Date   

Re: Losing Communications with the Mount

Sébastien Doré
 

Ethernet is less reliable than USB because Ethernet and TCP use connectionless, multi-point protocols that make any device-to-device communications more vulnerable to disruption by a multitude more things
 
Not sure where you got that from... Communication link reliability has little to do with the underlying protocol granted it is used in the proper context, well managed and used within a properly designed "network" architecture. 
 
Also, TCP protocol IS a connection-based protocol. It is the very reason it is considered "more reliable" that UDP, the latter being a "best-effort" protocol with no handshake and less error-correction mechanisms but typically lower latency. Both have their usecases where they shine. USB and WiFi are no different either. Some are more complex to manage for a "standard" end-user than others, that's all. 
 
The way some manufacturers implement their datalink solution is another key factor. Don't expect Ferrari performance from a Chevy van. And don't drive a Ferrari when you've always driven a Chevy van (at least not without a proper training)...
 
That aside, OP seems to have isolated the problem between the mount and his wired computer. And I agree IP address conflict (connected devices with same address) could be the culprit here given the symptoms. In that case, I would expect communication to re-establish by itself over a few seconds/minutes wait (without powercycling the mount) and then fail again a few seconds/minutes later and re-establish, and so on. A test to verify that would be to run a "perpetual ping" (add "-t" to the usual ping syntax from the command line, e.g. ping X.X.X.X -t, where X.X.X.X is the mount's IP address) and let it run for several minutes. Hit CTRL+C to end the ping.
 
Wireshark isn't a tool for a "standard" end-user. From the OP's posts, I'd say he probably knows a bit about networking and probably already uses it. If not, I would rather suggest to download Advanced IP Scanner (free) or similar, which will help discover every device alive (responsive) and dead (not responsive for a small amount of time) on a network. It will also show the MAC address (which is a unique hardware network identifier) of all devices discovered. Try running a scan while the mount is responsive and take note of the MAC address associated with its IP address. Run it again when it becomes non-responsive and if the tool marks it as "alive" and shows a different MAC address, it means you indeed have a duplicate IP address in your network. The "Name" and "Manufacturer" listed will also help you identify which device is using the same IP address as the mount. If the device is marked "dead" when the mount is non-responsive, then the problem is probably elsewhere.
 

 
Another useful (a bit more advanced) command, if you are familiar with your network IP addressing, is the "tracert" command ("traceroute" in linux) which will essentialy show the path (routing hop) taken by a packet from the computer from which you entered the command to the destination device. Its usage is similar to the ping command, e.g. tracert X.X.X.X, where X is the mount's IP address (wired or wireless). Some routers/firewalls might block this request though and you only get a series of *** + a timeout message, instead of actual routing hop IP addresses, which won't help you much. If you have a "flat" network architechture or only one routing instance, it will only return the destination lP address which won't help you much either (see example below).
 

 
If it goes through however, it will help identify up to which routing network component (switch, router, access point, etc.) communication is achieved properly by returning a series of IP addresses through which packets need to go through to their destination, as well as the round-trip time between hops. Over modern wired ethernet links, expect values below 100ms. Over wireless links, it can go much higher depending on multiple factors, but I'd say below 150-200ms on average would be acceptable (but not particularly good). Over those figure, you possibly have a bottleneck somewhere or a failling network component. BTW that command can even be used over the internet with domain names. Example below is between my computer and google.ca. The last line shows the destination IP address of one of the servers hosting the domain google.ca. Lines 1-8 shows the routing instances every data packet has to come across to reach that google server from my computer.
 

 
 
Note that the fact that the mount is not responsive from either interfaces (Ethernet and WiFi) at the same time is also a clue the problem comes from a common source to both, hence probably not coming from the wireless Access Point.
 
Also worth mentionning, even if you haven't said you are using one, is firewalls (sorry, I'll get a bit technical here). While it is actually often not the firewall root-causing the problem, it can be the one ending the communication by dropping data packets. New generations of firewalls (even home router - WiFi or wired - with firewalls functionnalities) have dynamic adaptative algorithms that "recognize" the type and "behavior" of data traffic that goes through them. They do that to prevent, amongst other things, DoS (denial of service) attacks which consist of an attacker flooding a computer with a massive amount of requests until it crashes by running out of memory.

