Date   

Re: 92mm Stowaway 4th Run Update

Marcelo Figueroa
 

How does it work for international orders, do I have to sign up with my local distributor or directly on the link provided?. 

And then, if I am selected, I deal with my local distributor and he takes care of the collection and delivery?.


Re: 92mm Stowaway 4th Run Update

Jeff B
 

Cool.


On Fri, Jul 23, 2021 at 3:17 PM Karen Christen <karen@...> wrote:

Hello Astro-Nuts,

The fourth production run of our 92mm f6.65 Stowaway is well underway and we have contacted all of the remaining people who had signed up on our notification list in April 2018.  Roland fulfilled his promise of making enough scopes for everyone who signed up the first time who wanted one.  We are producing more scopes that will need a good home. So, now what do we do? 

After much deliberation we’ve decided to offer the remaining scopes in a random-drawing format.  This is a departure from our usual processes, so we know you have questions.  We have answers:

Why can’t I just order one? We wanted to provide an equal opportunity to people who would really like to own and use this scope. If we simply opened our phone lines to take orders, it would favor people who live in particular time zones and only those who happened to hear about it. We anticipate that they would have sold out very quickly, possibly even before people on the other side of the globe were awake. Since we have an international following, we wanted to give everyone an opportunity.

What do you mean, random drawing?  For one week from Friday, July 30 to Friday, August 6 (12pm noon central daylight savings time), anyone can sign up on the 92mm Stowaway 2021 Random Drawing Entry form.  It does not matter when you sign up, as long as it’s within the sign-up window.  From this group of interested people, we will randomly choose the people who will be notified of the opportunity to purchase a 92mm Stowaway.

Why aren’t you just notifying people in order of when they signed up, like usual?  Traditionally we have collected names of those interested in a particular product in chronological order and notified folks of the opportunity to purchase the item in that order.  We’ve occasionally received criticism, most especially if the list is only open for a short time, from folks who were unaware of the list, on vacation, on the other side of the world and asleep when the list was open, etc.

We only have a limited number of Stowaways and wanted to give everyone an equal chance to purchase one.  With advanced notice and a one-week sign-up window, we hope to catch everyone who might be interested in this scope.

How do I sign up?  Go to the 92mm Stowaway 2021 Random Drawing Entry form and fill in all the required fields, including your name, phone number, email address and billing address.  The link to this form will be available on July 30th at noon on the Availability tab of the 92mm Stowaway website page: www.astro-physics.com/92f665

When can I sign up?  The 92mm Stowaway 2021 Random Drawing Entry form will be available from July 30 to August 6 (12pm noon central daylight savings time for both). 

Will I receive a confirmation of my sign-up?  Yes.  Following submission, a confirmation window will appear. Assuming that you provided a valid email address, you will also receive an auto-generated confirmation email with all of the information that you provided for your reference. If you do NOT receive a confirmation email, it may be in your spam folder or you may have entered an incorrect email address. 

When will I know if I was selected?  After the deadline, we will contact the people whose names we draw randomly from the entries. This process may take several months since we do not sell the final scopes in the run until they are completed. We will post periodic messages on the Availability tab of the 92mm Stowaway website page regarding the status of the drawing: www.astro-physics.com/92f665

When would I pay for my order?  The order process will remain the same as usual: Once you’re notified, you will have 2 weeks to decide whether to purchase and submit a 50% deposit.  At that time a scope will be reserved for you and we will provide an estimated date of delivery.

We wish you luck!

The Astro-Folks

 


--
Karen Christen
Astro-Physics


92mm Stowaway 4th Run Update

Karen Christen
 

Hello Astro-Nuts,

The fourth production run of our 92mm f6.65 Stowaway is well underway and we have contacted all of the remaining people who had signed up on our notification list in April 2018.  Roland fulfilled his promise of making enough scopes for everyone who signed up the first time who wanted one.  We are producing more scopes that will need a good home. So, now what do we do? 

After much deliberation we’ve decided to offer the remaining scopes in a random-drawing format.  This is a departure from our usual processes, so we know you have questions.  We have answers:

Why can’t I just order one? We wanted to provide an equal opportunity to people who would really like to own and use this scope. If we simply opened our phone lines to take orders, it would favor people who live in particular time zones and only those who happened to hear about it. We anticipate that they would have sold out very quickly, possibly even before people on the other side of the globe were awake. Since we have an international following, we wanted to give everyone an opportunity.

What do you mean, random drawing?  For one week from Friday, July 30 to Friday, August 6 (12pm noon central daylight savings time), anyone can sign up on the 92mm Stowaway 2021 Random Drawing Entry form.  It does not matter when you sign up, as long as it’s within the sign-up window.  From this group of interested people, we will randomly choose the people who will be notified of the opportunity to purchase a 92mm Stowaway.

