Date   

Re: Does NINA auto meridian flip with APCC

Rouz
 

This is what that odd flip looked like:

Seems to be ok after the restart and whatever I did.


Re: Does NINA auto meridian flip with APCC

Rouz
 

Might have been a bug somewhere?
Once it flipped but only the Dec motor flipped the RA didn't move and the OTA was pointing at the floor!

But seems to work now
restarted the PC
AP V2 driver  autoconfig is ON
Meriden pier tracking limits points made  (The yellow curve)
Enable Meridian tracking limits = on
Action = Stop tracking
Limit to meridian = on
Nina delays = 0
Telescope side = on


Re: Heavy piggyback considerations

weems@...
 

It would depend on the rings. Thickness, machining, hinge and clamp design, materials, etc.  My 6”f9 has the original AP two-piece hexagonal rings, which are very rigid. I have Parallax rings on another 6”, and they are decent. Then I also have some Orion rings that I would never trust to hold anything valuable. Try mounting the piggyback scope on the rings without the TMB in them, and see how much flexure there is. That will give you a sense of how much the OTA is contributing to the structure.

I prefer a tandem arrangement.  The AP tandem bar is very stiff, especially if you use one of the longer AP saddles that will support most of its length. 

Chip


Re: Does NINA auto meridian flip with APCC

Rouz
 

On Wed, Nov 17, 2021 at 07:32 PM, ap@... wrote:

Set up this way what happens is this:

 

  • As you approach meridian, it looks to see before each exposure if you have time for another image before 1 minute before, so if you are doing 3 minute images and pausing 1 minute before, it may stop anywhere from 1 minute to 4 minutes before meridian.  NINA stops tracking (APCC just sits there)
  • Time passes until 1 minute after transit
  • Now NINA sends a slew (and I think a set pierside), APCC now knows the target is on the other side of the meridian, and flips the mount.
  • NINA (if set) recenters, focuses (if set), starts guiding (if set) and starts the sequence going again.

 

But that's the simple approach, and (using the 3 minute exposures) I waste 2-5 minutes per night.  Such a travesty.  😊  

Thanks Linwood,

That used to work a few weeks ago, I'm not sure if it was an update or something I did.

I issue I suspect is that Nina says meridian in say 1 minute, but APCCs number is 16 minutes. 

So when the command is sent it still sees it has 16 minutes to go.

Ill try setting Nina to 20 minutes past meridian and try again now.

Rouz



Re: Does NINA auto meridian flip with APCC

Rouz
 

Dale,

I wasn't sure this is to do with NINA or APCC settings.

Ill try with everything set to default with pier side on, thanks.

I'll continue on Discord then?


Re: Does NINA auto meridian flip with APCC

ap@CaptivePhotons.com
 

Rouz wrote:

 

  • I have, no responses yet.
    Not sure if its a Nina setting or something in APCC.

 

It's almost certainly the combination.  I didn't notice your posting there (and may not be the one to help regardless) but a couple thoughts.

 

First, make sure to provide nina logs on discord for the flip (and preferably an approximate time it was due).

 

Secondly, it is useful to state clearly how you are trying to do the flip.  To me there are two basic approaches - trying to use Counterweight Up limits to eek a another exposure out of the system before the flip (or even many more), and trying to flip AT the meridian.


To me the latter is much simpler, but is not what most people (including the NINA Developers) recommend.  By setting limits to track past meridian, and having a range of times, you spend less time waiting.  But to me it is more complicated, and a lot more opportunity for it to screw up if not coordinated carefully with settings on both sides. 

 

There is also a "smart" meridian flip plugin which is more interesting, as it uses a safe zone around your mount to know how far it can image past meridian (or even before) that varies by DEC.

 

So… for anyone trying to help, it is important to say what approach you took.

 

In my case I have it working very reliably as follows:

 

  • APCC is set to stop (not flip) at the meridian, no tracking past, no counterweight up.  It is important that it NOT allow you to slew counterweight up for this to work.
  • NINA is set to pause 1 minute before meridian, and wait until 1 minute after (both after and max after are 1 minute).
  • I am careful to make sure I do a plate solve and sync (which APCC sees as a recal) so that NINA and APCC both know the time of transit (you should compare once you have centered and start tracking, it's on the meridian page of APCC and the telescope pane in NINA, they should match within a few seconds).
  • Obviously you have to tell NINA that you want it to flip, either the meridian flip trigger for the advanced sequencer or the setting if using the basic sequencer.