Now, I've monitored Ethernet/WiFi communications between APCC/APv2 ASCOM drivers and my mount's CP5 (using Wireshark) and based on the amount of connections (not talking about physical hardware connection here, rather software connections at the OSI model layer 4) used, it could well be mis-recognized by some firewall's algorithm as a DoS attack. I'm saying this because it creates a new connection for seemingly every data exchange between the computer and mount, which occurs very often - like every second or so. They possibly implemented this that way for heartbeat or synchronization purposes, but that's only a guess. (That left me scratching my head a bit BTW as there are more memory-efficient ways of accomplishing this). Anyway, thing to note here, is there is nothing you can do about that last part as it's an inherent p
roperty of AP's communication between controlling software and mount.
 
But if you are using such a next-gen firewall with that kind of security feature, it could result in similar symptoms to what you are experiencing: communications working for a while and then stopping entirely when packets are dropped. Note here that the firewall is simply doing its job of protecting you. I therefore wouldn't recommend disabling this security feature entirely to solve the problem if that proves to be the case. Rather, I'd try creating a rule to whitelist the mount's IP address in your firewall's configuration in that regard.

Hope this helps as well,
 
Sébastien


Re: Losing Communications with the Mount

Howard Hedlund
 

Using the supplied serial cable with a USB to serial converter, even the FTDI unit that we sell, will still be limited in its reliability to that of USB.  Chris is referring to a native serial port on a dedicated board inside the computer itself that avoids the Universal Serial Bus.  Our on-board USB port uses the same FTDI chipset, but it has an added advantage over an external USB to serial device.  An external device is powered solely from the bus in the computer.  Our port, however, is also powered so a power drop from the computer won't kill the USB connection because the CP4/5 will keep it alive.


Re: AP1100/CP4 and NINA

Michael 'Mikey' Mangieri
 

OK, thanks. I'll check out the 1.11 version and experiment tonight. I use
APCC and APPM.

My normal mode of operation is to slew to the east with CW UP (based on APCC
limits allowing this) and track past meridian with no need to flip. But
when I slew east with CW DOWN the flip needs to occur at the meridian. I
expect NINA to handle this without any additional inputs or configuration
from me.

If I ever need to track past meridian with CW UP I guess that's when NINA
needs to know when to flip? That's the part I would assume you are referring
to when you state that I need to configure NINA to execute flips prior to
those limits being reached?

Mikey

-----Original Message-----
From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dale Ghent
Sent: Thursday, May 6, 2021 12:54 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] AP1100/CP4 and NINA


Hi Michael, I'm one of the contributors to NINA and have been using my
Mach1GTO+CP3(V2) with it for over 2 years. It works fine. Plenty of other
uses use it with a CP4 and CP5 and that's also fine. It just uses the A-P
ASCOM driver like any other software.

Some general tips - If you have slew/tracking or meridian limits set up in
APCC then of course be sure that you configure NINA to execute flips prior
to those limits being reached. If you use the current in-development version
of NINA, 1.11, you can use the horizon file that APCC saves directly in
NINA's advanced sequencer to trigger actions based on your local horizon,
etc.


On May 6, 2021, at 12:38, Michael 'Mikey' Mangieri
<mjmangieri@xcalrockets.net> wrote:

I recently decided to try N.I.N.A. as a possible replacement for SGP which
I have used for years. Was wondering if the AP community has any issues
with using NINA with respect to meridian flips, CW-UP slews, and such?


Re: AP1100/CP4 and NINA

Dale Ghent
 

Hi Michael, I'm one of the contributors to NINA and have been using my Mach1GTO+CP3(V2) with it for over 2 years. It works fine. Plenty of other uses use it with a CP4 and CP5 and that's also fine. It just uses the A-P ASCOM driver like any other software.

Some general tips - If you have slew/tracking or meridian limits set up in APCC then of course be sure that you configure NINA to execute flips prior to those limits being reached. If you use the current in-development version of NINA, 1.11, you can use the horizon file that APCC saves directly in NINA's advanced sequencer to trigger actions based on your local horizon, etc.

