Date   

Re: Can I recal from the ASCOM driver?

Roland Christen
 

You can do a sync in SkyX. Works beautifully.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: Mike Dodd <mike@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Jun 5, 2021 10:26 am
Subject: [ap-gto] Can I recal from the ASCOM driver?

With an equipment change, I might need to re-balance my AP1200. I've
done this before, and am familiar with the procedure to balance in the
Park 4 (or Park 1) position, then start up, slew to a star, center it
with the keypad buttons, then do a Recal with the keypad.

Buy my keypad is disconnected and stored in the house. I'd rather not
hook it up and go through the setup to change from EXT to auto-connect,
then back to EXT afterward.

QUESTION: Can I do the Recal from the ASCOM driver window? I see the
option to use Recal for Sync, and that's always been checked, but I see
no "Recal Now" button.

If not in the ASCOM driver, I'm pretty sure I can use SkyX:
1. Slew to a star.
2. Use the driver's buttons to center the star.
3. Do a Sync in SkyX.

Since the driver is set to use Recal instead of Sync, everything is
copacetic, correct?

Thanks for all information.

--- Mike









--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: Consequence of .5 guide on hand controller and 1x in software?

Roland Christen
 

.5x slows everything down, so it takes twice as long for the mount to respond to a move command. the way mounts work with autoguiders is the following: The guider takes an exposure and determines that the mount is off by a couple of pixels. It sends a command for the mount to move that amount, and ideally it would like to see it move instantly to the proper position. At 1x sidereal it takes 1 second to move 15 arc seconds. It takes 2 seconds at .5x and 4 seconds at .25x. That would seem to be fast enough, and for RA it might be unless you wanted to recover quickly from a 10 arc sec dither. However, there is also the Dec axis to consider. In almost all mounts, even ones with spring loaded worms and belt drives, the reversing backlash delay is anywhere between 10 and 20 arc seconds, so for really tight guiding in Dec you want the mount to be able to respond in a timely manner to a Dec reversal command. It might take a second at 1x sidereal, but at .25x it may never get there before the next move command is issued. That compounds the problem and the axis could very well overshoot if the aggressiveness is set too high.

The reason the lower guide rates were ever considered goes back to the days of hand guiding where the user would try to keep a star on a crosshair. At 1x sidereal the mount moves rather quickly at 15 arc sec/sec. Many people do not have fast response, in fact some have eye - hand response rates of up to 2 seconds. So, the .25x rates were set to make guiding a bit less frantic for the manual guide user. Autoguiders have no such limitations. The CPs can be set up to guide at 12x sidereal and still work perfectly fine. In fact, that's how the mounts with absolute encoders do their magic, the guide rate is a variable depending on how far the mount must move during Dec reversal.

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Blahovici <tom.va2fsq@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Jun 5, 2021 12:48 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] Consequence of .5 guide on hand controller and 1x in software?

Hi
I have been guiding pretty well although at times, it seems to be erratic. I always though that this was seeing.
A recent thread mentioned guiding rates should be 1x in software and the hand controller. So I checked to be sure. Sure enough, the hand controller was set to 0.5x instead of 1x.
How will this effect guiding? I've had it like this for years, but have never been perfectly happy with the see saw RA graphs and the 100% agreesiveness needed for the Dec axis.
Any comments? Could this be a cause?
Thanks

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: ASCOM v2 driver #ASCOM_V2_Driver

George
 

George,

 

What is the button move speed set at?    You could be moving too slow to see.

 

Regards,

 

George

 

George Whitney

Astro-Physics, Inc.

Phone:  815-222-6538 (direct line)

Phone:  815-282-1513 (office)

Email:  george@...

 

From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of George Vlazny
Sent: Monday, June 7, 2021 12:37 AM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: [ap-gto] ASCOM v2 driver #ASCOM_V2_Driver

 

Hi all , 

I set up my Mach 1 last night for the first time since August last year , connection was fine but when I tithe N S E W buttons nothing happens. The mount was unpacked. Slewing to a target was no problem. The only thing changed since last year is that I am now using an Eagle 3 Pro.
for the record I’m 70 and a troglodyte, quite computer illiterate.
Any idea 
George


ASCOM v2 driver #ASCOM_V2_Driver

George Vlazny
 

Hi all , 

I set up my Mach 1 last night for the first time since August last year , connection was fine but when I tithe N S E W buttons nothing happens. The mount was unpacked. Slewing to a target was no problem. The only thing changed since last year is that I am now using an Eagle 3 Pro.
for the record I’m 70 and a troglodyte, quite computer illiterate.
Any idea 
George


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Consequence of .5 guide on hand controller and 1x in software?

