - that is, hand tight or locked tight with the wrench still seems tight to me (and question 3 says locking isn't usually necessary) and will cause damage to the worm wheel if I try moving the axis under tension like question 2 instructs me to do.  What am I missing here or confusing myself with?


2. Just to be clear, can I move my axis's by hand while the clutches are hand tight without damaging the worm wheel?  And if that answer is "yes", then how exactly do I damage the worm wheel?


2. My other question is about the last question on the page where the discussion focuses on axis tension even with the clutches loose.  In my case my axis's move smooth and free when the clutches are loose.  I don't feel any tension yet I've read a lot of posts where the opposite seems true for folks.  In that last question on page 21 it goes so far as to say that it should feel "stiffer" than the 900 or 1200 mounts.  My clutches, when loosened, are smooth and free - no stiffness at all, no resistance.  I feel like I'm missing something....


I want to be sure I'm handling this equipment correctly so I'm not taking anything for granted, and, taking my time working through getting to know this mount.  But at this point I'm stuck and have no interest in experimenting with how to damage my mount in the shortest time possible!  Any guidance would be appreciated.  thanks!!


dan


Re: VbScript for Named Park Positions

Bill Long
 

Windows Defender is significantly better than AVG, and it comes with Windows. People really should use that instead.




From: ap-gto@... on behalf of 'Christopher Erickson' christopher.k.erickson@... [ap-gto]
Sent: Saturday, September 29, 2018 2:09 PM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: RE: [ap-gto] VbScript for Named Park Positions
 
 

AVG only says that it is an "unknown program", not a virus.
 
It will let you install it anyway (Yes, it is safe. Driver does NOT have a virus.) If you read the messages carefully and follow the AVG instructions. At some point you will have to click on the "More Info" link in the warning message.
 
If you have a different anti-virus program, it might be doing something very similar.
 
AVG misfires on the ASCOM platform and many of my imaging processing programs too.
 
 
-Christopher Erickson
Observatory engineer
Summit Kinetics
Waikoloa, HI 96738
www.summitkinetics.com
 


From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...]
Sent: Saturday, September 29, 2018 9:30 AM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] VbScript for Named Park Positions

Ray, 

A different question.  I am trying to download the  latest ap v2  ascom driver version and my windows 10 computer is telling me the exe file has a virus and deletes it.  Is there a virus.  Can you suggest how I should proceed to get the v2 driver?  Thanks,

Geoff Cook

On Sep 16, 2018, at 1:15 PM, 'Ray Gralak (Groups)' groups3@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:

 

Hi everyone,

This folder contains scripts to create and park to new park positions.

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/ap-gto/files/VbScript%20Make%20New%20Park%20Positions/

NOTE: To use the VB scripts in this folder you MUST have a GTOCP4 or
a GTOCP3 with Rev "S" firmware or later.

This folder contains two VbScript files, one to create a new "named" park position,
and the other to execute a park operation to a previously created park position. The
new park position can be below the horizon, and/or with counterweight up, neither of
which the current version of APCC will let you do.

The scripts have a ".txt" file extension so that you can download them without being
deemed a virus threat by anti-virus utilities. To use these scripts download them
to your computer's desktop or another convenient location. After that, remove the ".txt"
file extension by renaming each file. If Windows or your AV utility won't let you execute
them, you may have to right click each file, select "Properties", and click the "Unblock"
button, if there is one.

IMPORTANT NOTE: to create a new named park position, you must be able to connect
to your mount via the AP V2 driver, with or without APCC.

So, to create a new named position double click the VbScript file:

CreateNamedMountParkPosition.vbs

You will be prompted for a descriptive name for the new park position. Although
the names can have spaces, do not use any characters that are illegal in a file
name or the script will fail. The script will give you a chance to this file to
slew to the desired park position, if the scope is not already positioned there.

Before saving to disk the script will display the parameters and the name of the
file it will save them in. You can confirm or cancel at that time.

If confirmed a new file will be saved in the folder "ApParkPositions" in your
Windows Documents folder. This folder will be automatically created if it does
not exist. If you ever want to remove any park positions just delete the
appropriate file in the folder. If you don't qwant to delete the file but not
have it included as a park position, then change the file extension from ".Park"
to something else.

To later park to one of the named park positions, double click this script:

ParkToNamedParkPosition.vbscript

The script will search the "Documents\ApParkPositions" folder for files with
".Park" extension and create an option list for you to select from. To park to
a location select the appropriate number in the list that is presented.