On May 6, 2021, at 12:38, Michael 'Mikey' Mangieri <mjmangieri@xcalrockets.net> wrote:

I recently decided to try N.I.N.A. as a possible replacement for SGP which I have used for years. Was wondering if the AP community has any issues with using NINA with respect to meridian flips, CW-UP slews, and such?


Re: Connecting ASIAIR Pro to a CP4 - Mach1

Lee Decovnick
 

Could you expalin the sequence of setting that up with the ASI.  PhD2 is an old friend.


Re: Connecting ASIAIR Pro to a CP4 - Mach1

Lee Decovnick
 

Ok, thanks .I'll work on the USB to ASI AIR Pro connection. I'll check to  see If I have  an honest to goodness FIDI chip cable. I have an iPad, which I could use in place of the Windows emulation.


AP1100/CP4 and NINA

Michael 'Mikey' Mangieri
 

I recently decided to try N.I.N.A. as a possible replacement for SGP which I have used for years.  Was wondering if the AP community has any issues with using NINA with respect to meridian flips, CW-UP slews, and such?


Re: Losing Communications with the Mount

Donald Gaines
 

Hi Christopher,
My computer has no RS-232 (Serial I think) ports, just USB.  Would the 15’ serial cable that comes with the 1100GTO mount along with the Astro-Physics Serial to USB converter, provide the same performance and reliability as the RS-232 you mention below?
BTW, Observatory Engineer.....in Hawaii.....you must really enjoy going to work!
Thanks,
Don Gaines


On Thursday, May 6, 2021, Christopher Erickson <christopher.k.erickson@...> wrote:
TCP is more reliable than UDP if there are a bunch of lost packets on your network for some reason. Bad cable someplace, congestion, etc.In other words, TCP can hide a network problem that UDP does not. If UDP doesn't work, it is worthwhile trying to find out why and fixing it.

Also check your Ethernet cable lengths. Any cable over 100m can cause timeouts, retransmission congestion and packet loss.

Mixing different brands and vintages of Ethernet switches can sometimes cause problems. Different vintage Ethernet transceiver chips, different protocol capabilities, etc.

Get rid of any old Ethernet hubs.

Home made cables can have various issues due to bad crimps, crossed pairs, etc.

Check all cable connectors & sockets for oxidation, corrosion, bent pins, etc.

Make sure there is only one DHCP server on your network.

Always use Ethernet instead of WiFi, when you can.

The most robust and reliable mount communications option of all is RS-232 to a real serial port on your observatory computer. Second-best option is USB. Third is Ethernet and last place goes to WiFi. Ethernet is less reliable than USB because Ethernet and TCP use connectionless, multi-point protocols that make any device-to-device communications more vulnerable to disruption by a multitude more things. Also, most USB connectors are total, unreliable cr*p.

Wireshark is a free, open-source network diagnostic tool that can give you insights into your network. It is very powerful and does have a bit of a learning curve.

PingPlotter is a great, simple diagnostic tool that can be used to track down network congestion and packet loss in your network and your Internet connection.

Make sure you aren't suffering from duplicate IP addresses on your network. The WiFi and Ethernet ports MUST have different IP addresses from each other. Same goes for every single device port on your network.

If you have smart Ethernet switches that let you lock Ethernet ports to soecific, lower protocol speeds, try lowering them all to 10 or 100 MBPS and see if your network problems go away. Could be an auto-negotiation incompatibility issue between the switch and your CP4. Also if you have a smart switch, check its port statistics for clues.

I hope this helps.

-Christopher Erickson
Observatory engineer
Waikoloa, HI 96738
www.summitkinetics.com
   

On Wed, May 5, 2021, 2:35 PM Ray Gralak <iogroups@...> wrote:
> Also, the mount stops tracking when communications starts failing.
> If it was just a communications failure
> between the computer and the mount, wouldn’t the mount continue to track?

When APCC is in use, its Safety Park feature will cause the mount to stop tracking if the mount does not receive regular messages from APCC.

So, that the mount stopped tracking indicates that communication failed in some way.

