Date   

Re: M 81

Roland Christen
 

Not bad at all. I always say "If it's up, image it!"

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: KHursh via groups.io <khursh@...>
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Sent: Sat, Apr 17, 2021 9:54 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] M 81

I know this is an oft-imaged galaxy, but it is one of the first images I am proud of.
Image processing is challenging, but capture is a breeze with the Mach2.
Sky-watcher 120 with ASI294MM,

https://astrob.in/kxm7yk/0/

Kevin

--
Roland Christen
Astro-Physics


Re: Powering Remote Imaging Systems

Luca Marinelli
 

I forgot to paste the link:

Kingdel Fanless Mini Desktop Computer, Mini PC with Intel i7 CPU, 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD, 2xHD Ports, 2xLAN, All Metal Body, Windows 10 Pro https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01AWB2GWG/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_4Q2DM3XKMQV0SWGAFHBF

On Apr 18, 2021, at 12:46 PM, Luca Marinelli via groups.io <photo=lucamarinelli.com@groups.io> wrote:

I have two of these Kingdel fanless Core i7 headless PC running in my observatory and they have been flawless. The oldest one has been in operation for two years with no downtime and has controlled an imaging system and observatory operations down to -15F without missing a beat.

Luca

On Apr 18, 2021, at 11:19 AM, Steve Reilly via groups.io <sreilly24590=centurylink.net@groups.io> wrote:

Thanks for the reply Dale. I probably should replace at least the SRO computer. Any particular brand or vendor you can recommend for getting these? Hopefully they can be well configured which is what I think kept me from using these early on.

-Steve


-----Original Message-----
From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dale Ghent
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 11:08 AM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Powering Remote Imaging Systems


I wouldn't worry about computers needing a "rest" unless you have power availability considerations that would necessitate a complete shutdown of everything during idle periods. Computers are pretty resilient things. You can get fanless systems with SSDs and be completely free of any moving parts that could wear out from long periods of running. It's far better to have a fanless system that is designed to be fanless, than one that relies on a fan for cooling and is in trouble if that fan breaks or gets clogged up with the kind of dust and gunk that often floats around inside observatories.

I don't know what your current in-observatory system is, but I would just opt for a low power system instead of trying to come up with some power management/synchronization machination for a single remote PC. Something NUC-ish is suitable for almost any observatory's control and acquisition system. You can find small systems with 15W TDP Intel i3 or i5 CPUs that sip power are completely adequate for the task.

You can have it do stuff during the daytime, too. Run a weather station, monitor inside temperature/humidity sensors, or an all-sky or security cameras, for example.


On Apr 18, 2021, at 08:17, Steve Reilly <sreilly24590@centurylink.net> wrote:
While not directly mount related it does concern powering systems. For a system I run at SRO and one at home I have Web Power switches for the scripting the powering of equipment on/off through ACP Expert which works great but now years after just leaving the computers on 24/7 forever I wonder about the intelligence of that practice. I do have the computer’s BIOS set to restore to previous state should there be a power loss so that it turns back on and in turn opens the programs I have in the Start Menu which is fine for emergencies but I suspect I wouldn’t want to force stop/start it like that on a regular basis if not necessary. I’ve read a bit about Wake On LAN but that requires a computer that is on that network to access the computer you want woken which in this case is doable even with SRO as they have a VPN that sets the remote computer as part of your local network. I can Remote Desktop into that system using the IP address from home when the VPN is connected.

But of course I’m looking for more fool proofing such as not relaying on memory to connect and turn on each system every day as that will most certainly be forgotten from time to time and likely on the very best of nights. So the real question hidden deep in this post is if anyone knows of a mostly foolproof method to have remote computers turn on and off at predetermined times. I would expect you’d want to calculate the earliest time for On in your area considering DST and off by the latest morning time. Say you may want 4PM start for the winter when you could be imaging by 5:30pm in some areas and off at 9am in the morning which would/should allow time for sky flats should you take them both evening and morning. This at least gives the computer a rest of 15+ hours a day and in my case where I use a Starlight Xpress UltraStar guider t to would be powered down as it’s always on when connected to the computer’s USB.

Just think there should be a more reasonable way to run these system that would be easier on the computers as well as being more efficient. Anything obvious I’m missing? Suggestions?