Why aren’t you just notifying people in order of when they signed up, like usual?  Traditionally we have collected names of those interested in a particular product in chronological order and notified folks of the opportunity to purchase the item in that order.  We’ve occasionally received criticism, most especially if the list is only open for a short time, from folks who were unaware of the list, on vacation, on the other side of the world and asleep when the list was open, etc.

We only have a limited number of Stowaways and wanted to give everyone an equal chance to purchase one.  With advanced notice and a one-week sign-up window, we hope to catch everyone who might be interested in this scope.

How do I sign up?  Go to the 92mm Stowaway 2021 Random Drawing Entry form and fill in all the required fields, including your name, phone number, email address and billing address.  The link to this form will be available on July 30th at noon on the Availability tab of the 92mm Stowaway website page: www.astro-physics.com/92f665

When can I sign up?  The 92mm Stowaway 2021 Random Drawing Entry form will be available from July 30 to August 6 (12pm noon central daylight savings time for both). 

Will I receive a confirmation of my sign-up?  Yes.  Following submission, a confirmation window will appear. Assuming that you provided a valid email address, you will also receive an auto-generated confirmation email with all of the information that you provided for your reference. If you do NOT receive a confirmation email, it may be in your spam folder or you may have entered an incorrect email address. 

When will I know if I was selected?  After the deadline, we will contact the people whose names we draw randomly from the entries. This process may take several months since we do not sell the final scopes in the run until they are completed. We will post periodic messages on the Availability tab of the 92mm Stowaway website page regarding the status of the drawing: www.astro-physics.com/92f665

When would I pay for my order?  The order process will remain the same as usual: Once you’re notified, you will have 2 weeks to decide whether to purchase and submit a 50% deposit.  At that time a scope will be reserved for you and we will provide an estimated date of delivery.

We wish you luck!

The Astro-Folks

 


--
Karen Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: Database load unsuccessful

George
 

Mike,

 

Did you replace the battery?   It is dead.

 

Regards,

 

George

 

George Whitney

Astro-Physics, Inc.

Phone:  815-222-6538 (direct line)

Phone:  815-282-1513 (office)

Email:  george@...

 

From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mike Garrett
Sent: Friday, July 23, 2021 11:16 AM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: [ap-gto] Database load unsuccessful

 

I've tried 3 times to reload the keypad database with the same result.

Goto to anything other than stars or planets results in "Object below horizon".

Everything appears to be normal during the reload process.

 

Any ideas?

Thanks

Mike


Database load unsuccessful

Mike Garrett
 

I've tried 3 times to reload the keypad database with the same result.
Goto to anything other than stars or planets results in "Object below horizon".
Everything appears to be normal during the reload process.

Any ideas?
Thanks
Mike


Re: Imaging in the Wind

Robert Chozick
 

We have found that the smaller the structure the less this effect you mention applies.   8x8 seems to be optimal.   Light is always a concern for me.   


On Jul 23, 2021, at 7:53 AM, Len Fulham <lfulham@...> wrote:

I would like to make a comment re wind barrier and effectiveness.  With a impervious barrier such as a metal fence or tarp, there can be quite high forces applied to the structure and a lot of turbulence in the air as wind rolls in behind the barrier. It is my understanding that a barrier with perforations suppresses wind and reduces the turbulence effects and lowers the forces acting on the structure. Coarsely applied, this can be seen in canvas signs which often have holes cut in them. I have seen good effects from shade cloth and fly screen used in this role.

If anyone is making a tarp based barrier for portable use it is a simple process to try the fly mesh or a fairly open shade cloth instead of a tight material like a tarp. If the purpose is mainly as a light barrier then a opaque sheet would be preferred of course.

Just another idea to make your choices harder!

Len.


Re: Imaging in the Wind

Len Fulham
 

I would like to make a comment re wind barrier and effectiveness.  With a impervious barrier such as a metal fence or tarp, there can be quite high forces applied to the structure and a lot of turbulence in the air as wind rolls in behind the barrier. It is my understanding that a barrier with perforations suppresses wind and reduces the turbulence effects and lowers the forces acting on the structure. Coarsely applied, this can be seen in canvas signs which often have holes cut in them. I have seen good effects from shade cloth and fly screen used in this role.

If anyone is making a tarp based barrier for portable use it is a simple process to try the fly mesh or a fairly open shade cloth instead of a tight material like a tarp. If the purpose is mainly as a light barrier then a opaque sheet would be preferred of course.

Just another idea to make your choices harder!

Len.


Re: Imaging in the Wind

Robert Chozick
 

Yes. 

Robert 


On Jul 22, 2021, at 7:24 PM, W Hilmo <y.groups@...> wrote:



Thanks for that.

 

It looks like all of the rigidity is from guy wires, correct?