-Ray


> -----Original Message-----
> From: main@ap-gto.groups.io [mailto:main@ap-gto.groups.io] On Behalf Of alex
> Sent: Wednesday, May 5, 2021 3:41 PM
> To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Losing Communications with the Mount
>
> I had already upped the timeout to 200ms, so I’ll try 400ms.  The mount is directly connected to a switch in my
> observatory.  The only other thing plugged into that switch is my UniFi WiFi access point, which is mounted in
> the observatory.  My computer (a piggy backed eagle 2) is the only thing using that access point, so
> communications is Eagle2 -> AP -> Switch -> Mount.  Said switch is backhauled to my house’s main switch,
> and the only traffic between the house and the observatory is my Mac connecting to the Eagle2 using Microsoft
> Remote Desktop. The Remote Desktop connection to the eagle has been rock solid.
>
> I had pings repeating from my wired Mac in the house, and when the problem happens, the pings start failing
> and stay failing until the mount is power cycled, at which point the pings start working again. APCC re-
> establishes communications once the mount is power cycled with no other intervention on my part.
>
> Also, the mount stops tracking when communications starts failing.  If it was just a communications failure
> between the computer and the mount, wouldn’t the mount continue to track?
> Communications failed again as I was writing this response.  The mount was parked at the time.  I had bumped
> the timeout to 400ms and switched to UDP before hand.  Pings to the mount’s hard wired ethernet IP address
> is failing, but curiously I can ping the mount’s WiFi IP address, though if I disconnect from the mount in APCC
> and try connecting it via that WiFi address, it still get’s no response from the mount.  Again, a few seconds after
> power cycling the GTOCP4, everything is working again.
>
> I’ll try snaking a USB cable down from the Eagle 2 to the mount and try that as backup or perhaps the primary.
> If that also fails, then I’ll pop open the GTOCP4 and check the daughter board seating.
>
> Alex
>
>







Re: Losing Communications with the Mount

 

All good advice from Christopher. Adding on to this,

 

Try increasing your timeout even more. 400ms is high for serial, and is fine for just ethernet on it’s own, but can be on the low side for wifi connections. Additionally, can you send us a picture of the setup? Sometimes a problem might not be obvious from the description alone. After that, checking all of your cables, even the power for the ethernet switch, is a good thing to do.

 

Liam

 

From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of Christopher Erickson
Sent: Thursday, May 6, 2021 1:27 AM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Losing Communications with the Mount

 

TCP is more reliable than UDP if there are a bunch of lost packets on your network for some reason. Bad cable someplace, congestion, etc.In other words, TCP can hide a network problem that UDP does not. If UDP doesn't work, it is worthwhile trying to find out why and fixing it.

 

Also check your Ethernet cable lengths. Any cable over 100m can cause timeouts, retransmission congestion and packet loss.

 

Mixing different brands and vintages of Ethernet switches can sometimes cause problems. Different vintage Ethernet transceiver chips, different protocol capabilities, etc.

 

Get rid of any old Ethernet hubs.

 

Home made cables can have various issues due to bad crimps, crossed pairs, etc.

 

Check all cable connectors & sockets for oxidation, corrosion, bent pins, etc.

 

Make sure there is only one DHCP server on your network.

Always use Ethernet instead of WiFi, when you can.

 

The most robust and reliable mount communications option of all is RS-232 to a real serial port on your observatory computer. Second-best option is USB. Third is Ethernet and last place goes to WiFi. Ethernet is less reliable than USB because Ethernet and TCP use connectionless, multi-point protocols that make any device-to-device communications more vulnerable to disruption by a multitude more things. Also, most USB connectors are total, unreliable cr*p.

 

Wireshark is a free, open-source network diagnostic tool that can give you insights into your network. It is very powerful and does have a bit of a learning curve.

 

PingPlotter is a great, simple diagnostic tool that can be used to track down network congestion and packet loss in your network and your Internet connection.

 

Make sure you aren't suffering from duplicate IP addresses on your network. The WiFi and Ethernet ports MUST have different IP addresses from each other. Same goes for every single device port on your network.

 

If you have smart Ethernet switches that let you lock Ethernet ports to soecific, lower protocol speeds, try lowering them all to 10 or 100 MBPS and see if your network problems go away. Could be an auto-negotiation incompatibility issue between the switch and your CP4. Also if you have a smart switch, check its port statistics for clues.

 

I hope this helps.