Tom Blahovici
 

Hi
I have been guiding pretty well although at times, it seems to be erratic. I always though that this was seeing.
A recent thread mentioned guiding rates should be 1x in software and the hand controller. So I checked to be sure. Sure enough, the hand controller was set to 0.5x instead of 1x.
How will this effect guiding? I've had it like this for years, but have never been perfectly happy with the see saw RA graphs and the 100% agreesiveness needed for the Dec axis.
Any comments? Could this be a cause?
Thanks


Re: Can I recal from the ASCOM driver?

Peter Nagy
 

Not directly from ASCOM driver but you can use planetarium software that can control the mount via ASCOM. I can RCAL with Stellarium. 

Peter


Can I recal from the ASCOM driver?

Mike Dodd
 

With an equipment change, I might need to re-balance my AP1200. I've done this before, and am familiar with the procedure to balance in the Park 4 (or Park 1) position, then start up, slew to a star, center it with the keypad buttons, then do a Recal with the keypad.

Buy my keypad is disconnected and stored in the house. I'd rather not hook it up and go through the setup to change from EXT to auto-connect, then back to EXT afterward.

QUESTION: Can I do the Recal from the ASCOM driver window? I see the option to use Recal for Sync, and that's always been checked, but I see no "Recal Now" button.

If not in the ASCOM driver, I'm pretty sure I can use SkyX:
1. Slew to a star.
2. Use the driver's buttons to center the star.
3. Do a Sync in SkyX.

Since the driver is set to use Recal instead of Sync, everything is copacetic, correct?

Thanks for all information.

--- Mike


Re: Mach-1 capacity

Jeff B
 

Based upon my own experiences with my C14 and old AP 178 F9, for visual, the Mach 1 will be just fine with either scope.  Just don't mount both scopes together 😱

Jeff

On Sat, Jun 5, 2021 at 9:22 AM Mike Shade via groups.io <mshade=q.com@groups.io> wrote:

Thoughts about a C14 Edge on a Mach-1 for just visual poking around, NO imaging?  Same for a 160EDF, for just visual puttering?

 

Thanks

 

Mike J. Shade

Mike J. Shade Photography:

mshadephotography.com

 

In War: Resolution

In Defeat: Defiance

In Victory: Magnanimity

In Peace: Goodwill

Sir Winston Churchill

Already, in the gathering dusk, a few of the stars are turning on their lights.

Vega, the brightest one, is now dropping towards the west.  Can it be half

a year since I watched her April rising in the east?  Low in the southwest

Antares blinks a sad farwell to fall...

Leslie Peltier, Starlight Nights

 

International Dark Sky Association: www.darksky.org

 


Mach-1 capacity

Mike Shade
 

Thoughts about a C14 Edge on a Mach-1 for just visual poking around, NO imaging?  Same for a 160EDF, for just visual puttering?

 

Thanks

 

Mike J. Shade

Mike J. Shade Photography:

mshadephotography.com

 

In War: Resolution

In Defeat: Defiance

In Victory: Magnanimity

In Peace: Goodwill

Sir Winston Churchill

Already, in the gathering dusk, a few of the stars are turning on their lights.

Vega, the brightest one, is now dropping towards the west.  Can it be half

a year since I watched her April rising in the east?  Low in the southwest

Antares blinks a sad farwell to fall...

Leslie Peltier, Starlight Nights

 

International Dark Sky Association: www.darksky.org

 


Re: Will the Mach 2 support .....

Ted Mickle
 

Many thanks! - just the comprehensive answer I’m looking for.