 

Set up this way what happens is this:

 

  • As you approach meridian, it looks to see before each exposure if you have time for another image before 1 minute before, so if you are doing 3 minute images and pausing 1 minute before, it may stop anywhere from 1 minute to 4 minutes before meridian.  NINA stops tracking (APCC just sits there)
  • Time passes until 1 minute after transit
  • Now NINA sends a slew (and I think a set pierside), APCC now knows the target is on the other side of the meridian, and flips the mount.
  • NINA (if set) recenters, focuses (if set), starts guiding (if set) and starts the sequence going again.

 

But that's the simple approach, and (using the 3 minute exposures) I waste 2-5 minutes per night.  Such a travesty.  😊  

 

But it flips.


Linwood

 


Re: Does NINA auto meridian flip with APCC

Dale Ghent
 

You asked there 10 minutes before posting here, Rouz. I might be at my computer a lot, but I do sometimes step away for a few minutes :D

 

Yes, you need to have Use Telescope Side of Pier turned on in NINA’s meridian flip settings, which is the default for that setting. This option exists because some telescope drivers lie about their pointing state, but the A-P driver does not. With that off, the flip won’t happen if you also have a delay set in the A-P driver or APCC as the coordinates will still be within the post-meridian delay zone. NINA will think that the telescope is flipping, but the telescope thinks it has more counterweight-up runway and keeps on going. This is why managing the flip via the side of pier property is important in this case as there is no way for any app to know about any delays that are configured in or enforced by the driver.

 

 

From: Rouz
Sent: Wednesday, November 17, 2021 10:10 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Does NINA auto meridian flip with APCC

 

I have, no responses yet.

Not sure if its a Nina setting or something in APCC.

 


Re: New JPL Format for Horizons Ephemeris #APCC - Format Causes Issue #APCC

fd@...
 
Edited

I am having the same problem.
I get the same error message "Apparent Alt/Elevation not found in ephemeris data".

The data IS there:

*****************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
 Date__(UT)__HR:MN     R.A._____(ICRF)_____DEC  R.A.__(a-apparent)__DEC  dRA*cosD d(DEC)/dt  Azi____(a-app)___Elev  L_Ap_Sid_Time    APmag   S-brt             delta      deldot     S-O-T /r     S-T-O  Sky_motion  Sky_mot_PA  RelVel-ANG  Lun_Sky_Brt  sky_SNR
*****************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
$$SOE
 2021-Nov-18 00:00 Cm  02 37 26.16 +12 30 48.6  02 38 37.76 +12 36 30.4  1720.045  820.0817   77.457834   5.983739  20 15 15.9215  -12.254   3.718  0.00269079633233  -0.2631059  165.1214 /T   14.8384   31.759023   64.509161   -14.28441         n.a.     n.a.
 2021-Nov-18 00:04 Cm  02 37 33.96 +12 31 43.5  02 38 45.57 +12 37 25.0  1711.117  820.3118   78.179302   6.602058  2
I noticed that the current header says "Azi____(a-app)___Elev"

but an old ephemerides (from 2020-11-10) uses the header "Azi_(a-appr)_Elev"

Maybe that throws HORIZONS off?

Any idea of when a new version of Horizons will be out (or ready for testing)?

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

EDIT - I made it work

  • I downloaded the data from JPL. 
  • As Ray mentioned, could not CTRL-A,CTRL-C. I had to manually select and copy the ephemerides data to the clipboard.
  • I pasted the data from the clipboard into Notepad++. (Notepad also works)
  • Then on line 69 of the file I replaced "Azi____(a-app)___Elev" with "Azi_(a-appr)_Elev"  (ignore the quotes).
  • Then I saved the .txt file.
  • Horizons could read the .txt file with no errors.
  • I saved the file in Horizons, to give it the default .eph extension.
  • Success!



--
Mach1GTO and GTOCP4 on permanent pier


Re: Does NINA auto meridian flip with APCC

Rouz
 

I have, no responses yet.

Not sure if its a Nina setting or something in APCC.