-Christopher Erickson
Observatory engineer
Waikoloa, HI 96738
www.summitkinetics.com
   

 

On Wed, May 5, 2021, 2:35 PM Ray Gralak <iogroups@...> wrote:

> Also, the mount stops tracking when communications starts failing.
> If it was just a communications failure
> between the computer and the mount, wouldn’t the mount continue to track?

When APCC is in use, its Safety Park feature will cause the mount to stop tracking if the mount does not receive regular messages from APCC.

So, that the mount stopped tracking indicates that communication failed in some way.

-Ray


> -----Original Message-----
> From: main@ap-gto.groups.io [mailto:main@ap-gto.groups.io] On Behalf Of alex
> Sent: Wednesday, May 5, 2021 3:41 PM
> To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Losing Communications with the Mount
>
> I had already upped the timeout to 200ms, so I’ll try 400ms.  The mount is directly connected to a switch in my
> observatory.  The only other thing plugged into that switch is my UniFi WiFi access point, which is mounted in
> the observatory.  My computer (a piggy backed eagle 2) is the only thing using that access point, so
> communications is Eagle2 -> AP -> Switch -> Mount.  Said switch is backhauled to my house’s main switch,
> and the only traffic between the house and the observatory is my Mac connecting to the Eagle2 using Microsoft
> Remote Desktop. The Remote Desktop connection to the eagle has been rock solid.
>
> I had pings repeating from my wired Mac in the house, and when the problem happens, the pings start failing
> and stay failing until the mount is power cycled, at which point the pings start working again. APCC re-
> establishes communications once the mount is power cycled with no other intervention on my part.
>
> Also, the mount stops tracking when communications starts failing.  If it was just a communications failure
> between the computer and the mount, wouldn’t the mount continue to track?
> Communications failed again as I was writing this response.  The mount was parked at the time.  I had bumped
> the timeout to 400ms and switched to UDP before hand.  Pings to the mount’s hard wired ethernet IP address
> is failing, but curiously I can ping the mount’s WiFi IP address, though if I disconnect from the mount in APCC
> and try connecting it via that WiFi address, it still get’s no response from the mount.  Again, a few seconds after
> power cycling the GTOCP4, everything is working again.
>
> I’ll try snaking a USB cable down from the Eagle 2 to the mount and try that as backup or perhaps the primary.
> If that also fails, then I’ll pop open the GTOCP4 and check the daughter board seating.
>
> Alex
>
>






Re: AP1600 w/AE manual #Absolute_Encoders

Dhaval
 

Thanks George! I shouldn't even have bothered!! Thanks for keeping it simple.

Dhaval


Re: Losing Communications with the Mount

Christopher Erickson
 

TCP is more reliable than UDP if there are a bunch of lost packets on your network for some reason. Bad cable someplace, congestion, etc.In other words, TCP can hide a network problem that UDP does not. If UDP doesn't work, it is worthwhile trying to find out why and fixing it.

Also check your Ethernet cable lengths. Any cable over 100m can cause timeouts, retransmission congestion and packet loss.

Mixing different brands and vintages of Ethernet switches can sometimes cause problems. Different vintage Ethernet transceiver chips, different protocol capabilities, etc.

Get rid of any old Ethernet hubs.

Home made cables can have various issues due to bad crimps, crossed pairs, etc.

Check all cable connectors & sockets for oxidation, corrosion, bent pins, etc.

Make sure there is only one DHCP server on your network.

Always use Ethernet instead of WiFi, when you can.

The most robust and reliable mount communications option of all is RS-232 to a real serial port on your observatory computer. Second-best option is USB. Third is Ethernet and last place goes to WiFi. Ethernet is less reliable than USB because Ethernet and TCP use connectionless, multi-point protocols that make any device-to-device communications more vulnerable to disruption by a multitude more things. Also, most USB connectors are total, unreliable cr*p.

Wireshark is a free, open-source network diagnostic tool that can give you insights into your network. It is very powerful and does have a bit of a learning curve.

PingPlotter is a great, simple diagnostic tool that can be used to track down network congestion and packet loss in your network and your Internet connection.

Make sure you aren't suffering from duplicate IP addresses on your network. The WiFi and Ethernet ports MUST have different IP addresses from each other. Same goes for every single device port on your network.