Ted





On Jun 4, 2021, at 18:37, John Jennings <johnrogerjennings@...> wrote:



[Edited Message Follows]

Mike, Ted

If  you have not already, I would start reading Dr. Robin Glover's (SharpCap author) post in the SharpCap forums to get a basic idea about CCD vs CMOS. It's a little tedious but helpful.  SharpCap has a  built-in exposure calculator, but I have not used it since I still image with MaximDL for extended objects and galaxies.

https://forums.sharpcap.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=35&t=456

Understand that sub lengths really depend on your Sky Background Noise. There's no way to be specific without knowing that. Sky Noise is dependent on your sky brightness, camera pixel size & QE, filters and f ratio of your optics. But it's the same issue in dark vs the city skies.


I first use Dr. Glovers online Sky Background Noise calculator.

http://tools.sharpcap.co.uk/

I then use a spread sheet I made up that uses the basic calculation for all kinds of sky conditions and telescope/camera combos. The spread sheet is based on:

Sub Length= K(Read Noise Camera*2)/Sky Noise

Where K = Is a constant based on  the percent of noise acceptable in a stack of images  vs a single sub of total integration time.  As a shortcut I use K of 5% and it's 9.76. What you learn quickly is how sensitive low read noise cameras are to Sky Noise.  I use 1.5e Read Noise for my QHY268C & QHY410C because that's where I set the mode/gain/offset at.  The QHY600C is nearly the same as the QHY268C. The 600C is just a full frame version. The Read Noise can go as low as 1.1e for the 410C and the absolute QE can be over 80%.  Compare that to 9-10e for CCD sensors. Plug a few numbers in.

Also helpful is this link:


https://snrcalc.vercel.app/

I try to moderate the calculations with common sense because they can show some ridiculously short exposures.  


If  I'm doing a star field with any OSC CMOS camera and a good sky pollution filter, I never go over 30 seconds in my sky conditions.  I've gone up to 4 minutes on subs with the same broadband filter targeting extended objects, (no gradients)  but have not been satisfied because of the low contrast. In fact, I rarely image extended objects in the city with broadband filters because of my Bortle 8 skies.  They simply wash out.


I have been testing broadband filters (IDAS P3 and equivalents) on Galaxies with some initial success at about 2 minute subs because they are typically bright. Not sure where this leads.


With the OSC narrowband filters like LExtremePro, Radian and IDAS NBX you can treat sub lengths like narrowband even in the city.  I've exposed  8-10 minutes with decent results and contrast like the IC443 image I posted.


Please take my experiences and comments with a grain of salt. This is a pretty complex subject probably beyond my pay grade and I'm learning and testing all the time.


Re: Will the Mach 2 support .....

Roland Christen
 

No. You will need a Rainbow RST-135.

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: dvjbaja <jpgleasonid@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Jun 4, 2021 6:44 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Will the Mach 2 support .....

In context, I'm wondering if a Mach 2 will carry a Planewave 17"? LOL

On Fri, Jun 4, 2021 at 4:37 PM John Jennings <johnrogerjennings@...> wrote:
[Edited Message Follows]
Mike, Ted

If  you have not already, I would start reading Dr. Robin Glover's (SharpCap author) post in the SharpCap forums to get a basic idea about CCD vs CMOS. It's a little tedious but helpful.  SharpCap has a  built-in exposure calculator, but I have not used it since I still image with MaximDL for extended objects and galaxies.

https://forums.sharpcap.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=35&t=456

Understand that sub lengths really depend on your Sky Background Noise. There's no way to be specific without knowing that. Sky Noise is dependent on your sky brightness, camera pixel size & QE, filters and f ratio of your optics. But it's the same issue in dark vs the city skies.

I first use Dr. Glovers online Sky Background Noise calculator.

I then use a spread sheet I made up that uses the basic calculation for all kinds of sky conditions and telescope/camera combos. The spread sheet is based on:

Sub Length= K(Read Noise Camera*2)/Sky Noise

Where K = Is a constant based on  the percent of noise acceptable in a stack of images  vs a single sub of total integration time.  As a shortcut I use K of 5% and it's 9.76. What you learn quickly is how sensitive low read noise cameras are to Sky Noise.  I use 1.5e Read Noise for my QHY268C & QHY410C because that's where I set the mode/gain/offset at.  The QHY600C is nearly the same as the QHY268C. The 600C is just a full frame version. The Read Noise can go as low as 1.1e for the 410C and the absolute QE can be over 80%.  Compare that to 9-10e for CCD sensors. Plug a few numbers in.