Re: Does NINA auto meridian flip with APCC

Bill Long
 

You should probably ask them on Discord.


From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> on behalf of Rouz <rbidshahri@...>
Sent: Wednesday, November 17, 2021 7:05 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>
Subject: [ap-gto] Does NINA auto meridian flip with APCC
 
Hi All,

Anyone know why the auto flip stopped working?

I remember it used to work fine in the past but it doesn't now no matter what combination I use.

Is there a key setting that needs to be ticked or unticked?

Enable Meridian Tracking Limits = Stop tracking.    I want it to stop in case it doesn't flip and I'm asleep.




Does NINA auto meridian flip with APCC

Rouz
 

Hi All,

Anyone know why the auto flip stopped working?

I remember it used to work fine in the past but it doesn't now no matter what combination I use.

Is there a key setting that needs to be ticked or unticked?

Enable Meridian Tracking Limits = Stop tracking.    I want it to stop in case it doesn't flip and I'm asleep.




moderated Re: APPM ASCOM Camera Broken

Bill Long
 

Hey that seemed to work. Fog rolled in and killed my night but the ASCOM camera connection did work. Thanks!


From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> on behalf of Ray Gralak <iogroups@...>
Sent: Tuesday, November 16, 2021 7:07 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] APPM ASCOM Camera Broken
 
Hi Bill,

I believe there was a fix in one of the recent betas. Here's a link to the latest beta in case you would like to try it:

https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.apastrosoftware.com%2Fapcc_download%2FAPCC_Pro_BETA_Setup_1.9.2.1.exe&amp;data=04%7C01%7C%7Ca3913ff9c5c1465b6e0c08d9a9787d43%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637727157229948378%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000&amp;sdata=7aE1gieLocz%2FAgyWonSHwY97baL%2Fbu2bpMeiv4YIzIQ%3D&amp;reserved=0

-Ray

> -----Original Message-----
> From: main@ap-gto.groups.io [mailto:main@ap-gto.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill Long
> Sent: Tuesday, November 16, 2021 6:39 PM
> To: AP-GTO Groups.io
> Subject: [ap-gto] APPM ASCOM Camera Broken
>
> I have never been able to get ASCOM Camera to work. I get arcane dialogs like this one:
>
>
>
>







Re: New JPL Format for Horizons Ephemeris #APCC - Format Causes Issue #APCC

Michael 'Mikey' Mangieri
 

Any word on the upcoming update to APCC to correct this?  I am setting up to capture C/2021 A1 (Leonard) and it is a fast moving comet.


Re: APPM Model sanity check (suggestion)

Dale Ghent
 

On Nov 16, 2021, at 20:25, W Hilmo <y.groups@...> wrote:

Thanks! That is helpful.

I notice that the version that I'm running does not have the Dec Arc tab in the properties for the plug-in. The plug-in version number that I have is 1.3.5.0.

What version do I need, and do I need to do anything to get it other than download a nightly build that has it?
This dec arc code isn't released yet. APCC's current beta introduces a new REST API for controlling how APPM is configured, so I've spent the past day or so converting the plugin over to it. Prior to this API, the instruction would generate a configuration file of parameters and launch APPM with an argument that told it to use that file. Better testing can be done once some loose ends with this API are addressed.

Speaking of testing, it looks like weather and prior obligations will lock me out of testing this under actual sky until later next week. We're getting our first winter storm on Monday or Tuesday, and I won't be available on the only clear-ish night between now and then. My remote setup plans can't happen soon enough (and those are still roughly a year out from coming to fruition.)


Re: Tripod mounting of 1600GTO

Tom Blahovici
 

Take a look at the AP 1612FSA Flat Surface Adapter and you will see why.


Re: 130 EDFS

Karen Christen
 

Thanks for sharing, Kevin.  We’re really happy you’re enjoying your new scope!

 

“Nerded out on this one…”  😆

Karen

AP

 

From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of KHursh via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, November 16, 2021 10:57 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: [ap-gto] 130 EDFS

 

[Edited Message Follows]

And now for something completely different...

My acquisition computer didn't like the over 90% humidity we've had lately and we have some partly cloudy skies on top of the nearly full moon, so I decided to give my new-to-me 130 some visual only time. I had Sky Safari driving the CP5 and it was working fine.