Re: Powering Remote Imaging Systems

Luca Marinelli
 

I have two of these Kingdel fanless Core i7 headless PC running in my observatory and they have been flawless. The oldest one has been in operation for two years with no downtime and has controlled an imaging system and observatory operations down to -15F without missing a beat.

Luca

On Apr 18, 2021, at 11:19 AM, Steve Reilly via groups.io <sreilly24590=centurylink.net@groups.io> wrote:

Thanks for the reply Dale. I probably should replace at least the SRO computer. Any particular brand or vendor you can recommend for getting these? Hopefully they can be well configured which is what I think kept me from using these early on.

-Steve


-----Original Message-----
From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dale Ghent
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 11:08 AM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Powering Remote Imaging Systems


I wouldn't worry about computers needing a "rest" unless you have power availability considerations that would necessitate a complete shutdown of everything during idle periods. Computers are pretty resilient things. You can get fanless systems with SSDs and be completely free of any moving parts that could wear out from long periods of running. It's far better to have a fanless system that is designed to be fanless, than one that relies on a fan for cooling and is in trouble if that fan breaks or gets clogged up with the kind of dust and gunk that often floats around inside observatories.

I don't know what your current in-observatory system is, but I would just opt for a low power system instead of trying to come up with some power management/synchronization machination for a single remote PC. Something NUC-ish is suitable for almost any observatory's control and acquisition system. You can find small systems with 15W TDP Intel i3 or i5 CPUs that sip power are completely adequate for the task.

You can have it do stuff during the daytime, too. Run a weather station, monitor inside temperature/humidity sensors, or an all-sky or security cameras, for example.


On Apr 18, 2021, at 08:17, Steve Reilly <sreilly24590@centurylink.net> wrote:

While not directly mount related it does concern powering systems. For a system I run at SRO and one at home I have Web Power switches for the scripting the powering of equipment on/off through ACP Expert which works great but now years after just leaving the computers on 24/7 forever I wonder about the intelligence of that practice. I do have the computer’s BIOS set to restore to previous state should there be a power loss so that it turns back on and in turn opens the programs I have in the Start Menu which is fine for emergencies but I suspect I wouldn’t want to force stop/start it like that on a regular basis if not necessary. I’ve read a bit about Wake On LAN but that requires a computer that is on that network to access the computer you want woken which in this case is doable even with SRO as they have a VPN that sets the remote computer as part of your local network. I can Remote Desktop into that system using the IP address from home when the VPN is connected.

But of course I’m looking for more fool proofing such as not relaying on memory to connect and turn on each system every day as that will most certainly be forgotten from time to time and likely on the very best of nights. So the real question hidden deep in this post is if anyone knows of a mostly foolproof method to have remote computers turn on and off at predetermined times. I would expect you’d want to calculate the earliest time for On in your area considering DST and off by the latest morning time. Say you may want 4PM start for the winter when you could be imaging by 5:30pm in some areas and off at 9am in the morning which would/should allow time for sky flats should you take them both evening and morning. This at least gives the computer a rest of 15+ hours a day and in my case where I use a Starlight Xpress UltraStar guider t to would be powered down as it’s always on when connected to the computer’s USB.

Just think there should be a more reasonable way to run these system that would be easier on the computers as well as being more efficient. Anything obvious I’m missing? Suggestions?










Re: Powering Remote Imaging Systems

Steve Reilly
 

Thanks for the reply Dale. I probably should replace at least the SRO computer. Any particular brand or vendor you can recommend for getting these? Hopefully they can be well configured which is what I think kept me from using these early on.

-Steve

-----Original Message-----
From: main@ap-gto.groups.io <main@ap-gto.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dale Ghent
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 11:08 AM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Powering Remote Imaging Systems


I wouldn't worry about computers needing a "rest" unless you have power availability considerations that would necessitate a complete shutdown of everything during idle periods. Computers are pretty resilient things. You can get fanless systems with SSDs and be completely free of any moving parts that could wear out from long periods of running. It's far better to have a fanless system that is designed to be fanless, than one that relies on a fan for cooling and is in trouble if that fan breaks or gets clogged up with the kind of dust and gunk that often floats around inside observatories.