Also helpful is this link:
I try to moderate the calculations with common sense because they can show some ridiculously short exposures.  

If  I'm doing a star field with any OSC CMOS camera and a good sky pollution filter, I never go over 30 seconds in my sky conditions.  I've gone up to 4 minutes on subs with the same broadband filter targeting extended objects, (no gradients)  but have not been satisfied because of the low contrast. In fact, I rarely image extended objects in the city with broadband filters because of my Bortle 8 skies.  They simply wash out.

I have been testing broadband filters (IDAS P3 and equivalents) on Galaxies with some initial success at about 2 minute subs because they are typically bright. Not sure where this leads.

With the OSC narrowband filters like LExtremePro, Radian and IDAS NBX you can treat sub lengths like narrowband even in the city.  I've exposed  8-10 minutes with decent results and contrast like the IC443 image I posted.

Please take my experiences and comments with a grain of salt. This is a pretty complex subject probably beyond my pay grade and I'm learning and testing all the time.

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: Will the Mach 2 support .....

dvjbaja
 

In context, I'm wondering if a Mach 2 will carry a Planewave 17"? LOL


On Fri, Jun 4, 2021 at 4:37 PM John Jennings <johnrogerjennings@...> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Mike, Ted

If  you have not already, I would start reading Dr. Robin Glover's (SharpCap author) post in the SharpCap forums to get a basic idea about CCD vs CMOS. It's a little tedious but helpful.  SharpCap has a  built-in exposure calculator, but I have not used it since I still image with MaximDL for extended objects and galaxies.

https://forums.sharpcap.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=35&t=456

Understand that sub lengths really depend on your Sky Background Noise. There's no way to be specific without knowing that. Sky Noise is dependent on your sky brightness, camera pixel size & QE, filters and f ratio of your optics. But it's the same issue in dark vs the city skies.


I first use Dr. Glovers online Sky Background Noise calculator.

http://tools.sharpcap.co.uk/

I then use a spread sheet I made up that uses the basic calculation for all kinds of sky conditions and telescope/camera combos. The spread sheet is based on:

Sub Length= K(Read Noise Camera*2)/Sky Noise

Where K = Is a constant based on  the percent of noise acceptable in a stack of images  vs a single sub of total integration time.  As a shortcut I use K of 5% and it's 9.76. What you learn quickly is how sensitive low read noise cameras are to Sky Noise.  I use 1.5e Read Noise for my QHY268C & QHY410C because that's where I set the mode/gain/offset at.  The QHY600C is nearly the same as the QHY268C. The 600C is just a full frame version. The Read Noise can go as low as 1.1e for the 410C and the absolute QE can be over 80%.  Compare that to 9-10e for CCD sensors. Plug a few numbers in.

Also helpful is this link:


https://snrcalc.vercel.app/

I try to moderate the calculations with common sense because they can show some ridiculously short exposures.  


If  I'm doing a star field with any OSC CMOS camera and a good sky pollution filter, I never go over 30 seconds in my sky conditions.  I've gone up to 4 minutes on subs with the same broadband filter targeting extended objects, (no gradients)  but have not been satisfied because of the low contrast. In fact, I rarely image extended objects in the city with broadband filters because of my Bortle 8 skies.  They simply wash out.


I have been testing broadband filters (IDAS P3 and equivalents) on Galaxies with some initial success at about 2 minute subs because they are typically bright. Not sure where this leads.


With the OSC narrowband filters like LExtremePro, Radian and IDAS NBX you can treat sub lengths like narrowband even in the city.  I've exposed  8-10 minutes with decent results and contrast like the IC443 image I posted.


Please take my experiences and comments with a grain of salt. This is a pretty complex subject probably beyond my pay grade and I'm learning and testing all the time.


Re: Will the Mach 2 support .....

John Jennings
 
Edited

Mike, Ted

If  you have not already, I would start reading Dr. Robin Glover's (SharpCap author) post in the SharpCap forums to get a basic idea about CCD vs CMOS. It's a little tedious but helpful.  SharpCap has a  built-in exposure calculator, but I have not used it since I still image with MaximDL for extended objects and galaxies.

https://forums.sharpcap.co.uk/viewtopic.php?f=35&t=456

Understand that sub lengths really depend on your Sky Background Noise. There's no way to be specific without knowing that. Sky Noise is dependent on your sky brightness, camera pixel size & QE, filters and f ratio of your optics. But it's the same issue in dark vs the city skies.