While slewing to the park position, a popup window will show up for two seconds
at a time showing the current position of the scope. If you click the Cancel button
the slew will stop. If you let the slew complete the popup window will stop appearing
and a final popup message will show for about 5 seconds indicating the mount has
been parked.

If you have any questions or problems with the scripts, please post them here and not
to my private email (thanks!)

I am offering these scripts to the community under the open source MIT license, which
means you are free to do whatever you want with them. However, as is typical in software
licenses there is no implied warranty and by using these scripts or modifications of

Best regards,

-Ray Gralak
Author of APCC (Astro-Physics Command Center): http://www.astro-physics.com/index.htm?products/accessories/software/apcc/apcc
Author of PEMPro V3: https://www.ccdware.com
Author of Astro-Physics V2 ASCOM Driver: https://www.siriusimaging.com/apdriver


Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: VbScript for Named Park Positions

Christopher Erickson
 

AVG only says that it is an "unknown program", not a virus.
 
It will let you install it anyway (Yes, it is safe. Driver does NOT have a virus.) If you read the messages carefully and follow the AVG instructions. At some point you will have to click on the "More Info" link in the warning message.
 
If you have a different anti-virus program, it might be doing something very similar.
 
AVG misfires on the ASCOM platform and many of my imaging processing programs too.
 
 
-Christopher Erickson
Observatory engineer
Summit Kinetics
Waikoloa, HI 96738
www.summitkinetics.com
 



From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...]
Sent: Saturday, September 29, 2018 9:30 AM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] VbScript for Named Park Positions

Ray, 

A different question.  I am trying to download the  latest ap v2  ascom driver version and my windows 10 computer is telling me the exe file has a virus and deletes it.  Is there a virus.  Can you suggest how I should proceed to get the v2 driver?  Thanks,

Geoff Cook

On Sep 16, 2018, at 1:15 PM, 'Ray Gralak (Groups)' groups3@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:

 

Hi everyone,

This folder contains scripts to create and park to new park positions.

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/ap-gto/files/VbScript%20Make%20New%20Park%20Positions/

NOTE: To use the VB scripts in this folder you MUST have a GTOCP4 or
a GTOCP3 with Rev "S" firmware or later.

This folder contains two VbScript files, one to create a new "named" park position,
and the other to execute a park operation to a previously created park position. The
new park position can be below the horizon, and/or with counterweight up, neither of
which the current version of APCC will let you do.

The scripts have a ".txt" file extension so that you can download them without being
deemed a virus threat by anti-virus utilities. To use these scripts download them
to your computer's desktop or another convenient location. After that, remove the ".txt"
file extension by renaming each file. If Windows or your AV utility won't let you execute
them, you may have to right click each file, select "Properties", and click the "Unblock"
button, if there is one.

IMPORTANT NOTE: to create a new named park position, you must be able to connect
to your mount via the AP V2 driver, with or without APCC.

So, to create a new named position double click the VbScript file:

CreateNamedMountParkPosition.vbs

You will be prompted for a descriptive name for the new park position. Although
the names can have spaces, do not use any characters that are illegal in a file
name or the script will fail. The script will give you a chance to this file to
slew to the desired park position, if the scope is not already positioned there.

Before saving to disk the script will display the parameters and the name of the
file it will save them in. You can confirm or cancel at that time.

If confirmed a new file will be saved in the folder "ApParkPositions" in your
Windows Documents folder. This folder will be automatically created if it does
not exist. If you ever want to remove any park positions just delete the
appropriate file in the folder. If you don't qwant to delete the file but not
have it included as a park position, then change the file extension from ".Park"
to something else.

To later park to one of the named park positions, double click this script:

ParkToNamedParkPosition.vbscript

The script will search the "Documents\ApParkPositions" folder for files with
".Park" extension and create an option list for you to select from. To park to
a location select the appropriate number in the list that is presented.

While slewing to the park position, a popup window will show up for two seconds
at a time showing the current position of the scope. If you click the Cancel button
the slew will stop. If you let the slew complete the popup window will stop appearing
and a final popup message will show for about 5 seconds indicating the mount has
been parked.

If you have any questions or problems with the scripts, please post them here and not
to my private email (thanks!)

I am offering these scripts to the community under the open source MIT license, which
means you are free to do whatever you want with them. However, as is typical in software
licenses there is no implied warranty and by using these scripts or modifications of

Best regards,

-Ray Gralak
Author of APCC (Astro-Physics Command Center): http://www.astro-physics.com/index.htm?products/accessories/software/apcc/apcc
Author of PEMPro V3: https://www.ccdware.com
Author of Astro-Physics V2 ASCOM Driver: https://www.siriusimaging.com/apdriver


Virus-free. www.avg.com