Date   

Re: Moving AP1100 to a remote site

Steve Reilly
 

Not sure what group you’ll be dealing with but SRO controls the group roof and the data you get as far as weather for  ACP is roof status. It will be perfectly clear all day and the weather will always show WEA which is cloudy and won’t go WEA till the roof is open. I’ve seen very cloudy days where the roof is open and weather show green (good) so you really are just getting a roof status and it makes no real difference other than you’ll need to reset your failed runs in ACP Scheduler or lose those. They obviously have to have a singular control system for the roof and weather settings seem to need seasonal changes to work well. Main thing is the telescope can be in any position and the roof will be safely closed.

 

-Steve

 

 

From: ap-gto@...
Sent: Thursday, October 3, 2019 3:19 PM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Moving AP1100 to a remote site

 

 

John,

Been using remotepc for more than  a month on at least 30 days.   Never had an issue.  Still using google Remote Desktop as backup, even though it is slow sometimes.   ACP was out of my price range.   I got APCC pro with a discount so I went that direction..  No issues, except sometimes my understanding.   I might just mention that I don’t have roof control or status at the group observatory.  Sometimes that is good and other times it can be frustrating in trying to synchronize weather data to roof  status.

Dave


On Oct 3, 2019, at 10:30, John Thompson jbtgolfer@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:

 

David.....

 

I read your email on remote access. I am also setting up a remote observatory outside Prescott Arizona. I have been looking at ACP but your comment on remotePC sounds interesting. I notice you say it is your primary, do you have a secondary option? Has your experience with remotePC been good? My primary  concern is this; my remote site is 120 miles away with no human backup. It means driving to the site ( on top of a mountain) whenever a failure occurs. Reliability is a must. I would appreciate any comments. If its not asking too much perhaps we can exchange a few emails on this topic.

 

Thanks for your help.

 

Clear Sky's,

 

John Thompson

Scottsdale Arizona

 

 

On Wednesday, October 2, 2019, 09:07:11 PM MST, david w pearson p.davidw@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:

 

 

 

Rick,

i just moved my 12" RC with AP1200 to NM in march.   here are some of my lessons learned.

1) Make sure site has everything ready and you have plenty of time allowed (took me 4 nights,  they said they were ready, but they weren't' loss a day)

2) have backup plan in case skies are not clear to do polar align while there

3) make sure cable bundles are tight and will be clear in all scope positions

4) if your mount does not have a defined home positions, may consider putting a inclinometer on scope ( my AP does not have a home position, so I added an inclinometer, saved me one time).   

5) I use a script to run scope unattended.   several issues i have had....script does not  get a message back from imaging software and just waits while scope keeping tracking.  weather delays need to park scope waiting for skies to clear.   not doing this put you a risk for pier collision if weather does not clear (failure to do meridian flip or below horizon).   I have APCC pro with meridian and horizon limits to provide backup if script stops and scope keeps tracking.  has hit horizon limit 2 or 3 times.

6) need weather data file if don't have roof status.   include additional time margin for roof to open after weather message says clear.    

7) have remote desktop software with a backup.    Team viewer shut me down for remote operations.    Google remote desktop changed app and now runs very slow.   i use remote Pc as primary.

8) have a method to download images....i use google drive...works well

9) need a remote power strip....i use data loggers web power switch pro

10) depending on scope type may consider hard light/dew shield especially if in group observatory

11) dew heaters on scope

12) make site IT person your buddy

13)  take tape to cover LED's....amazing how much light is given off without tape

14) don't install around new moon as impacts others who maybe operating telescope starting at end of ast twilight.    amazing how much no moon nights are lost to weather....No moon nights are premium

 

dave

 

 

 

 

 

On Wednesday, October 2, 2019, 07:41:38 PM PDT, rick@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:

 

 

 

Hello All,

 

In Dec, I am moving my ap1100 non encoder CP4 to remote site in NM. I currently have APCC Standard.

 

I am looking for some best practice recommendations regarding what I definitely need to get set up out there vs what I can do later once back home once.

 

I think I need to get done at the site, in addition to a solid PA, is:

 

Set my home position

Set my Horizon and Meridian limits

 

I will be setting up a light panel so I think my home position should be pointing at it.

 

I have not used the Horizon/Meridian limits function yet but it appears it is fairly easy to learn and set up for the first time when I am out there. I hope I can do it in one night since my time there is limited.

 

I might upgrade to APCC Pro. If I set my Horizon and Meridian limits in standard, will they transfer to Pro?

 

What else should I be thinking of?

 

I am somewhat familiar with the basics of APCC and I have set up the connection/virtual ports here at home and my connections are repeatable and solid..