I don't know what your current in-observatory system is, but I would just opt for a low power system instead of trying to come up with some power management/synchronization machination for a single remote PC. Something NUC-ish is suitable for almost any observatory's control and acquisition system. You can find small systems with 15W TDP Intel i3 or i5 CPUs that sip power are completely adequate for the task.

You can have it do stuff during the daytime, too. Run a weather station, monitor inside temperature/humidity sensors, or an all-sky or security cameras, for example.


On Apr 18, 2021, at 08:17, Steve Reilly <sreilly24590@centurylink.net> wrote:

While not directly mount related it does concern powering systems. For a system I run at SRO and one at home I have Web Power switches for the scripting the powering of equipment on/off through ACP Expert which works great but now years after just leaving the computers on 24/7 forever I wonder about the intelligence of that practice. I do have the computer’s BIOS set to restore to previous state should there be a power loss so that it turns back on and in turn opens the programs I have in the Start Menu which is fine for emergencies but I suspect I wouldn’t want to force stop/start it like that on a regular basis if not necessary. I’ve read a bit about Wake On LAN but that requires a computer that is on that network to access the computer you want woken which in this case is doable even with SRO as they have a VPN that sets the remote computer as part of your local network. I can Remote Desktop into that system using the IP address from home when the VPN is connected.

But of course I’m looking for more fool proofing such as not relaying on memory to connect and turn on each system every day as that will most certainly be forgotten from time to time and likely on the very best of nights. So the real question hidden deep in this post is if anyone knows of a mostly foolproof method to have remote computers turn on and off at predetermined times. I would expect you’d want to calculate the earliest time for On in your area considering DST and off by the latest morning time. Say you may want 4PM start for the winter when you could be imaging by 5:30pm in some areas and off at 9am in the morning which would/should allow time for sky flats should you take them both evening and morning. This at least gives the computer a rest of 15+ hours a day and in my case where I use a Starlight Xpress UltraStar guider t to would be powered down as it’s always on when connected to the computer’s USB.

Just think there should be a more reasonable way to run these system that would be easier on the computers as well as being more efficient. Anything obvious I’m missing? Suggestions?


Re: Powering Remote Imaging Systems

Dale Ghent
 

I wouldn't worry about computers needing a "rest" unless you have power availability considerations that would necessitate a complete shutdown of everything during idle periods. Computers are pretty resilient things. You can get fanless systems with SSDs and be completely free of any moving parts that could wear out from long periods of running. It's far better to have a fanless system that is designed to be fanless, than one that relies on a fan for cooling and is in trouble if that fan breaks or gets clogged up with the kind of dust and gunk that often floats around inside observatories.

I don't know what your current in-observatory system is, but I would just opt for a low power system instead of trying to come up with some power management/synchronization machination for a single remote PC. Something NUC-ish is suitable for almost any observatory's control and acquisition system. You can find small systems with 15W TDP Intel i3 or i5 CPUs that sip power are completely adequate for the task.

You can have it do stuff during the daytime, too. Run a weather station, monitor inside temperature/humidity sensors, or an all-sky or security cameras, for example.

On Apr 18, 2021, at 08:17, Steve Reilly <sreilly24590@centurylink.net> wrote:

While not directly mount related it does concern powering systems. For a system I run at SRO and one at home I have Web Power switches for the scripting the powering of equipment on/off through ACP Expert which works great but now years after just leaving the computers on 24/7 forever I wonder about the intelligence of that practice. I do have the computer’s BIOS set to restore to previous state should there be a power loss so that it turns back on and in turn opens the programs I have in the Start Menu which is fine for emergencies but I suspect I wouldn’t want to force stop/start it like that on a regular basis if not necessary. I’ve read a bit about Wake On LAN but that requires a computer that is on that network to access the computer you want woken which in this case is doable even with SRO as they have a VPN that sets the remote computer as part of your local network. I can Remote Desktop into that system using the IP address from home when the VPN is connected.

But of course I’m looking for more fool proofing such as not relaying on memory to connect and turn on each system every day as that will most certainly be forgotten from time to time and likely on the very best of nights. So the real question hidden deep in this post is if anyone knows of a mostly foolproof method to have remote computers turn on and off at predetermined times. I would expect you’d want to calculate the earliest time for On in your area considering DST and off by the latest morning time. Say you may want 4PM start for the winter when you could be imaging by 5:30pm in some areas and off at 9am in the morning which would/should allow time for sky flats should you take them both evening and morning. This at least gives the computer a rest of 15+ hours a day and in my case where I use a Starlight Xpress UltraStar guider t to would be powered down as it’s always on when connected to the computer’s USB.