 

From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert Chozick via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 22, 2021 4:26 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Imaging in the Wind

 

 

Picture of wind shelter 

Robert 

 



On Jul 22, 2021, at 5:45 PM, Robert Chozick via groups.io <rchozick@...> wrote:

The temporary conduit solution works very well and is anchored with stakes and ropes. We use this at the Okie Tex star party and get gusts close to 60 miles an hour all the time setting up for a weeks time. You can set up the conduit and tarp shelter in less than an hour and it’s stores in a small area. I will find some pictures and send them. 

Robert 

 



On Jul 22, 2021, at 3:40 PM, W Hilmo <y.groups@...> wrote:



I think so, too.

 

The problem is that my wife would prefer if I not sink fence posts into concrete for a temporary solution.  My fear is that without a really solid anchor, our wind would simply blow it away.  We’ve been seeing 30ish mph for the last couple of weeks, but it can get significantly higher than that with little warning.

 

Also, if the fence were upwind, which is would need to be to function, any wind strong enough to move it, would blow it right into the scope.

 

From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert Chozick via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 22, 2021 11:25 AM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Imaging in the Wind

 

A simple fence enclosure model would help greatly. 

Robert 

 




On Jul 22, 2021, at 1:04 PM, W Hilmo <y.groups@...> wrote:



I just wanted to follow up and say that using the motorhome as a wind block made a huge difference.

 

Based on the below results with the 175 refractor, I assume at this point that the mount itself is probably not the issue.  I have the rig set up on ground that is quite solid, and am using the 10” diameter portable field pier.  The pier height is 32” from the ground.

 

I’m wondering if the issue is that I leave the mount set up on the pier all the time.  In the last couple of weeks, our temperature has varied between 45F and 115F.  I suspect that the thermal cycling may affect the turn buckles.  It seems like they could be tighter than they are (although I find that if I tighten too much, it bends the hooks at the end of the turn buckles so that they open up).  I don’t adjust them often because I have a really good APPM model, and would need to recreate it each time.

 

I have plans for an observatory with a proper pier with a deep underground footing, but that won’t be until sometime next year at the earliest.  I’m going to need to find a temporary solution for between now and then. 

 

From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of W Hilmo
Sent: Tuesday, July 20, 2021 4:44 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Imaging in the Wind

 

Interesting.  If I can get tracking like you are seeing, that would be great.  If I unplug the encoders, I’ll either need to set up guiding or program a PEM curve.

 

Out of curiosity, what you are using for a pier?  I am using the portable field pier, and if the whole thing is shaking, perhaps I could tighten the turnbuckles a bit.


Oh, and one other thing that may be interesting, or may be nothing, I never get tight stars that are elongated.  I either get tight, round stars, or I get big elongated blobs.  I also get satellite lots and lots of satellite trails, and they are generally straight lines.  I was thinking that these satellites just happened to coincide with some strong gusts.

 

-Wade

 

From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roland Christen via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, July 20, 2021 4:32 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Imaging in the Wind

 

You can unplug the encoders and see what you get.

 

I got 30mph wind gusts here last couple of days with my 175 refractor on a 1600 encoder mount. Got round stars. Was watching the autoguider graph and saw only 1 arc sec or so deviations during a gust.

 

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: W Hilmo <y.groups@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Tue, Jul 20, 2021 1:25 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] Imaging in the Wind

I've been doing a bunch of experimenting to transition from guided imaging with an SCT, to unguided imaging with a first class refractor.  Coincident to this, I'm imaging in a particularly windy area, which I moved to a few months before I received my AP130GTX.  Previously, I lived in an area with lots of overcast, but little wind.  It was also sheltered by being completely surrounded by forest.  My current location is wide open and completely unsheltered from the wind.

As mentioned, the scope is an AP130GTX.  The mount is an AP1600 with Absolute Encoders.  I'm finding that on calm nights (which are rare this time of year), I get nice, round stars at 10 minutes unguided.  With our typical winds, which are around 30mph over night, I get blobby and elongated stars.  Last night was windy, so the subs were all soft, with poor eccentricity.  I'm trying to determine how much of my soft stars are the the result of turbulence higher up, versus the mount and scope getting buffeted by the wind.

When I was blinking through the subs, I found the image that I've attached below.  It's interesting because there are crossing satellite trails at very different angles, that show signs of significant vibration.  I am guessing that what is happening here, is that the system is getting buffeted by winds, and the jaggies are due to the absolute encoders trying to quickly make corrections.  But I would be interested in other thoughts.

For tonight, I'm going to image the same field, but I've parked my motorhome up wind of the mount to act as a block.  The motorhome is parked 90 degrees to the prevailing wind, and is as close as I can get it while still keeping the roof at about 20 degrees elevation from the scope.  We are forecast for similar winds tonight, and the wind today seems consistent with yesterday.  I'll be curious to see if the results improve.  I'm not sure yet if turbulence as wind goes over and around the motorhome will be more than offset by sheltering the mount.