If you have smart Ethernet switches that let you lock Ethernet ports to soecific, lower protocol speeds, try lowering them all to 10 or 100 MBPS and see if your network problems go away. Could be an auto-negotiation incompatibility issue between the switch and your CP4. Also if you have a smart switch, check its port statistics for clues.

I hope this helps.

-Christopher Erickson
Observatory engineer
Waikoloa, HI 96738
www.summitkinetics.com
   


On Wed, May 5, 2021, 2:35 PM Ray Gralak <iogroups@...> wrote:
> Also, the mount stops tracking when communications starts failing.
> If it was just a communications failure
> between the computer and the mount, wouldn’t the mount continue to track?

When APCC is in use, its Safety Park feature will cause the mount to stop tracking if the mount does not receive regular messages from APCC.

So, that the mount stopped tracking indicates that communication failed in some way.

-Ray


> -----Original Message-----
> From: main@ap-gto.groups.io [mailto:main@ap-gto.groups.io] On Behalf Of alex
> Sent: Wednesday, May 5, 2021 3:41 PM
> To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Losing Communications with the Mount
>
> I had already upped the timeout to 200ms, so I’ll try 400ms.  The mount is directly connected to a switch in my
> observatory.  The only other thing plugged into that switch is my UniFi WiFi access point, which is mounted in
> the observatory.  My computer (a piggy backed eagle 2) is the only thing using that access point, so
> communications is Eagle2 -> AP -> Switch -> Mount.  Said switch is backhauled to my house’s main switch,
> and the only traffic between the house and the observatory is my Mac connecting to the Eagle2 using Microsoft
> Remote Desktop. The Remote Desktop connection to the eagle has been rock solid.
>
> I had pings repeating from my wired Mac in the house, and when the problem happens, the pings start failing
> and stay failing until the mount is power cycled, at which point the pings start working again. APCC re-
> establishes communications once the mount is power cycled with no other intervention on my part.
>
> Also, the mount stops tracking when communications starts failing.  If it was just a communications failure
> between the computer and the mount, wouldn’t the mount continue to track?
> Communications failed again as I was writing this response.  The mount was parked at the time.  I had bumped
> the timeout to 400ms and switched to UDP before hand.  Pings to the mount’s hard wired ethernet IP address
> is failing, but curiously I can ping the mount’s WiFi IP address, though if I disconnect from the mount in APCC
> and try connecting it via that WiFi address, it still get’s no response from the mount.  Again, a few seconds after
> power cycling the GTOCP4, everything is working again.
>
> I’ll try snaking a USB cable down from the Eagle 2 to the mount and try that as backup or perhaps the primary.
> If that also fails, then I’ll pop open the GTOCP4 and check the daughter board seating.
>
> Alex
>
>







Re: 1100GTO PEC question

Pete Mumbower
 

Good to know Rolando! This mount is truly amazing, guiding and point really are fading into the background and now the OTA/camera/and seeing are becoming my new problems!

Cheers,
Pete


Re: 1100GTO PEC question

Roland Christen
 

When you disconnect the worm gear, you are not changing the worm position in the gearbox. So, no problem. PE curve will stay synchronized to the worm angle. You can move the main worm wheel around to any position that you like and engage the worm gear in that new position. It does not affect the PE curve.

Rolando

-----Original Message-----
From: Pete Mumbower <pmumbower@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Wed, May 5, 2021 9:17 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] 1100GTO PEC question

HI everyone,

Quick newbie question about the PEC on my new 1100GTO mount. If I use the lever to quickly disengage the RA/DEC for balancing the mount, does that effect the PEC at all? I tried to disengaged and reengaged both axis on the hash marks, but does the PEC know where the the worm is in relation to the worm wheel or does that not really matter a whole lot on these precision mounts?

Thanks!
Pete

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


1100GTO PEC question

Pete Mumbower
 

HI everyone,

Quick newbie question about the PEC on my new 1100GTO mount. If I use the lever to quickly disengage the RA/DEC for balancing the mount, does that effect the PEC at all? I tried to disengaged and reengaged both axis on the hash marks, but does the PEC know where the the worm is in relation to the worm wheel or does that not really matter a whole lot on these precision mounts?

Thanks!
Pete


Re: Losing Communications with the Mount

Ray Gralak
 

Also, the mount stops tracking when communications starts failing.
If it was just a communications failure
between the computer and the mount, wouldn’t the mount continue to track?
When APCC is in use, its Safety Park feature will cause the mount to stop tracking if the mount does not receive regular messages from APCC.