 

I want to make sure I do everything I need to at the mount at the site. 

 


Re: Moving AP1100 to a remote site

david w pearson
 

John,
Been using remotepc for more than  a month on at least 30 days.   Never had an issue.  Still using google Remote Desktop as backup, even though it is slow sometimes.   ACP was out of my price range.   I got APCC pro with a discount so I went that direction.  No issues, except sometimes my understanding.   I might just mention that I don’t have roof control or status at the group observatory.  Sometimes that is good and other times it can be frustrating in trying to synchronize weather data to roof  status.
Dave


On Oct 3, 2019, at 10:30, John Thompson jbtgolfer@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:

 

David.....

I read your email on remote access. I am also setting up a remote observatory outside Prescott Arizona. I have been looking at ACP but your comment on remotePC sounds interesting. I notice you say it is your primary, do you have a secondary option? Has your experience with remotePC been good? My primary  concern is this; my remote site is 120 miles away with no human backup. It means driving to the site ( on top of a mountain) whenever a failure occurs. Reliability is a must. I would appreciate any comments. If its not asking too much perhaps we can exchange a few emails on this topic.

Thanks for your help.

Clear Sky's,

John Thompson
Scottsdale Arizona


On Wednesday, October 2, 2019, 09:07:11 PM MST, david w pearson p.davidw@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:


 

Rick,
i just moved my 12" RC with AP1200 to NM in march.   here are some of my lessons learned.
1) Make sure site has everything ready and you have plenty of time allowed (took me 4 nights,  they said they were ready, but they weren't' loss a day)
2) have backup plan in case skies are not clear to do polar align while there
3) make sure cable bundles are tight and will be clear in all scope positions
4) if your mount does not have a defined home positions, may consider putting a inclinometer on scope ( my AP does not have a home position, so I added an inclinometer, saved me one time).   
5) I use a script to run scope unattended.   several issues i have had....script does not  get a message back from imaging software and just waits while scope keeping tracking.  weather delays need to park scope waiting for skies to clear.   not doing this put you a risk for pier collision if weather does not clear (failure to do meridian flip or below horizon).   I have APCC pro with meridian and horizon limits to provide backup if script stops and scope keeps tracking.  has hit horizon limit 2 or 3 times.
6) need weather data file if don't have roof status.   include additional time margin for roof to open after weather message says clear.    
7) have remote desktop software with a backup.    Team viewer shut me down for remote operations.    Google remote desktop changed app and now runs very slow.   i use remote Pc as primary.
8) have a method to download images....i use google drive...works well
9) need a remote power strip....i use data loggers web power switch pro
10) depending on scope type may consider hard light/dew shield especially if in group observatory
11) dew heaters on scope
12) make site IT person your buddy
13)  take tape to cover LED's....amazing how much light is given off without tape
14) don't install around new moon as impacts others who maybe operating telescope starting at end of ast twilight.    amazing how much no moon nights are lost to weather....No moon nights are premium

dave





On Wednesday, October 2, 2019, 07:41:38 PM PDT, rick@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:


 

Hello All,


In Dec, I am moving my ap1100 non encoder CP4 to remote site in NM. I currently have APCC Standard.


I am looking for some best practice recommendations regarding what I definitely need to get set up out there vs what I can do later once back home once.


I think I need to get done at the site, in addition to a solid PA, is:


Set my home position

Set my Horizon and Meridian limits


I will be setting up a light panel so I think my home position should be pointing at it.


I have not used the Horizon/Meridian limits function yet but it appears it is fairly easy to learn and set up for the first time when I am out there. I hope I can do it in one night since my time there is limited.


I might upgrade to APCC Pro. If I set my Horizon and Meridian limits in standard, will they transfer to Pro?


What else should I be thinking of?


I am somewhat familiar with the basics of APCC and I have set up the connection/virtual ports here at home and my connections are repeatable and solid.


I want to make sure I do everything I need to at the mount at the site. 



Re: Mach2, CP5, & AP V2 Driver

 

Ray is updating the driver for the Mach2. No worries.

 

Clear Skies,

 

Marj Christen

Astro-Physics, Inc

11250 Forest Hills Rd

Machesney Park, IL 61115

Phone: 815-282-1513

Fax: 815-282-9847

www.astro-physics.com

 

From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...]
Sent: Thursday, October 03, 2019 1:06 PM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: [ap-gto] Mach2, CP5, & AP V2 Driver

 

 

In anticipation of getting notified about the Mach2 mount, I find my current driver does not have settings for Mach2 or CP5.  Is there another driver available for the Mach2, or an update to my current one, v5.20.09?