I am planning for an observatory, and have been thinking all along of a roll-off roof.  I suppose that if tonight's data looks good, perhaps I should be thinking about a dome.  Since I'm not planning on building the observatory until next year, I am also planning on experimenting with different wind blocks (presuming I can find something less than the motorhome, which can stand up to our winds on a regular basis).

If anyone else has dealt with this, I would be interested in how people have dealt with this.  I suppose that I could switch to only wide field imaging during the windiest times of the year, but if possible, I would like to mitigate things.

-Wade


--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics

Attachments:

Attachments:


Re: AP 105Traveler and a Daystar ATM H-Alpha filter troubles

Dale Ghent
 


This looks like an old University model. It’s likely that it will need new blockers and trimmers after all these years. You can send it to Daystar and they can rehab it for you. 

I took and old University model that I bought for cheap and sent it in to them. They checked the etalon and transplanted it into a Quantum PE housing with new blockers and trimmers for $2000, and included a fresh warranty. They also recharacterized the bandpass. It turned out to be 0.45Å, not the 0.5Å that it was originally labeled as.  

On Jul 22, 2021, at 20:46, CaptMax <captmax@...> wrote:

I appreciate all the help everyone, thank you. This is one of the early Daystar filters back when Del Woods built them individually himself. It has the nice German red glass ERF filter on the objective and uses 110V for the heater and filter adjustment. Here are a few pics I found online while researching my problem. I think I have a better idea now and will try again tomorrow or this weekend. I will post any progress. 
CaptMax
<EFF363CE-71BF-4214-9849-008F1975CB7B.jpeg>
<BD66C60C-50AD-4A2C-A495-A68D98B732C3.jpeg>


Re: AP 105Traveler and a Daystar ATM H-Alpha filter troubles

CaptMax
 

I appreciate all the help everyone, thank you. This is one of the early Daystar filters back when Del Woods built them individually himself. It has the nice German red glass ERF filter on the objective and uses 110V for the heater and filter adjustment. Here are a few pics I found online while researching my problem. I think I have a better idea now and will try again tomorrow or this weekend. I will post any progress. 
CaptMax


Re: Imaging in the Wind

W Hilmo
 

Thanks for that.

 

It looks like all of the rigidity is from guy wires, correct?

 

From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert Chozick via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 22, 2021 4:26 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Imaging in the Wind

 

 

Picture of wind shelter 

Robert 

 



On Jul 22, 2021, at 5:45 PM, Robert Chozick via groups.io <rchozick@...> wrote:

The temporary conduit solution works very well and is anchored with stakes and ropes. We use this at the Okie Tex star party and get gusts close to 60 miles an hour all the time setting up for a weeks time. You can set up the conduit and tarp shelter in less than an hour and it’s stores in a small area. I will find some pictures and send them. 

Robert 

 



On Jul 22, 2021, at 3:40 PM, W Hilmo <y.groups@...> wrote:



I think so, too.

 

The problem is that my wife would prefer if I not sink fence posts into concrete for a temporary solution.  My fear is that without a really solid anchor, our wind would simply blow it away.  We’ve been seeing 30ish mph for the last couple of weeks, but it can get significantly higher than that with little warning.

 

Also, if the fence were upwind, which is would need to be to function, any wind strong enough to move it, would blow it right into the scope.

 

From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert Chozick via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 22, 2021 11:25 AM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Imaging in the Wind

 

A simple fence enclosure model would help greatly. 

Robert 

 




On Jul 22, 2021, at 1:04 PM, W Hilmo <y.groups@...> wrote:



I just wanted to follow up and say that using the motorhome as a wind block made a huge difference.

 

Based on the below results with the 175 refractor, I assume at this point that the mount itself is probably not the issue.  I have the rig set up on ground that is quite solid, and am using the 10” diameter portable field pier.  The pier height is 32” from the ground.

 

I’m wondering if the issue is that I leave the mount set up on the pier all the time.  In the last couple of weeks, our temperature has varied between 45F and 115F.  I suspect that the thermal cycling may affect the turn buckles.  It seems like they could be tighter than they are (although I find that if I tighten too much, it bends the hooks at the end of the turn buckles so that they open up).  I don’t adjust them often because I have a really good APPM model, and would need to recreate it each time.

 

I have plans for an observatory with a proper pier with a deep underground footing, but that won’t be until sometime next year at the earliest.  I’m going to need to find a temporary solution for between now and then. 

 

From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of W Hilmo
Sent: Tuesday, July 20, 2021 4:44 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Imaging in the Wind

 

Interesting.  If I can get tracking like you are seeing, that would be great.  If I unplug the encoders, I’ll either need to set up guiding or program a PEM curve.

 

Out of curiosity, what you are using for a pier?  I am using the portable field pier, and if the whole thing is shaking, perhaps I could tighten the turnbuckles a bit.