So, that the mount stopped tracking indicates that communication failed in some way.

-Ray


-----Original Message-----
From: main@ap-gto.groups.io [mailto:main@ap-gto.groups.io] On Behalf Of alex
Sent: Wednesday, May 5, 2021 3:41 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Losing Communications with the Mount

I had already upped the timeout to 200ms, so I’ll try 400ms. The mount is directly connected to a switch in my
observatory. The only other thing plugged into that switch is my UniFi WiFi access point, which is mounted in
the observatory. My computer (a piggy backed eagle 2) is the only thing using that access point, so
communications is Eagle2 -> AP -> Switch -> Mount. Said switch is backhauled to my house’s main switch,
and the only traffic between the house and the observatory is my Mac connecting to the Eagle2 using Microsoft
Remote Desktop. The Remote Desktop connection to the eagle has been rock solid.

I had pings repeating from my wired Mac in the house, and when the problem happens, the pings start failing
and stay failing until the mount is power cycled, at which point the pings start working again. APCC re-
establishes communications once the mount is power cycled with no other intervention on my part.

Also, the mount stops tracking when communications starts failing. If it was just a communications failure
between the computer and the mount, wouldn’t the mount continue to track?
Communications failed again as I was writing this response. The mount was parked at the time. I had bumped
the timeout to 400ms and switched to UDP before hand. Pings to the mount’s hard wired ethernet IP address
is failing, but curiously I can ping the mount’s WiFi IP address, though if I disconnect from the mount in APCC
and try connecting it via that WiFi address, it still get’s no response from the mount. Again, a few seconds after
power cycling the GTOCP4, everything is working again.

I’ll try snaking a USB cable down from the Eagle 2 to the mount and try that as backup or perhaps the primary.
If that also fails, then I’ll pop open the GTOCP4 and check the daughter board seating.

Alex


Re: Losing Communications with the Mount

 

Hi Alex

in my experience TCP is a more reliable protocol than UDP

i had similar timeout issues, switched to TCP and it was resolved for me

On Wed, May 5, 2021 at 3:40 PM alex <groups@...> wrote:
I had already upped the timeout to 200ms, so I’ll try 400ms.  The mount is directly connected to a switch in my observatory.  The only other thing plugged into that switch is my UniFi WiFi access point, which is mounted in the observatory.  My computer (a piggy backed eagle 2) is the only thing using that access point, so communications is Eagle2 -> AP -> Switch -> Mount.  Said switch is backhauled to my house’s main switch, and the only traffic between the house and the observatory is my Mac connecting to the Eagle2 using Microsoft Remote Desktop. The Remote Desktop connection to the eagle has been rock solid.
 
I had pings repeating from my wired Mac in the house, and when the problem happens, the pings start failing and stay failing until the mount is power cycled, at which point the pings start working again. APCC re-establishes communications once the mount is power cycled with no other intervention on my part.
 
Also, the mount stops tracking when communications starts failing.  If it was just a communications failure between the computer and the mount, wouldn’t the mount continue to track?  When the mount is in this mode, the GTOCP4’s power light is on and the ethernet activity lights continue to flicker.
 
Communications failed again as I was writing this response.  The mount was parked at the time.  I had bumped the timeout to 400ms and switched to UDP before hand.  Pings to the mount’s hard wired ethernet IP address is failing, but curiously I can ping the mount’s WiFi IP address, though if I disconnect from the mount in APCC and try connecting it via that WiFi address, it still get’s no response from the mount.  Again, a few seconds after power cycling the GTOCP4, everything is working again.
 
I’ll try snaking a USB cable down from the Eagle 2 to the mount and try that as backup or perhaps the primary.  If that also fails, then I’ll pop open the GTOCP4 and check the daughter board seating.
 