Just think there should be a more reasonable way to run these system that would be easier on the computers as well as being more efficient. Anything obvious I’m missing? Suggestions?


Re: APPM Image Scale Question and Suggestions

Ray Gralak
 

Hi Marty,

1. With a color camera the appropriate x-scale and y-scale factors to enter are twice the individual pixel dimensions.
In my case I should enter 0.52 rather than 0.26 for each X and Y scale. Is that correct?
This assumes the information you provided is correct (that 2x2 binning results in 1 arc-sec/pixel image scale using the ASI294MC with a 300mm aperature F15 scope).

-Ray


-----Original Message-----
From: main@ap-gto.groups.io [mailto:main@ap-gto.groups.io] On Behalf Of mjb87 via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, April 18, 2021 4:26 AM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] APPM Image Scale Question and Suggestions

[Edited Message Follows]

Thanks. I appreciate the assistance. Here is what I'm taking away so far

1. With a color camera the appropriate x-scale and y-scale factors to enter are twice the individual pixel dimensions.
In my case I should enter 0.52 rather than 0.26 for each X and Y scale. Is that correct? (Not sure I understand why
it would be.)

2. When you later attempt to redo a platesolve on a saved image, and when it reports its estimated actual image
scale, it is reporting the binned scale. In other words, the reason my reported scale was 1.04 is that the actual
unbinned image scale was 0.52 and I was using 2x2 binning. Is that correct? (If so, it might be helpful to modify that
window to emphasize that the reported scale is binned scale.)

3. I may just be asking too much to get good solutions using an f/15 telescope and a camera with small pixels, given
my Bortle 5 skies and with the moon out. One option is to use a camera with a larger pixel size. As evidence of this,
in using a similar camera on my 130mm GTX I still had to do 2x2 binning to get easy solutions. I use a Lodestar X2
as a guide camera on my other setup. It has 8.2x8.4 pixels. I can try that instead of the ASI1600MC-Cool.

4. Other things to try: more tolerance around image scale, less sigma above mean, longer exposures.

Make sense?


Re: APPM Image Scale Question and Suggestions

Ray Gralak
 

Hi Marcelo,

Ray wrote:
2x2 binning of 0.26 arc-secs/pixel should be 0.52 arc-secs/pixel, not 1.0 arc-secs/pixel.

However, since this is a color camera, if each group of 4-pixels is considered 1 pixel, then you should enter
0.52 arc-secs/pixel in APPM for the X and Y image scale values.
Marcello wrote:
I assume that the same principles apply for the ASI294MM camera, whose default mode is 2x2 binning, right?
What I posted above was just a theory. The ASI294MM, which is monochrome, recently received a firmware upgrade to "unlock" the higher resolution (natively unbinned). So, it may be that in the color camera (ASI294MC), each "logical pixel" consists of four color-filtered native pixels. So, pixel-scale may depend on the camera modes defined by the sensor and implemented by the camera manufacturer.

-Ray

-----Original Message-----
From: main@ap-gto.groups.io [mailto:main@ap-gto.groups.io] On Behalf Of Marcelo Figueroa via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, April 17, 2021 10:03 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] APPM Image Scale Question and Suggestions

On Sat, Apr 17, 2021 at 05:31 PM, Ray Gralak wrote:


2x2 binning of 0.26 arc-secs/pixel should be 0.52 arc-secs/pixel, not 1.0 arc-secs/pixel.

However, since this is a color camera, if each group of 4-pixels is considered 1 pixel, then you should enter
0.52 arc-secs/pixel in APPM for the X and Y image scale values.

I assume that the same principles apply for the ASI294MM camera, whose default mode is 2x2 binning, right?


