Date   

Re: AP900 CP4 with ASIAIR - need some guidance

 

Nice work Dan

I have no idea how you figured out that workaround :)

On Wed, Jun 15, 2022 at 4:19 AM Dan_Paris <danysra@...> wrote:
Thanks Kevin for the tips.


I found a trick to get successful guiding calibration. I first set guide rate to 0.5x with the keypad, then calibrate with the ASIAIR, set back the guide rate to 1x and calibrate again. A bit convoluted bit it works!




locked Re: Our blinding blaring world

fernandorivera3
 

On those VERY RARE OCCASIONS when my vacation time from work, clear transparent skies & New Moon week actually coincide- I travel to either of 2 favorite dark sky sites of mine, both here in Texas. Unfortunately for either place it is 7 hours or 11 hours on the road EACH WAY (not round trip) 😳
Absolutely no way would I do serious deep sky viewing from my DOWNTOWN location! The LED billboards, gas station convenience stores, strip malls etc light pollution at night is so EGREGIOUS that it is probably seen easily from the International Space Station during its orbit. Shielded light fixtures are not in place anywhere for perhaps hundreds of miles in ANY DIRECTION 😡

Fernando


Re: AP900 CP4 with ASIAIR - need some guidance

Dan_Paris
 

Thanks Kevin for the tips.


I found a trick to get successful guiding calibration. I first set guide rate to 0.5x with the keypad, then calibrate with the ASIAIR, set back the guide rate to 1x and calibrate again. A bit convoluted bit it works!


locked Re: Our blinding blaring world

Christopher Erickson
 

One persuasive angle might be focusing on the profound waste of valuable energy every night, blasting billions of watts of energy up and away into the night sky, where it benefits nothing and no one.

-Christopher Erickson
Observatory engineer
Waikoloa, HI 96738
www.summitkinetics.com
   

On Tue, Jun 14, 2022, 4:14 PM Sébastien Doré <sebastiendore1@...> wrote:

On a more positive note, there are some good initiatives around the globe from simple people asking mayors of their locality to promote dark skies special events in which they shutdown (almost) all public lighting downtown for several hours on a predetermined night.

All citizens are invited to get together to benefit from the incredible views they have access to right above their home town / backyard on that very special night. It’s also a good opportunity to shot some great urban wide field photos featuring the wonders above and of course it is perfect time to educate people about light pollution, its harmful effects on astronomy/human life/wildlife and how they can mitigate it with careful lighting planning/usage.

Those are isolated initiatives for the most part I think (but getting more and more popular especially in some regions of Europe) and so imagine if every big city/state would have one of those on the same night... or, let’s dream for an entire week (like the annual international dark sky week:  https://idsw.darksky.org/ ) or during the NEAF/AIC weekends, etc. Darkness for hundreds of kilometers around available to everybody for a few hours on a well chosen cloudless, Moonless night...🤩

I bet you it would make those who have never seen a truly dark sky realize what they are missing and help our cause somehow... 

I’m thinking, any AstroNuts ready to jump in and ask their mayor for such a coordinated event ?

Sébastien 


locked Re: Our blinding blaring world

Sébastien Doré
 


On a more positive note, there are some good initiatives around the globe from simple people asking mayors of their locality to promote dark skies special events in which they shutdown (almost) all public lighting downtown for several hours on a predetermined night.

All citizens are invited to get together to benefit from the incredible views they have access to right above their home town / backyard on that very special night. It’s also a good opportunity to shot some great urban wide field photos featuring the wonders above and of course it is perfect time to educate people about light pollution, its harmful effects on astronomy/human life/wildlife and how they can mitigate it with careful lighting planning/usage.

Those are isolated initiatives for the most part I think (but getting more and more popular especially in some regions of Europe) and so imagine if every big city/state would have one of those on the same night... or, let’s dream for an entire week (like the annual international dark sky week:  https://idsw.darksky.org/ ) or during the NEAF/AIC weekends, etc. Darkness for hundreds of kilometers around available to everybody for a few hours on a well chosen cloudless, Moonless night...🤩

I bet you it would make those who have never seen a truly dark sky realize what they are missing and help our cause somehow... 

I’m thinking, any AstroNuts ready to jump in and ask their mayor for such a coordinated event ?