Oh, and one other thing that may be interesting, or may be nothing, I never get tight stars that are elongated.  I either get tight, round stars, or I get big elongated blobs.  I also get satellite lots and lots of satellite trails, and they are generally straight lines.  I was thinking that these satellites just happened to coincide with some strong gusts.

 

-Wade

 

From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roland Christen via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, July 20, 2021 4:32 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Imaging in the Wind

 

You can unplug the encoders and see what you get.

 

I got 30mph wind gusts here last couple of days with my 175 refractor on a 1600 encoder mount. Got round stars. Was watching the autoguider graph and saw only 1 arc sec or so deviations during a gust.

 

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: W Hilmo <y.groups@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Tue, Jul 20, 2021 1:25 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] Imaging in the Wind

I've been doing a bunch of experimenting to transition from guided imaging with an SCT, to unguided imaging with a first class refractor.  Coincident to this, I'm imaging in a particularly windy area, which I moved to a few months before I received my AP130GTX.  Previously, I lived in an area with lots of overcast, but little wind.  It was also sheltered by being completely surrounded by forest.  My current location is wide open and completely unsheltered from the wind.

As mentioned, the scope is an AP130GTX.  The mount is an AP1600 with Absolute Encoders.  I'm finding that on calm nights (which are rare this time of year), I get nice, round stars at 10 minutes unguided.  With our typical winds, which are around 30mph over night, I get blobby and elongated stars.  Last night was windy, so the subs were all soft, with poor eccentricity.  I'm trying to determine how much of my soft stars are the the result of turbulence higher up, versus the mount and scope getting buffeted by the wind.

When I was blinking through the subs, I found the image that I've attached below.  It's interesting because there are crossing satellite trails at very different angles, that show signs of significant vibration.  I am guessing that what is happening here, is that the system is getting buffeted by winds, and the jaggies are due to the absolute encoders trying to quickly make corrections.  But I would be interested in other thoughts.

For tonight, I'm going to image the same field, but I've parked my motorhome up wind of the mount to act as a block.  The motorhome is parked 90 degrees to the prevailing wind, and is as close as I can get it while still keeping the roof at about 20 degrees elevation from the scope.  We are forecast for similar winds tonight, and the wind today seems consistent with yesterday.  I'll be curious to see if the results improve.  I'm not sure yet if turbulence as wind goes over and around the motorhome will be more than offset by sheltering the mount.

I am planning for an observatory, and have been thinking all along of a roll-off roof.  I suppose that if tonight's data looks good, perhaps I should be thinking about a dome.  Since I'm not planning on building the observatory until next year, I am also planning on experimenting with different wind blocks (presuming I can find something less than the motorhome, which can stand up to our winds on a regular basis).

If anyone else has dealt with this, I would be interested in how people have dealt with this.  I suppose that I could switch to only wide field imaging during the windiest times of the year, but if possible, I would like to mitigate things.

-Wade


--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics

Attachments:

Attachments:


Re: Imaging in the Wind

Robert Chozick
 


Picture of wind shelter 
Robert 


On Jul 22, 2021, at 5:45 PM, Robert Chozick via groups.io <rchozick@...> wrote:

The temporary conduit solution works very well and is anchored with stakes and ropes. We use this at the Okie Tex star party and get gusts close to 60 miles an hour all the time setting up for a weeks time. You can set up the conduit and tarp shelter in less than an hour and it’s stores in a small area. I will find some pictures and send them. 

Robert 


On Jul 22, 2021, at 3:40 PM, W Hilmo <y.groups@...> wrote:



I think so, too.

 

The problem is that my wife would prefer if I not sink fence posts into concrete for a temporary solution.  My fear is that without a really solid anchor, our wind would simply blow it away.  We’ve been seeing 30ish mph for the last couple of weeks, but it can get significantly higher than that with little warning.

 

Also, if the fence were upwind, which is would need to be to function, any wind strong enough to move it, would blow it right into the scope.

 

From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert Chozick via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 22, 2021 11:25 AM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Imaging in the Wind

 

A simple fence enclosure model would help greatly. 

Robert 

 



On Jul 22, 2021, at 1:04 PM, W Hilmo <y.groups@...> wrote:



I just wanted to follow up and say that using the motorhome as a wind block made a huge difference.

 

Based on the below results with the 175 refractor, I assume at this point that the mount itself is probably not the issue.  I have the rig set up on ground that is quite solid, and am using the 10” diameter portable field pier.  The pier height is 32” from the ground.

 

I’m wondering if the issue is that I leave the mount set up on the pier all the time.  In the last couple of weeks, our temperature has varied between 45F and 115F.  I suspect that the thermal cycling may affect the turn buckles.  It seems like they could be tighter than they are (although I find that if I tighten too much, it bends the hooks at the end of the turn buckles so that they open up).  I don’t adjust them often because I have a really good APPM model, and would need to recreate it each time.