Caveat: I don't have a huge selection of eyepieces, so this is pretty limited. I was working with a 25mm Televue plossl and a 8mm Radian as well as a Barlow.

According to Astrospheric, Seeing is average. Being directly under the jet stream here in Northern California, expectations are always low, especially as we head toward winter. 

Luna: I kept the moon at 34x, but she was lovely. Just the barest edge of the eastern edge was in shadow but it was super crisp. I am not very experienced with lunar observation, but the view was great.

Almach: Gamma Andromeda is a lovely double star system very similar to Albireo with a large bright yellow star paired with a smaller blue star. The color contrast is beautiful with the blue member to the upper right of the yellow star. This is not all that difficult to split and was easy at 100x.

Zeta Aquarii: This was a slightly more challenging target. I could see a peanut at 100x, but you drive a truck through the pair at 200x. Seeing was steadying quite a bit because I could clearly see the first diffraction rings around each star and they weren't bouncing around much. The two members appeared in a N-S orientation with each other.

Now here's where it gets surprising.

Epsilon Arietis: Yes I managed to split this tight pair. They are listed at 1.3" separation and was able to cleanly split the pair. I was not expecting this.

Jupiter: With only 5" of aperture, there isn't a whole lot of detail one can see. The Galilean moons were not quite disks as they would be in 10+" scopes. Equatorial banding was easily seen with moments of detail showing in the clouds. A little patience paid off and I could sense just a little bit of festooning. The red spot was not visible.

Uranus: A little gem. Clearly blue disk visible at 200x. My first time seeing it visually. Nerded out on this one.

I finished with the double-double. Epsilon Lyrae is not a challenged for the scope, but I can't resist looking when it is visible. At 200x, there was plenty of daylight there on both pairs.

This is a fantastic telescope. The thermal stability really beats the tar out of my Esprit 120. That is where it truly exceeds the Sky-Watcher. Of course it is better in other ways, but its a little more subtle. The thermal stability is NOT subtle.

Thanks Roland. I don't if you were ever thanked 20+ years ago when this was first made, but let me make amends for that. This is such a fine instrument. I couldn't be happier with it.

Kevin


--
Karen Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: 130 EDFS

Roland Christen
 

Glad you're enjoying the scope.

Roland

-----Original Message-----
From: KHursh via groups.io <khursh@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Tue, Nov 16, 2021 10:57 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] 130 EDFS

And now for something completely different...

My acquisition computer didn't like the over 90% humidity we've had lately and we have some partly cloudy skies on top of the nearly full moon, so I decided to give my new-to-me 130 some visual only time. I had Sky Safari driving the CP5 and it was working fine.

Caveat: I don't have a huge selection of eyepieces, so this is pretty limited. I was working with a 25mm Televue plossl and a 8mm Radian as well as a Barlow.

According to Astrospheric, Seeing is average. Being directly under the jet stream here in Northern California, expectations are always low, especially as we head toward winter. 

Luna: I kept the moon at 34x, but she was lovely. Just the barest edge of the eastern edge was in shadow but it was super crisp. I am not very experienced with lunar observation, but the view was great.

Almach: Gamma Andromeda is a lovely double star system very similar to Albireo with a large bright yellow star paired with a smaller blue star. The color contrast is beautiful with the blue member to the upper right of the yellow star. This is not all that difficult to split and was easy at 100x.

Zeta Aquarii: This was a slightly more challenging target. I could see a peanut at 100x, but you drive a truck through the pair at 200x. Seeing was steadying quite a bit because I could clearly see the first diffraction rings around each star and they weren't bouncing around much. The two members appeared in a N-S orientation with each other.

Now here's where it gets surprising.

Epsilon Arietis: Yes I managed to split this tight pair. They are listed at 1.3" separation and was able to cleanly split the pair. I was not expecting this.

Jupiter: With only 5" of aperture, there isn't a whole lot of detail one can see. The Galilean moons were not quite disks as they would be in 10+" scopes. Equatorial banding was easily seen with moments of detail showing in the clouds. A little patience paid off and I could sense just a little bit of festooning. The red spot was not visible.

Uranus: A little gem. Clearly blue disk visible at 200x. My first time seeing it visually. Nerded out on this one.