Sébastien 


locked Re: Our blinding blaring world

thefamily90 Phillips
 

I am lucky in that our beach house is located close enough to the ocean that if you look towards England there’s not a whole lot of light pollution in that direction. Bortle 4. If you turn around and look toward the city lights are blazing away.

Jim

From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> on behalf of M Hambrick <mhambrick563@...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 14, 2022 7:39:17 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Our blinding blaring world
 
Of all the things that can be advocated, the one with the highest probability of success would be to try to encourage communities to use shielded light fixtures. This might not reverse the damage that has already been done, but it might be able to stop it from getting worse.

A good example of this is Wimberley Texas. The Texas Hill Country is famous for having some very dark skies, and that is still true in some areas. Wimberley is a wonderful town to visit, and as you drive into town you will see signs posted on the roads claiming that Wimberley is recognized by the International Dark Sky Association as being very dark sky friendly. The city has enacted some pretty strict measures to minimize or reduce light pollution, but it may be too little, too late in their case. If you look at a Bortle map of this part of the state. Wimberley is barely better than a suburban location. 

Now, Roland's and Marj's vacation home in Hawaii (in the upper left quadrant in the bottom screen shot), They have still got some pretty dark skies.  

Mike




locked Re: Our blinding blaring world

M Hambrick
 

Of all the things that can be advocated, the one with the highest probability of success would be to try to encourage communities to use shielded light fixtures. This might not reverse the damage that has already been done, but it might be able to stop it from getting worse.

A good example of this is Wimberley Texas. The Texas Hill Country is famous for having some very dark skies, and that is still true in some areas. Wimberley is a wonderful town to visit, and as you drive into town you will see signs posted on the roads claiming that Wimberley is recognized by the International Dark Sky Association as being very dark sky friendly. The city has enacted some pretty strict measures to minimize or reduce light pollution, but it may be too little, too late in their case. If you look at a Bortle map of this part of the state. Wimberley is barely better than a suburban location. 

Now, Roland's and Marj's vacation home in Hawaii (in the upper left quadrant in the bottom screen shot), They have still got some pretty dark skies.  

Mike




Re: Frankenscope Stage I

Howard Ritter
 

Thanks, Howard. Several have made this suggestion, and I’m going to implement it as well as bring the camera and the external CPO4 control box indoors when indicated.

—howard

On Jun 14, 2022, at 12:42 PM, Howard Hedlund <howard@...> wrote:

Very Pretty! 

When you get the Franken-baby set up outside, be sure to set up a way to mitigate moisture under the Telegizmos.  Some environments can lead to excessive moisture from dew being unable to dry our under the covers without help.  We have seen this cause all sorts of problems, and not just to our equipment.  Even a small incandescent light bulb underneath can provide enough warmth.


Re: Frankenscope Stage I

Howard Hedlund
 

Very Pretty! 

When you get the Franken-baby set up outside, be sure to set up a way to mitigate moisture under the Telegizmos.  Some environments can lead to excessive moisture from dew being unable to dry our under the covers without help.  We have seen this cause all sorts of problems, and not just to our equipment.  Even a small incandescent light bulb underneath can provide enough warmth.


locked Re: Our blinding blaring world

Frank Widmann
 

One useful tool in combating light pollution is the concept of light trespass. The county I live in has a requirement that all lights be shielded to prevent intrusion beyond the property line. Why should somebody else’s questionable taste and silly phobias be allowed to interfere with my enjoyment of my property? If there is one thing even light polluters can understand, it is property rights. 

Frank

On Jun 14, 2022, at 6:18 AM, ap@... wrote:

On Tue, Jun 14, 2022 at 07:17 AM, Jim H wrote:
Here are a few thoughts on how to help reduce lighting.
The problem (or maybe I should say my frustration with) many of these is that they rely on advocacy, and at least here in Florida the public generally WANTS daylight at midnight, and elected officials in both government and perhaps worse home owners groups go along, so it just gets brighter and brighter.

Are there laws and regulations on the books that one can use?  Something with actual teeth, to say "you do not comply with X.Y.Z and must change or you may be fined"?  Something to stop the (fed? state?) from continuing to light huge swaths of the everglades by lighting miles of Alligator Alley with street lights? 