I first use Dr. Glovers online Sky Background Noise calculator.

http://tools.sharpcap.co.uk/

I then use a spread sheet I made up that uses the basic calculation for all kinds of sky conditions and telescope/camera combos. The spread sheet is based on:

Sub Length= K(Read Noise Camera*2)/Sky Noise

Where K = Is a constant based on  the percent of noise acceptable in a stack of images  vs a single sub of total integration time.  As a shortcut I use K of 5% and it's 9.76. What you learn quickly is how sensitive low read noise cameras are to Sky Noise.  I use 1.5e Read Noise for my QHY268C & QHY410C because that's where I set the mode/gain/offset at.  The QHY600C is nearly the same as the QHY268C. The 600C is just a full frame version. The Read Noise can go as low as 1.1e for the 410C and the absolute QE can be over 80%.  Compare that to 9-10e for CCD sensors. Plug a few numbers in.

Also helpful is this link:


https://snrcalc.vercel.app/

I try to moderate the calculations with common sense because they can show some ridiculously short exposures.  


If  I'm doing a star field with any OSC CMOS camera and a good sky pollution filter, I never go over 30 seconds in my sky conditions.  I've gone up to 4 minutes on subs with the same broadband filter targeting extended objects, (no gradients)  but have not been satisfied because of the low contrast. In fact, I rarely image extended objects in the city with broadband filters because of my Bortle 8 skies.  They simply wash out.


I have been testing broadband filters (IDAS P3 and equivalents) on Galaxies with some initial success at about 2 minute subs because they are typically bright. Not sure where this leads.


With the OSC narrowband filters like LExtremePro, Radian and IDAS NBX you can treat sub lengths like narrowband even in the city.  I've exposed  8-10 minutes with decent results and contrast like the IC443 image I posted.


Please take my experiences and comments with a grain of salt. This is a pretty complex subject probably beyond my pay grade and I'm learning and testing all the time.


Re: Will the Mach 2 support .....

Ted Mickle
 

In the context of this discussion, what would be a recommended way to calculate optimal exposure times for CMOS cameras like the QHY 600M, both for wide and narrowband?

Ted



On Jun 4, 2021, at 10:11, John Jennings <johnrogerjennings@...> wrote:



My perspective on color CMOS cameras is they have their own Genre like Spaghetti Westerns. (Good, Bad and Ugly fan) Trying to replicate narrow band images like a mono sensor with filters is problematic at best. As far a color saturation is concerned with broad band RGB images, I'm not sure about that. I do know that imaging with them took a rethink of my normal CCD imaging techniques. They gather data so fast, it's easy to start decreasing your signal to noise by exposing subs too long. In that case, long sub times may actually kill the image in brighter skies. And of course, there is the band passes of the Bayer Matrix filters to consider vs individual traditional RGB filters for mono camera.

You need to break up your integration time into a larger number of subs of shorter duration if you are broadband imaging. With narrow band OSC filters like the LeXtreme Pro (7nm band pass on Ha, OIII)  it doesn't matter very much.  Of course you need long integration times, but at the proper sub time. This of course is problematic with smaller pixel Cameras because the files are so large. But computers and SSD drivers are cheap, and new sensors like the IMX410 with 5.94U pixels give me hope that larger pixel CMOS sensors may eventually appear because they are optimum for commercial low light camera applications too. 

Just remember that short CMOS subs have the same information that a longer CCD subs have normally if all other variables are the same. I've been using a portable SQM meter with separate Red, Green, and Blue filters over the lens (simulating what the OSC sees) while stacking various OSC filters over them to take sky SQM readings. I then use that to determine optimal sub exposure time limits for my CMOS OSC. Of course there is a lot of wiggle room there too.  It's almost impossible for me to image with CMOS color cameras in Bortle 8 without some kind of light pollution filter. Sky fog can be an issue after 5 seconds easily causing washed out images. It's really amazing how much light pollution filters reduce the SQM readings of the bright city sky with great transmission. With my sky MPSAS of 17.87 (Bortle 8.1),  the sensor under the red filter of the OSC matrix and an IDAS D2 filter sees 20.52 MPSAS or Bortle 4.10.   Of course they filter out good colors too.