I finished with the double-double. Epsilon Lyrae is not a challenged for the scope, but I can't resist looking when it is visible. At 200x, there was plenty of daylight there on both pairs.

This is a fantastic telescope. The thermal stability really beats the tar out of my Esprit 120. That is where it truly exceeds the Sky-Watcher. Of course it is better in other ways, but its a little more subtle. The thermal stability is NOT subtle.

Thanks Roland. I don't if you were ever thanked 20+ years ago when this was first made, but let me make amends for that. This is such a fine instrument. I couldn't be happier with it.

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: Tripod mounting of 1600GTO

Howard Ritter
 

Thanks, Christopher. What you describe is what I had envisioned for the tripod and the 1600. Using it would also enable the 1600 to carry the Meade OTA, which would be Plan B if I don’t get to my notional PlaneWave 14”. Pretty and versatile aren’t necessary to the idea I have of stationing the installation (semi-)permanently on my patio, to be protected with a bespoke heavy, aluminized, weatherproof shroud, nor to the possibility of taking the whole shebang in pieces back and forth in a U-Haul to our Florida winter home for the 5 months or so that we spend there.

(Parenthetically, I’d like to know whether you're familiar with Optec’s field flattener/focal reducer for the classic Meade 16” SCT. Optec claims, with some evidence, that this accessory makes the Classic’s optical performance equivalent to that of the current ACF design. Considering the cost differential between keeping the Meade OTA and selling it to buy a PlaneWave 14", would I be just as well advised to stay with the Meade + Optec?)

I’ve found a local machine shop whose boss is fascinated by my reasons for bringing in telescope parts for modification, and they could certainly do the work. But if there’s no problem drilling and tapping the top plate of the tripod to take the FSA, why not just drill and tap for direct mounting of the 1600?

Thanks again!

—howard



On Nov 16, 2021, at 4:54 PM, Christopher Erickson <christopher.k.erickson@...> wrote:

The LX200-16 tripod will work without much effort but it isn't very pretty or versatile. I have one so I am speaking from experience.

It would be very simple to place the AP 1612FSA Flat Surface Adapter on the Meade tripod top and mark, drill and tap the correct mounting holes on the tripod. Then attach the FSA and then the mount.

The new threaded holes can easily be created with simple hand tools. Or if you prefer, a machine shop or maybe even a handy friend could help you out.

And the new threaded holes would not prevent the tripod from still being used with the Meade LX200-16 scope, if desired.

The Meade super-giant field tripod isn't very tall and you might consider adding a half-pier to it.  
 
"Always take the high road. There's less traffic."

-Christopher Erickson
Observatory Engineer
Summit Kinetics
Waikoloa, Hawaii


On Tue, Nov 16, 2021 at 5:28 AM Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
The eagle pier is not meant for the 1600. We have 10" diameter piers for the larger mounts. They come in several lengths, depending on what scope you have. For a short SCT type, I would recommend using the shortest pier to keep the mount low to the ground.

Roland



-----Original Message-----
From: Howard Ritter via groups.io <howard.ritter=mac.com@groups.io>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Mon, Nov 15, 2021 11:17 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Tripod mounting of 1600GTO

Thanks, Roland. I had been looking at the Eagle portable pier, but the listing doesn’t mention the 1600GTO. Are the two adaptable to each other and play nicely together?

By the way, my 25-year-old 155EDF says “Hi, Dad!”

—howard

On Nov 15, 2021, at 4:42 PM, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011@...> wrote:

For the 1600 nothing beats an ATS for rigidity. I have found that wood tripods like the Berlebach will twist slightly with variable moisture in the atmosphere, and thus change the polar alignment. Not my choice for a permanent setup, but fine for portable use.

Our portable piers are also great for backyard setups and don't cost as much as the ATS.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: Howard Ritter via groups.io <howard.ritter@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Mon, Nov 15, 2021 2:43 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] Tripod mounting of 1600GTO

I have been hoping to put my 1600GTO mount, due in February, on a pedestal in my side yard. This is looking like it may not be feasible, and I’m thinking again of the idea of tripod mounting. I have a Meade Giant Field Tripod for my 16” LX200 that I could have an adapter machined for, but that tripod may be too much to deal with easily.

I have a spare Berlebach Planet tripod rated for 120 kg, but I don’t know whether it’s adequate for the 100 kg of mount, scope, and counterweights that I have in mind (PlaneWave 14”, or failing that, a C14).