I applaud public outreach and advocacy, don't get me wrong. But the up-lighting, grotesquely bright street lights in front of my house are not going away unless there is actually a law against it -- too many old farts who otherwise can't venture outside after dusk, claiming it is a "safety" issue to which the HOA rushes to install ever more and brighter lights.

And really -- who needs lights on an interstate in the middle of the literal Everglades swamp?  I'm still surprised those are legal, this is the same area building miles of animal tunnels and other accommodations to protect wildlife, but blinding anything flying or moving at night. 

We need lawyers, sadly.

Linwood


locked Re: Our blinding blaring world

ap@CaptivePhotons.com
 

On Tue, Jun 14, 2022 at 10:16 AM, Thomas Swann wrote:
Species:  Astronomer
Status:  Endangered

We just need to declare that we are fish.   (Just google "California court rules a bumble bee is a fish", as you can't make this stuff up to be more strange than reality). 


locked Re: Our blinding blaring world

Thomas Swann
 

Species:  Astronomer
Status:  Endangered

On 6/14/2022 1:35 PM, Emilio J. Robau, P.E. wrote:

We need a listed species besides the sea turtle that does not like light.  If we could find one, the that would turn the tide.



locked Re: Our blinding blaring world

Emilio J. Robau, P.E.
 

We need a listed species besides the sea turtle that does not like light.  If we could find one, the that would turn the tide.


locked Re: Our blinding blaring world

ap@CaptivePhotons.com
 

On Tue, Jun 14, 2022 at 07:17 AM, Jim H wrote:
Here are a few thoughts on how to help reduce lighting.
The problem (or maybe I should say my frustration with) many of these is that they rely on advocacy, and at least here in Florida the public generally WANTS daylight at midnight, and elected officials in both government and perhaps worse home owners groups go along, so it just gets brighter and brighter.

Are there laws and regulations on the books that one can use?  Something with actual teeth, to say "you do not comply with X.Y.Z and must change or you may be fined"?  Something to stop the (fed? state?) from continuing to light huge swaths of the everglades by lighting miles of Alligator Alley with street lights? 

I applaud public outreach and advocacy, don't get me wrong. But the up-lighting, grotesquely bright street lights in front of my house are not going away unless there is actually a law against it -- too many old farts who otherwise can't venture outside after dusk, claiming it is a "safety" issue to which the HOA rushes to install ever more and brighter lights.

And really -- who needs lights on an interstate in the middle of the literal Everglades swamp?  I'm still surprised those are legal, this is the same area building miles of animal tunnels and other accommodations to protect wildlife, but blinding anything flying or moving at night. 

We need lawyers, sadly.

Linwood


Re: Mach 2 basic operation

midmoastro
 

Yes, I can echo Brian, I have connected this way, so it does work.
Todd


locked Re: Our blinding blaring world

Jim H
 

Here are a few thoughts on how to help reduce lighting.



Anyone know of others?

Thanks

Jim

On Mon, Jun 13, 2022 at 8:32 PM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

he big thing is outdoor lighting.  Install up lights on all the trees for dramatic effect.  When I walk around the neighborhood at night and no one's around to see the dramatic landscapes because they're all inside watching TV!
I have to laugh, but you're absolutely right. Nobody is out these days for an evening stroll. We used to walk at night in our neighborhood which has no street lights. It was easy to see where we were going because out eyes got dark adapted. But then the association promoted porch lights to be on, ostensibly for safety reasons. So now there are lots of glaring lights which doesn't help to see the roadway. And lots of shadows behind the bushes on the lawns. Now nobody walks the streets in our neighborhood. And of course there is a bright orange sky glow thanks to the huge stripmalls about a mile away. No Milky Way and only a few bright stars.

Roland


-----Original Message-----
From: Joseph Beyer <jcbeyer2001@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Mon, Jun 13, 2022 10:05 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Our blinding blaring world

It's really disheartening.  I clearly remember climbing on my parent's roof in west Denver in the late 60s to take " star pictures" with my Brownie reflex camera.  I took most of them in the winter when Orion came up over the house.  It was so amazing.  I'd develop the film and print the pictures myself.  Of course there were star trails but they looked great to my 8 year old eyes!  We lived on the far west edge of Denver and our subdivision extended 4 blocks further west.  After that...nothing but undeveloped foothills and mountains.  It was dark.  I stopped visiting and haven't been back in more than ten years because places I grew in are completely replaced by suburban sprawl that's continuous up and down the entire front range.  I'm sure the story of "progress" is the same for most people.  I just laugh when I hear the people say they are passionate about the environment.  