Re: AP3600 GTOCP 4

Roland Christen
 

We have not released any newer versions of the keypad for the CP4 controller yet.

Roland



-----Original Message-----
From: Konstantin von Poschinger <KPoschinger@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Jun 4, 2021 9:33 am
Subject: [ap-gto] AP3600 GTOCP 4

Hi Roland,

can you please tell me wich Firmware and software for the HP is the actual  in the moment. I would like to use the new HP version with the modeling. But as I think it is still not ready.

Grüsse

Konstantin


Konstantin v. Poschinger


Hammerichstr. 5
22605 Hamburg
040/8805747
0171/1983476






--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: AP3600 GTOCP 4

Roland Christen
 

The guys are working on it. I will check for you.

Roland


-----Original Message-----
From: Konstantin von Poschinger <KPoschinger@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Fri, Jun 4, 2021 9:33 am
Subject: [ap-gto] AP3600 GTOCP 4

Hi Roland,

can you please tell me wich Firmware and software for the HP is the actual  in the moment. I would like to use the new HP version with the modeling. But as I think it is still not ready.

Grüsse

Konstantin


Konstantin v. Poschinger


Hammerichstr. 5
22605 Hamburg
040/8805747
0171/1983476






--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: Will the Mach 2 support .....

Mike Dodd
 

On 6/4/2021 11:11 AM, John Jennings wrote:
You need to break up your integration time into a larger number of subs
of shorter duration if you are broadband imaging.
Does this apply to dark skies or only to bright skies? I remember you said you spent considerable time on the math, but I'm unclear on your conclusions.

I typically do 10-minute subs with my OSC camera, but now I'm wondering if I should reduce that. But then I wonder why. The background level is about the same with both exposures, and it seems to me that 2X the signal ought to improve the SNR.

I am very curious about this aspect of OSC imaging.

--- Mike


Re: Will the Mach 2 support .....

John Jennings
 
Edited

My perspective on color CMOS cameras is they have their own Genre like Spaghetti Westerns. (Good, Bad and Ugly fan) Trying to replicate narrow band images like a mono sensor with filters is problematic at best. As far a color saturation is concerned with broad band RGB images, I'm not sure about that. I do know that imaging with them took a rethink of my normal CCD imaging techniques. They gather data so fast, it's easy to start decreasing your signal to noise by exposing subs too long. In that case, long sub times may actually kill the image in brighter skies. And of course, there is the band passes of the Bayer Matrix filters to consider vs individual traditional RGB filters for mono camera.

You need to break up your integration time into a larger number of subs of shorter duration if you are broadband imaging. With narrow band OSC filters like the LeXtreme Pro (7nm band pass on Ha, OIII)  it doesn't matter very much.  Of course you need long integration times, but at the proper sub time. This of course is problematic with smaller pixel Cameras because the files are so large. But computers and SSD drivers are cheap, and new sensors like the IMX410 with 5.94U pixels give me hope that larger pixel CMOS sensors may eventually appear because they are optimum for commercial low light camera applications too. 

I've been using a portable SQM meter with separate Red, Green, and Blue filters over the lens (simulating what the OSC sees) while stacking various OSC filters over them to take sky SQM readings. I then use that to determine optimal sub exposure time limits for my CMOS OSC. Of course there is a lot of wiggle room there too.  It's almost impossible for me to image with CMOS color cameras in Bortle 8 without some kind of light pollution filter. Sky fog can be an issue after 5 seconds easily causing washed out images. It's really amazing how much light pollution filters reduce the SQM readings of the bright city sky with great transmission. With my sky MPSAS of 17.87 (Bortle 8.1),  the sensor under the red filter of the OSC matrix and an IDAS D2 filter sees 20.52 MPSAS or Bortle 4.10.   Of course they filter out good colors too.


AP3600 GTOCP 4

Konstantin von Poschinger
 

Hi Roland,

can you please tell me wich Firmware and software for the HP is the actual in the moment. I would like to use the new HP version with the modeling. But as I think it is still not ready.

Grüsse

Konstantin


Konstantin v. Poschinger


Hammerichstr. 5
22605 Hamburg
040/8805747
0171/1983476

3341 - 3360 of 82281