Alex
 



--
Brian 



Brian Valente


Re: Losing Communications with the Mount

Alex
 

I had already upped the timeout to 200ms, so I’ll try 400ms.  The mount is directly connected to a switch in my observatory.  The only other thing plugged into that switch is my UniFi WiFi access point, which is mounted in the observatory.  My computer (a piggy backed eagle 2) is the only thing using that access point, so communications is Eagle2 -> AP -> Switch -> Mount.  Said switch is backhauled to my house’s main switch, and the only traffic between the house and the observatory is my Mac connecting to the Eagle2 using Microsoft Remote Desktop. The Remote Desktop connection to the eagle has been rock solid.
 
I had pings repeating from my wired Mac in the house, and when the problem happens, the pings start failing and stay failing until the mount is power cycled, at which point the pings start working again. APCC re-establishes communications once the mount is power cycled with no other intervention on my part.
 
Also, the mount stops tracking when communications starts failing.  If it was just a communications failure between the computer and the mount, wouldn’t the mount continue to track?  When the mount is in this mode, the GTOCP4’s power light is on and the ethernet activity lights continue to flicker.
 
Communications failed again as I was writing this response.  The mount was parked at the time.  I had bumped the timeout to 400ms and switched to UDP before hand.  Pings to the mount’s hard wired ethernet IP address is failing, but curiously I can ping the mount’s WiFi IP address, though if I disconnect from the mount in APCC and try connecting it via that WiFi address, it still get’s no response from the mount.  Again, a few seconds after power cycling the GTOCP4, everything is working again.
 
I’ll try snaking a USB cable down from the Eagle 2 to the mount and try that as backup or perhaps the primary.  If that also fails, then I’ll pop open the GTOCP4 and check the daughter board seating.
 
Alex
 


Re: MGBox V2 Driver

Keith Olsen
 

You are correct Brian.  I got a response from Matt at Astromi and he said the ASCOM driver is the same for all MGBox models.   

I did find my problem.  I had somehow downloaded an old version of the MGBox Windows Application so I could not change from Serial to ASCOM connection.  Once I downloaded the correct version I was able to change to an ASCOM connection and all works great now.

FYI, I can have both the MGBox Windows Application running and APCC at the same time with no problem.  I can start either one first it doesn't matter.


Re: Connecting ASIAIR Pro to a CP4 - Mach1

Arvind
 

I have successfully used the CP4 with ASIAIR Pro a few nights in the past, and have gone through polar alignment, GoTo, guiding, etc without any issues.

Use the USB port from ASIAIR Pro <-> CP4.

I don't know if the laptop/iPad makes any difference since the software is eventually running on the raspberry pi. The client software is purely for display.


On Wed, May 5, 2021 at 7:29 AM Lee Decovnick <ursa@...> wrote:
Hi all,

This is my first post, though I’ve been a long time Mach 1 (CP3) owner and I just bought a second used Mach 1 (CP4) for my wife. We shoot astrophotography two weeks a year on the Modoc Plateau, 50 miles east of Mt. Shasta.

The ASI Air Pro mount interfaces is pretty basic, which is fine as she moves up from shooting the Milky Way with a DSLR into using the ASI CMOS cameras.
So far I have had tried Ethernet and USB and Wi-Fi to talk to the ASI Air Pro, nothing.  I can see the GTO WiFi network ,but no handshake with the ASI.  But I loaded the FIDI driver and at 9600 baud, the RS232 serial port does connect, but drops out often.

I’m running the ASIAIR Pro App on a Windows 10 machine ( larger screen) - rather than an iPad - using Blue Stacks emulation..a pretty nifty set up. I do not have APCC loaded on my Window machine, do I need to do so?

Am I aiming for a bridge too far? I’m accustomed to simply shooting  astrophotography just using my hand controller for the GOTO’s and I have no tracking problems with 2-3 minutes subs without PremPro. I polar align in the field with a RAPAS. Easy-peasy.

Suggestions and comments welcome.

Lee
Walnut Creek,Ca





Re: MGBox V2 Driver

 

I am fairly certain it is the same driver and app



On Wed, May 5, 2021 at 11:49 AM Keith Olsen <keitholsen@...> wrote:
Hi Brian thanks for responding,

I see the V2 Firmware but I don't see the V2 ASCOM driver, I only see what appears to be the MGBox Ascom Driver(not V2).  I did download and install it but it does not work with the V2 box.   In the selection box for the driver in APCC it only shows the MGBox driver(not V2) and pressing the Test button shows bad data.

Keith



--
Brian 



Brian Valente

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