Re: Questions.....does wireless now work correctly with latest updates AND does your Sky Safari 6 Pro allow multiple Park positions now.

midmoastro
 

Yes wireless connection works. After disconnecting i have options for
-Disconnect without Parking
-Park at Position 4
-Park at Position 3
-Park at Current Position

This using SkySafari 6 Pro on my Mac, version 6.8.1 (6810)


Re: Questions.....does wireless now work correctly with latest updates AND does your Sky Safari 6 Pro allow multiple Park positions now.

midmoastro
 

I think I found the port. Give me a bit of time and I will try and confirm later today
Todd


Re: Questions.....does wireless now work correctly with latest updates AND does your Sky Safari 6 Pro allow multiple Park positions now.

midmoastro
 

Robert, I'd be happy to try this but can you confirm a couple things first?
Is the CP4 connected to home wireless and in SF you are just specifying the IP and port of the CP4 to connect? If so, whats port should be used?
Lastly, what do I need to do to confirm the other park positions? Last night I was connected via USB to my Mac and I am pretty sure I parked it in position 3 but unsure if that has always been there. I can confirm again today.
Todd


Powering Remote Imaging Systems

Steve Reilly
 

While not directly mount related it does concern powering systems. For a system I run at SRO and one at home I have Web Power switches for the scripting the powering of equipment on/off through ACP Expert which works great but now years after just leaving the computers on 24/7 forever I wonder about the intelligence of that practice. I do have the computer’s BIOS set to restore to previous state should there be a power loss so that it turns back on and in turn opens the programs I have in the Start Menu which is fine for emergencies but I suspect I wouldn’t want to force stop/start it like that on a regular basis if not necessary. I’ve read a bit about Wake On LAN but that requires a computer that is on that network to access the computer you want woken which in this case is doable even with SRO as they have a VPN that sets the remote computer as part of your local network. I can Remote Desktop into that system using the IP address from home when the VPN is connected.

 

But of course I’m looking for more fool proofing such as not relaying on memory to connect and turn on each system every day  as that will most certainly be forgotten from time to time and likely on the very best of nights. So the real question hidden deep in this post is if anyone knows of a mostly foolproof method to have remote computers turn on and off at predetermined times. I would expect you’d want to calculate the earliest time for On in your area considering DST and off by the latest morning time. Say you may want 4PM start for the winter when you could be imaging by 5:30pm in some areas and off at 9am in the morning which would/should allow time for sky flats should you take them both evening and morning. This at least gives the computer a rest of 15+ hours a day and in my case where I use a Starlight Xpress UltraStar guider t to would be powered down as it’s always on when connected to the computer’s USB.

 

Just think there should be a more reasonable way to run these system that would be easier on the computers as well as being more efficient. Anything obvious I’m missing? Suggestions?


Re: APPM Image Scale Question and Suggestions

mjb87@...
 
Edited

Thanks. I appreciate the assistance. Here is what I'm taking away so far

1. With a color camera the appropriate x-scale and y-scale factors to enter are twice the individual pixel dimensions. In my case I should enter 0.52 rather than 0.26 for each X and Y scale. Is that correct?  (Not sure I understand why it would be.)

2. When you later attempt to redo a platesolve on a saved image, and when it reports its estimated actual image scale, it is reporting the binned scale. In other words, the reason my reported scale was 1.04 is that the actual unbinned image scale was 0.52 and I was using 2x2 binning. Is that correct?  (If so, it might be helpful to modify that window to emphasize that the reported scale is binned scale.)

3. I may just be asking too much to get good solutions using an f/15 telescope and a camera with small pixels, given my Bortle 5 skies and with the moon out. One option is to use a camera with a larger pixel size. As evidence of this, in using a similar camera on my 130mm GTX I still had to do 2x2 binning to get easy solutions. I use a Lodestar X2 as a guide camera on my other setup. It has 8.2x8.4 pixels. I can try that instead of the ASI1600MC-Cool.

4. Other things to try: more tolerance around image scale, less sigma above mean, longer exposures.

Make sense?


AP 600 E Goto

thefamily90 Phillips
 

Hello All,
I just purchased a near new AP Mach1 which leaves me with an AP 600 E GOTO I am willing to sell. If interested please email me directly for details.

Thefamily90@....

Best,

Jim


Re: APPM Image Scale Question and Suggestions

Marcelo Figueroa
 

On Sat, Apr 17, 2021 at 05:31 PM, Ray Gralak wrote:
2x2 binning of 0.26 arc-secs/pixel should be 0.52 arc-secs/pixel, not 1.0 arc-secs/pixel.