 

I have plans for an observatory with a proper pier with a deep underground footing, but that won’t be until sometime next year at the earliest.  I’m going to need to find a temporary solution for between now and then. 

 

From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of W Hilmo
Sent: Tuesday, July 20, 2021 4:44 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Imaging in the Wind

 

Interesting.  If I can get tracking like you are seeing, that would be great.  If I unplug the encoders, I’ll either need to set up guiding or program a PEM curve.

 

Out of curiosity, what you are using for a pier?  I am using the portable field pier, and if the whole thing is shaking, perhaps I could tighten the turnbuckles a bit.


Oh, and one other thing that may be interesting, or may be nothing, I never get tight stars that are elongated.  I either get tight, round stars, or I get big elongated blobs.  I also get satellite lots and lots of satellite trails, and they are generally straight lines.  I was thinking that these satellites just happened to coincide with some strong gusts.

 

-Wade

 

From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roland Christen via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, July 20, 2021 4:32 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Imaging in the Wind

 

You can unplug the encoders and see what you get.

 

I got 30mph wind gusts here last couple of days with my 175 refractor on a 1600 encoder mount. Got round stars. Was watching the autoguider graph and saw only 1 arc sec or so deviations during a gust.

 

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: W Hilmo <y.groups@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Tue, Jul 20, 2021 1:25 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] Imaging in the Wind

I've been doing a bunch of experimenting to transition from guided imaging with an SCT, to unguided imaging with a first class refractor.  Coincident to this, I'm imaging in a particularly windy area, which I moved to a few months before I received my AP130GTX.  Previously, I lived in an area with lots of overcast, but little wind.  It was also sheltered by being completely surrounded by forest.  My current location is wide open and completely unsheltered from the wind.

As mentioned, the scope is an AP130GTX.  The mount is an AP1600 with Absolute Encoders.  I'm finding that on calm nights (which are rare this time of year), I get nice, round stars at 10 minutes unguided.  With our typical winds, which are around 30mph over night, I get blobby and elongated stars.  Last night was windy, so the subs were all soft, with poor eccentricity.  I'm trying to determine how much of my soft stars are the the result of turbulence higher up, versus the mount and scope getting buffeted by the wind.

When I was blinking through the subs, I found the image that I've attached below.  It's interesting because there are crossing satellite trails at very different angles, that show signs of significant vibration.  I am guessing that what is happening here, is that the system is getting buffeted by winds, and the jaggies are due to the absolute encoders trying to quickly make corrections.  But I would be interested in other thoughts.

For tonight, I'm going to image the same field, but I've parked my motorhome up wind of the mount to act as a block.  The motorhome is parked 90 degrees to the prevailing wind, and is as close as I can get it while still keeping the roof at about 20 degrees elevation from the scope.  We are forecast for similar winds tonight, and the wind today seems consistent with yesterday.  I'll be curious to see if the results improve.  I'm not sure yet if turbulence as wind goes over and around the motorhome will be more than offset by sheltering the mount.

I am planning for an observatory, and have been thinking all along of a roll-off roof.  I suppose that if tonight's data looks good, perhaps I should be thinking about a dome.  Since I'm not planning on building the observatory until next year, I am also planning on experimenting with different wind blocks (presuming I can find something less than the motorhome, which can stand up to our winds on a regular basis).

If anyone else has dealt with this, I would be interested in how people have dealt with this.  I suppose that I could switch to only wide field imaging during the windiest times of the year, but if possible, I would like to mitigate things.

-Wade


--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics

Attachments:


Re: AP 105Traveler and a Daystar ATM H-Alpha filter troubles

Dale Ghent
 

This, but also put a 2" IR cut filter on the front of the diagonal.

On Jul 22, 2021, at 18:34, Frost David <frosty5@gmail.com> wrote:

Yes. Its in the incorrect order from what I can see. Is it a Quantum? Quark? Cant tell from the pic.

I have a Quantum. It goes focuser > diagonal > Quantum (with a 4x Powermate attached to the endplates) > eyepiece or camera. No spacers of any kind. Reaches focus perfectly. The Powermate screws apart into two pieces, one goes on each side of the Quantum filter and attach to its endplates. One end in the focuser, one end is for eyepieces or cameras.

Or just contact Daystar. They are extremely helpful. There are diagrams somewhere on their website…I had to find them since I did the same thing the first time too. Cant find them right now, and there seem to be a bunch of broken links on their pages.