If the Planet is marginal for astroimaging with this setup, what’s a good option? Berlebach makes a bigger tripod, the Graviton, rated for 220 kg, but it’s 5x the cost of a Planet. The listing fo the A-P Eagle doesn’t mention a mount as big as the 1600. That leaves the Bisque Pyramid.

Any thoughts? Experiences?

—howard







--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics




130 EDFS

KHursh
 
Edited

And now for something completely different...

My acquisition computer didn't like the over 90% humidity we've had lately and we have some partly cloudy skies on top of the nearly full moon, so I decided to give my new-to-me 130 some visual only time. I had Sky Safari driving the CP5 and it was working fine.

Caveat: I don't have a huge selection of eyepieces, so this is pretty limited. I was working with a 25mm Televue plossl and a 8mm Radian as well as a Barlow.

According to Astrospheric, Seeing is average. Being directly under the jet stream here in Northern California, expectations are always low, especially as we head toward winter. 

Luna: I kept the moon at 34x, but she was lovely. Just the barest edge of the eastern edge was in shadow but it was super crisp. I am not very experienced with lunar observation, but the view was great.

Almach: Gamma Andromeda is a lovely double star system very similar to Albireo with a large bright yellow star paired with a smaller blue star. The color contrast is beautiful with the blue member to the upper right of the yellow star. This is not all that difficult to split and was easy at 100x.

Zeta Aquarii: This was a slightly more challenging target. I could see a peanut at 100x, but you drive a truck through the pair at 200x. Seeing was steadying quite a bit because I could clearly see the first diffraction rings around each star and they weren't bouncing around much. The two members appeared in a N-S orientation with each other.

Now here's where it gets surprising.

Epsilon Arietis: Yes I managed to split this tight pair. They are listed at 1.3" separation and was able to cleanly split the pair. I was not expecting this.

Jupiter: With only 5" of aperture, there isn't a whole lot of detail one can see. The Galilean moons were not quite disks as they would be in 10+" scopes. Equatorial banding was easily seen with moments of detail showing in the clouds. A little patience paid off and I could sense just a little bit of festooning. The red spot was not visible.

Uranus: A little gem. Clearly blue disk visible at 200x. My first time seeing it visually. Nerded out on this one.

I finished with the double-double. Epsilon Lyrae is not a challenged for the scope, but I can't resist looking when it is visible. At 200x, there was plenty of daylight there on both pairs.

This is a fantastic telescope. The thermal stability really beats the tar out of my Esprit 120. That is where it truly exceeds the Sky-Watcher. Of course it is better in other ways, but its a little more subtle. The thermal stability is NOT subtle.

Thanks Roland. I don't if you were ever thanked 20+ years ago when this was first made, but let me make amends for that. This is such a fine instrument. I couldn't be happier with it.

Kevin


Re: [ap-ug] Glazed Donut

Roland Christen
 


BTW, I had fun searching out all the faint galaxies you also captured. 
What did you find? How faint?

Roland


-----Original Message-----
From: Jeff B <mnebula946@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Cc: main@ap-ug.groups.io
Sent: Tue, Nov 16, 2021 7:15 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] [ap-ug] Glazed Donut

Pretty cool Roland.  Yeah it does look like a glazed donut.  Now I'm hungry.  

BTW, I had fun searching out all the faint galaxies you also captured.  That's pretty cool too.

Jeff

On Tue, Nov 16, 2021 at 5:51 PM Pete Lardizabal <p14@...> wrote:
👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻

😎

Pete

On Nov 16, 2021, at 2:40 PM, Roland Christen via groups.io <chris1011=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:


Hello Astronuts,

This is image #2 from my Hawaiian observatory. The image consists of 60 x600 sec LRGB subs. Imaging scope was the 175EDF at F7.5 (no flattener or compressor, just straight on).

To me it looks like a glazed donut, but it's also known as the Spare Tire Nebula. :^))

What's interesting is that there are no dust defects visible in the image, even though I did not use any flats. They are there, but just not visible because the sky is so dark in Hawaii that there was essentially no background flux. I did get several satellite trails in the red subs early in the morning. Median combine did a fair job of minimizing them


Rolando

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics

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