Now I'm living in Northern California fairly close to the coast.  The sky is still reasonably dark over the ocean but getting more light polluted all the time.  I wish we had the same restriction that Frank described but the town I live in made negotiations with the water company that placed a water pipeline from the Sierras to the coast - we'll give you the land for the pipeline if you guarantee us water in perpetuity - deal.  The town will never face water restrictions because of the deal.  Insane.  As a result there's construction everywhere it's possible to squeeze a residence.  The big thing is outdoor lighting.  Install up lights on all the trees for dramatic effect.  When I walk around the neighborhood at night and no one's around to see the dramatic landscapes because they're all inside watching TV!  Humans seem to be innately bothered by the absence of light.

I once read a story about the Northridge earthquake in Southern California.  The quake was so powerful that it substantially disrupted electricity grid and made large areas completely dark. People actually thought the earthquake had effected the night sky because it was so bright.  Go figure.  

 

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


locked Re: Our blinding blaring world

Roland Christen
 


he big thing is outdoor lighting.  Install up lights on all the trees for dramatic effect.  When I walk around the neighborhood at night and no one's around to see the dramatic landscapes because they're all inside watching TV!
I have to laugh, but you're absolutely right. Nobody is out these days for an evening stroll. We used to walk at night in our neighborhood which has no street lights. It was easy to see where we were going because out eyes got dark adapted. But then the association promoted porch lights to be on, ostensibly for safety reasons. So now there are lots of glaring lights which doesn't help to see the roadway. And lots of shadows behind the bushes on the lawns. Now nobody walks the streets in our neighborhood. And of course there is a bright orange sky glow thanks to the huge stripmalls about a mile away. No Milky Way and only a few bright stars.

Roland


-----Original Message-----
From: Joseph Beyer <jcbeyer2001@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Mon, Jun 13, 2022 10:05 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Our blinding blaring world

It's really disheartening.  I clearly remember climbing on my parent's roof in west Denver in the late 60s to take " star pictures" with my Brownie reflex camera.  I took most of them in the winter when Orion came up over the house.  It was so amazing.  I'd develop the film and print the pictures myself.  Of course there were star trails but they looked great to my 8 year old eyes!  We lived on the far west edge of Denver and our subdivision extended 4 blocks further west.  After that...nothing but undeveloped foothills and mountains.  It was dark.  I stopped visiting and haven't been back in more than ten years because places I grew in are completely replaced by suburban sprawl that's continuous up and down the entire front range.  I'm sure the story of "progress" is the same for most people.  I just laugh when I hear the people say they are passionate about the environment.  

Now I'm living in Northern California fairly close to the coast.  The sky is still reasonably dark over the ocean but getting more light polluted all the time.  I wish we had the same restriction that Frank described but the town I live in made negotiations with the water company that placed a water pipeline from the Sierras to the coast - we'll give you the land for the pipeline if you guarantee us water in perpetuity - deal.  The town will never face water restrictions because of the deal.  Insane.  As a result there's construction everywhere it's possible to squeeze a residence.  The big thing is outdoor lighting.  Install up lights on all the trees for dramatic effect.  When I walk around the neighborhood at night and no one's around to see the dramatic landscapes because they're all inside watching TV!  Humans seem to be innately bothered by the absence of light.

I once read a story about the Northridge earthquake in Southern California.  The quake was so powerful that it substantially disrupted electricity grid and made large areas completely dark. People actually thought the earthquake had effected the night sky because it was so bright.  Go figure.  

 

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


locked Re: Our blinding blaring world

Joseph Beyer
 

It's really disheartening.  I clearly remember climbing on my parent's roof in west Denver in the late 60s to take " star pictures" with my Brownie reflex camera.  I took most of them in the winter when Orion came up over the house.  It was so amazing.  I'd develop the film and print the pictures myself.  Of course there were star trails but they looked great to my 8 year old eyes!  We lived on the far west edge of Denver and our subdivision extended 4 blocks further west.  After that...nothing but undeveloped foothills and mountains.  It was dark.  I stopped visiting and haven't been back in more than ten years because places I grew in are completely replaced by suburban sprawl that's continuous up and down the entire front range.  I'm sure the story of "progress" is the same for most people.  I just laugh when I hear the people say they are passionate about the environment.  