David



On Jul 22, 2021, at 5:02 PM, CaptMax <captmax@att.net> wrote:

I am struggling to get a Daystar H-Alpha filter working with my 105 Traveler. The problem is bringing it in focus. I am using the ERF red glass filter with this as well. Pretty sure it is due to incorrect focal length or the fact that it needs to be operated at an f30. Has anyone had experience playing with one of these on a Traveler? Any insight is greatly appreciated, thank-you for any and all replies.
CaptMax <BD1D6E0B-912F-410D-8A31-72BA958433DD.jpeg>


Re: AP 105Traveler and a Daystar ATM H-Alpha filter troubles

Anthony DAngelo
 

This is how I have setup on a Brandon 94


On Jul 22, 2021, at 6:03 PM, CaptMax <captmax@...> wrote:

I am struggling to get a Daystar H-Alpha filter working with my 105 Traveler. The problem is bringing it in focus. I am using the ERF red glass filter with this as well. Pretty sure it is due to incorrect focal length or the fact that it needs to be operated at an f30. Has anyone had experience playing with one of these on a Traveler? Any insight is greatly appreciated, thank-you for any and all replies. 
CaptMax 
<BD1D6E0B-912F-410D-8A31-72BA958433DD.jpeg>


Re: AP 105Traveler and a Daystar ATM H-Alpha filter troubles

Anthony DAngelo
 

It appears you may be using Barlow wrong,if it is a televue Barlow the nosepiece unscrews and you should be able to focus better.

On Jul 22, 2021, at 6:03 PM, CaptMax <captmax@...> wrote:

I am struggling to get a Daystar H-Alpha filter working with my 105 Traveler. The problem is bringing it in focus. I am using the ERF red glass filter with this as well. Pretty sure it is due to incorrect focal length or the fact that it needs to be operated at an f30. Has anyone had experience playing with one of these on a Traveler? Any insight is greatly appreciated, thank-you for any and all replies. 
CaptMax 
<BD1D6E0B-912F-410D-8A31-72BA958433DD.jpeg>


Re: Imaging in the Wind

Robert Chozick
 

The temporary conduit solution works very well and is anchored with stakes and ropes. We use this at the Okie Tex star party and get gusts close to 60 miles an hour all the time setting up for a weeks time. You can set up the conduit and tarp shelter in less than an hour and it’s stores in a small area. I will find some pictures and send them. 

Robert 


On Jul 22, 2021, at 3:40 PM, W Hilmo <y.groups@...> wrote:



I think so, too.

 

The problem is that my wife would prefer if I not sink fence posts into concrete for a temporary solution.  My fear is that without a really solid anchor, our wind would simply blow it away.  We’ve been seeing 30ish mph for the last couple of weeks, but it can get significantly higher than that with little warning.

 

Also, if the fence were upwind, which is would need to be to function, any wind strong enough to move it, would blow it right into the scope.

 

From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert Chozick via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 22, 2021 11:25 AM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Imaging in the Wind

 

A simple fence enclosure model would help greatly. 

Robert 

 



On Jul 22, 2021, at 1:04 PM, W Hilmo <y.groups@...> wrote:



I just wanted to follow up and say that using the motorhome as a wind block made a huge difference.

 

Based on the below results with the 175 refractor, I assume at this point that the mount itself is probably not the issue.  I have the rig set up on ground that is quite solid, and am using the 10” diameter portable field pier.  The pier height is 32” from the ground.

 

I’m wondering if the issue is that I leave the mount set up on the pier all the time.  In the last couple of weeks, our temperature has varied between 45F and 115F.  I suspect that the thermal cycling may affect the turn buckles.  It seems like they could be tighter than they are (although I find that if I tighten too much, it bends the hooks at the end of the turn buckles so that they open up).  I don’t adjust them often because I have a really good APPM model, and would need to recreate it each time.

 

I have plans for an observatory with a proper pier with a deep underground footing, but that won’t be until sometime next year at the earliest.  I’m going to need to find a temporary solution for between now and then. 

 

From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of W Hilmo
Sent: Tuesday, July 20, 2021 4:44 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Imaging in the Wind

 

Interesting.  If I can get tracking like you are seeing, that would be great.  If I unplug the encoders, I’ll either need to set up guiding or program a PEM curve.

 

Out of curiosity, what you are using for a pier?  I am using the portable field pier, and if the whole thing is shaking, perhaps I could tighten the turnbuckles a bit.


Oh, and one other thing that may be interesting, or may be nothing, I never get tight stars that are elongated.  I either get tight, round stars, or I get big elongated blobs.  I also get satellite lots and lots of satellite trails, and they are generally straight lines.  I was thinking that these satellites just happened to coincide with some strong gusts.

 

-Wade

 

From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of Roland Christen via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, July 20, 2021 4:32 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Imaging in the Wind

 

You can unplug the encoders and see what you get.

 

I got 30mph wind gusts here last couple of days with my 175 refractor on a 1600 encoder mount. Got round stars. Was watching the autoguider graph and saw only 1 arc sec or so deviations during a gust.