However, since this is a color camera, if each group of 4-pixels is considered 1 pixel, then you should enter 0.52 arc-secs/pixel in APPM for the X and Y image scale values.
I assume that the same principles apply for the ASI294MM camera, whose default mode is 2x2 binning, right?
 


M 81

KHursh
 

I know this is an oft-imaged galaxy, but it is one of the first images I am proud of.
Image processing is challenging, but capture is a breeze with the Mach2.
Sky-watcher 120 with ASI294MM,

https://astrob.in/kxm7yk/0/

Kevin


NGC 3347 and NGC 3358

Geoff Smith
 

NGC 3347 is an elongated spiral galaxy, while NGC 3358 is a face-on lenticular galaxy There is a barely visible faint tidal stream between NGC 3347 and the smaller round spiral NGC 3354. Both NGC 3347 and NGC 3354 have similar red-shifts, suggesting that this is a genuine association and not merely a line-of-sight coincidence.

Plane Wave 12.5" CDK on AP900 with FLI Proline 16803

Technical details here https://www.astrobin.com/qlym15/

Higher resolution here https://www.astrobin.com/full/qlym15/0/

Geoff


Questions.....does wireless now work correctly with latest updates AND does your Sky Safari 6 Pro allow multiple Park positions now.

Robert Berta
 

Background....since I got my 1100 mount (early model) with CP4 I tried to get it to work reliably with Sky Safari 6 Pro wireless via the AP built in wireless module. This is with Android cell phone and also Samsung Galaxy tablets.

In addition I and other AP owners were hoping that Sky Safari 6 Pro would support the multiple choices of Park positions. After updating my CP4 to the latest version firmware I noted that one fix in the update log was an improvement to wireless. Keeping my finger crossed I gave it a try.

I am also a BETA tester for Sky Safari and the version I have now has multiple Park positions including a user selectable position...just like the mount hand controller with latest AP firmware hand controller updates.

I fired up my AP wireless and FINALLY it seemed to work correctly and doesn't drop the connection as both Android and Apple products had issues staying connected before.

Could some other owners test both the wireless with Sky Safari 6Pro and also whether their non-BETA version has the additional Park positions feature now? I am hoping that finally both issues have been put to bed. I will do some more testing myself soon.


Re: APPM Image Scale Question and Suggestions

Mike Dodd
 

On 4/17/2021 8:23 PM, Ray Gralak wrote:
What am I missing?
Marty said 2x2 binning was producing images with 1 arc-sec/pixel
scale. What other reason would there be for 2x2 binning to produce 1
arc/sec pixel when each pixel is 0.26 arc-seconds? It *should*
produce 0.52 arc-sec/pixel image, right?
Yes. Something didn't "click." Sorry for my confusion.

--- Mike


Re: APPM Image Scale Question and Suggestions

Ray Gralak
 

What am I missing?
Marty said 2x2 binning was producing images with 1 arc-sec/pixel scale. What other reason would there be for 2x2 binning to produce 1 arc/sec pixel when each pixel is 0.26 arc-seconds? It *should* produce 0.52 arc-sec/pixel image, right?

-Ray

-----Original Message-----
From: main@ap-gto.groups.io [mailto:main@ap-gto.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mike Dodd
Sent: Saturday, April 17, 2021 3:43 PM
To: main@ap-gto.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] APPM Image Scale Question and Suggestions

On 4/17/2021 6:31 PM, Ray Gralak wrote:

However, since this is a color camera, if each group of 4-pixels is
considered 1 pixel, then you should enter 0.52 arc-secs/pixel in APPM
for the X and Y image scale values.
I don't understand that, Ray. A pixel is a pixel regardless of the color
filter over it.

When an image is debayered, the debayering algorithm gets light values
from every pixel, and assigns RGB values to the same pixels in the color
image.

the resulting color image has the same number of pixels as the
non-debayered image. The image size is unchanged.

What am I missing?

--- Mike







Re: APPM Image Scale Question and Suggestions

John Jennings
 

Mike,

I also have a 130GTX with Quad reducer/flattener on a APMach1. With a full frame QHY410C or my QHY268C (APS-C) it literally screams through the sky plate solving instantly like a maniac in the same Bortle 8 skies.

John

1941 - 1960 of 79807