Now I'm living in Northern California fairly close to the coast.  The sky is still reasonably dark over the ocean but getting more light polluted all the time.  I wish we had the same restriction that Frank described but the town I live in made negotiations with the water company that placed a water pipeline from the Sierras to the coast - we'll give you the land for the pipeline if you guarantee us water in perpetuity - deal.  The town will never face water restrictions because of the deal.  Insane.  As a result there's construction everywhere it's possible to squeeze a residence.  The big thing is outdoor lighting.  Install up lights on all the trees for dramatic effect.  When I walk around the neighborhood at night and no one's around to see the dramatic landscapes because they're all inside watching TV!  Humans seem to be innately bothered by the absence of light.

I once read a story about the Northridge earthquake in Southern California.  The quake was so powerful that it substantially disrupted electricity grid and made large areas completely dark. People actually thought the earthquake had effected the night sky because it was so bright.  Go figure.  

 


Re: [ap-ug] Our blinding blaring world

Pete Lardizabal
 

In the early 1960s I remember being frustrated as kid trying to find the constellations in the South Florida skies… TOO MANY STARS! The Milky Way was an amazing “blanket of light”. 

Here in St Johns, Florida I can still make out the Milky Way; however, land developers are busy with home construction and it is only a matter of time until that “blanket of light” is lost. 

☹️

Pete

On Jun 13, 2022, at 2:46 PM, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:


Light and sound pollution has accelerated this century. At some point most people will not know that there are stars in the sky
Rolando

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2022/07/light-noise-pollution-animal-sensory-impact/638446/?utm_medium=cr&utm_source=email&utm_campaign=july/august_coverstory_actives2022&utm_term=ALL%20Active%20Subscribers%20%28Stripe%2BCDS%2BiTunes%29

Exerpt:

In 2001, the astronomer Pierantonio Cinzano and his colleagues created the first global atlas of light pollution. They calculated that two-thirds of the world’s population lived in light-polluted areas, where the nights were at least 10 percent brighter than natural darkness. About 40 percent of humankind is permanently bathed in the equivalent of perpetual moonlight, and about 25 percent constantly experiences an artificial twilight that exceeds the illumination of a full moon. “‘Night’ never really comes for them,” the researchers wrote. In 2016, when the team updated the atlas, it found that the problem had become even worse. By then, about 83 percent of people—including more than 99 percent of Americans and Europeans—were under light-polluted skies. More than a third of humanity, and almost 80 percent of North Americans, can no longer see the Milky Way. “The thought of light traveling billions of years from distant galaxies only to be washed out in the last billionth of a second by the glow from the nearest strip mall depresses me to no end,” the visual ecologist Sönke Johnsen once wrote.


locked Re: Our blinding blaring world

Frank Widmann
 

I live on the coast half way between LA and the Bay area. The sky is fairly dark particularly out toward the ocean. We are blessed with a perpetual water shortage that has stopped all new development. People who have lived here for a while recognize the connection between the night sky and the beautiful environment. However, there are people who come here because they love the natural beauty, but they bring all the bad habits that destroyed the place they came from from. They are always the ones you see on social media asking how to kill native plants, animals and insects. They are true suburbanites. We have a strong community outreach that raises environmental awareness. I host and participate in astronomy events and post astro images with detailed explanations on local media sites. I’ve seen it turn around people’s thinking. I don’t harp on it, but I regularly point out that streetlights are an atrocity that don’t serve a useful purpose anywhere. They are the creation of utility providers who are trying to balance their generation load and maximize return on investment. They sell street lighting to suckers just like every other crap product. We are raising the carbon dioxide content in the atmosphere to unprecedented levels but stupidly persist in creating light pollution. Street lighting and municipal lighting create a pervasive eyesore that reduces resistance to other forms of light pollution to a so what. It’s past time to turn the streetlights everywhere.

Frank

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