 

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: W Hilmo <y.groups@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Tue, Jul 20, 2021 1:25 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] Imaging in the Wind

I've been doing a bunch of experimenting to transition from guided imaging with an SCT, to unguided imaging with a first class refractor.  Coincident to this, I'm imaging in a particularly windy area, which I moved to a few months before I received my AP130GTX.  Previously, I lived in an area with lots of overcast, but little wind.  It was also sheltered by being completely surrounded by forest.  My current location is wide open and completely unsheltered from the wind.

As mentioned, the scope is an AP130GTX.  The mount is an AP1600 with Absolute Encoders.  I'm finding that on calm nights (which are rare this time of year), I get nice, round stars at 10 minutes unguided.  With our typical winds, which are around 30mph over night, I get blobby and elongated stars.  Last night was windy, so the subs were all soft, with poor eccentricity.  I'm trying to determine how much of my soft stars are the the result of turbulence higher up, versus the mount and scope getting buffeted by the wind.

When I was blinking through the subs, I found the image that I've attached below.  It's interesting because there are crossing satellite trails at very different angles, that show signs of significant vibration.  I am guessing that what is happening here, is that the system is getting buffeted by winds, and the jaggies are due to the absolute encoders trying to quickly make corrections.  But I would be interested in other thoughts.

For tonight, I'm going to image the same field, but I've parked my motorhome up wind of the mount to act as a block.  The motorhome is parked 90 degrees to the prevailing wind, and is as close as I can get it while still keeping the roof at about 20 degrees elevation from the scope.  We are forecast for similar winds tonight, and the wind today seems consistent with yesterday.  I'll be curious to see if the results improve.  I'm not sure yet if turbulence as wind goes over and around the motorhome will be more than offset by sheltering the mount.

I am planning for an observatory, and have been thinking all along of a roll-off roof.  I suppose that if tonight's data looks good, perhaps I should be thinking about a dome.  Since I'm not planning on building the observatory until next year, I am also planning on experimenting with different wind blocks (presuming I can find something less than the motorhome, which can stand up to our winds on a regular basis).

If anyone else has dealt with this, I would be interested in how people have dealt with this.  I suppose that I could switch to only wide field imaging during the windiest times of the year, but if possible, I would like to mitigate things.

-Wade


--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics

Attachments:


Re: AP 105Traveler and a Daystar ATM H-Alpha filter troubles

Frost David
 

Yes.  Its in the incorrect order from what I can see.  Is it a Quantum?  Quark?  Cant tell from the pic.

I have a Quantum.  It goes focuser > diagonal > Quantum (with a 4x Powermate attached to the endplates) > eyepiece or camera.  No spacers of any kind.  Reaches focus perfectly.  The Powermate screws apart into two pieces, one goes on each side of the Quantum filter and attach to its endplates.  One end in the focuser, one end is for eyepieces or cameras.

Or just contact Daystar.  They are extremely helpful.  There are diagrams somewhere on their website…I had to find them since I did the same thing the first time too.  Cant find them right now, and there seem to be a bunch of broken links on their pages.


David



On Jul 22, 2021, at 5:02 PM, CaptMax <captmax@...> wrote:

I am struggling to get a Daystar H-Alpha filter working with my 105 Traveler. The problem is bringing it in focus. I am using the ERF red glass filter with this as well. Pretty sure it is due to incorrect focal length or the fact that it needs to be operated at an f30. Has anyone had experience playing with one of these on a Traveler? Any insight is greatly appreciated, thank-you for any and all replies. 
CaptMax <BD1D6E0B-912F-410D-8A31-72BA958433DD.jpeg>


RAll-sky camera traciing

Mike Dodd
 

I have a ZWO ASI camera that came with a fisheye lens. I've built a wooden bracket to hold the camera on top of the observatory roll-off roof, and this works OK for relatively short exposures (e.g., Geminids last winter).

I would like to capture the summer Milky Way, but I'm concerned that a stack of 1-minute exposures won't go deep enough.

Should I devise a way to mount the camera on my AP1200 + TMB130 OTA so it points straight up while the scope is pointed at Polaris, and let the mount track during a series of longer exposures? Or should I put it on the roof and get a string of 1-minute exposures?

Thanks for all advice.

--- Mike


AP 105Traveler and a Daystar ATM H-Alpha filter troubles

CaptMax
 

I am struggling to get a Daystar H-Alpha filter working with my 105 Traveler. The problem is bringing it in focus. I am using the ERF red glass filter with this as well. Pretty sure it is due to incorrect focal length or the fact that it needs to be operated at an f30. Has anyone had experience playing with one of these on a Traveler? Any insight is greatly appreciated, thank-you for any and all replies. 
CaptMax 


Re: Imaging in the Wind

Joseph Beyer
 

Thinking about the sailing on SF Bay in a stiff wind, I’m wondering if the cables on the pier are a big part of the problem.  Given a high enough wind velocity they would likely vibrate as the mast stay cables do on a sailboat. In that case blocking the wind as you’re already attempting to do should help the problem.  

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