Larry


Mach2, CP5, & AP V2 Driver

Larry Phillips
 

In anticipation of getting notified about the Mach2 mount, I find my current driver does not have settings for Mach2 or CP5.  Is there another driver available for the Mach2, or an update to my current one, v5.20.09?

Larry


Re: Moving AP1100 to a remote site

John Thompson <jbtgolfer@...>
 

David.....

I read your email on remote access. I am also setting up a remote observatory outside Prescott Arizona. I have been looking at ACP but your comment on remotePC sounds interesting. I notice you say it is your primary, do you have a secondary option? Has your experience with remotePC been good? My primary  concern is this; my remote site is 120 miles away with no human backup. It means driving to the site ( on top of a mountain) whenever a failure occurs. Reliability is a must. I would appreciate any comments. If its not asking too much perhaps we can exchange a few emails on this topic.

Thanks for your help.

Clear Sky's,

John Thompson
Scottsdale Arizona


On Wednesday, October 2, 2019, 09:07:11 PM MST, david w pearson p.davidw@... [ap-gto] wrote:


 

Rick,
i just moved my 12" RC with AP1200 to NM in march.   here are some of my lessons learned.
1) Make sure site has everything ready and you have plenty of time allowed (took me 4 nights,  they said they were ready, but they weren't' loss a day)
2) have backup plan in case skies are not clear to do polar align while there
3) make sure cable bundles are tight and will be clear in all scope positions
4) if your mount does not have a defined home positions, may consider putting a inclinometer on scope ( my AP does not have a home position, so I added an inclinometer, saved me one time).   
5) I use a script to run scope unattended.   several issues i have had....script does not  get a message back from imaging software and just waits while scope keeping tracking.  weather delays need to park scope waiting for skies to clear.   not doing this put you a risk for pier collision if weather does not clear (failure to do meridian flip or below horizon).   I have APCC pro with meridian and horizon limits to provide backup if script stops and scope keeps tracking.  has hit horizon limit 2 or 3 times.
6) need weather data file if don't have roof status.   include additional time margin for roof to open after weather message says clear.    
7) have remote desktop software with a backup.    Team viewer shut me down for remote operations.    Google remote desktop changed app and now runs very slow.   i use remote Pc as primary.
8) have a method to download images....i use google drive...works well
9) need a remote power strip....i use data loggers web power switch pro
10) depending on scope type may consider hard light/dew shield especially if in group observatory
11) dew heaters on scope
12) make site IT person your buddy
13)  take tape to cover LED's....amazing how much light is given off without tape
14) don't install around new moon as impacts others who maybe operating telescope starting at end of ast twilight.    amazing how much no moon nights are lost to weather....No moon nights are premium

dave





On Wednesday, October 2, 2019, 07:41:38 PM PDT, rick@... [ap-gto] wrote:


 

Hello All,


In Dec, I am moving my ap1100 non encoder CP4 to remote site in NM. I currently have APCC Standard.


I am looking for some best practice recommendations regarding what I definitely need to get set up out there vs what I can do later once back home once.


I think I need to get done at the site, in addition to a solid PA, is:


Set my home position

Set my Horizon and Meridian limits


I will be setting up a light panel so I think my home position should be pointing at it.


I have not used the Horizon/Meridian limits function yet but it appears it is fairly easy to learn and set up for the first time when I am out there. I hope I can do it in one night since my time there is limited.


I might upgrade to APCC Pro. If I set my Horizon and Meridian limits in standard, will they transfer to Pro?


What else should I be thinking of?


I am somewhat familiar with the basics of APCC and I have set up the connection/virtual ports here at home and my connections are repeatable and solid.


I want to make sure I do everything I need to at the mount at the site. 



Re: Moving AP1100 to a remote site

david w pearson
 

Rick,
i just moved my 12" RC with AP1200 to NM in march.   here are some of my lessons learned.
1) Make sure site has everything ready and you have plenty of time allowed (took me 4 nights,  they said they were ready, but they weren't' loss a day)
2) have backup plan in case skies are not clear to do polar align while there
3) make sure cable bundles are tight and will be clear in all scope positions
4) if your mount does not have a defined home positions, may consider putting a inclinometer on scope ( my AP does not have a home position, so I added an inclinometer, saved me one time).   
5) I use a script to run scope unattended.   several issues i have had....script does not  get a message back from imaging software and just waits while scope keeping tracking.  weather delays need to park scope waiting for skies to clear.   not doing this put you a risk for pier collision if weather does not clear (failure to do meridian flip or below horizon).   I have APCC pro with meridian and horizon limits to provide backup if script stops and scope keeps tracking.  has hit horizon limit 2 or 3 times.
6) need weather data file if don't have roof status.   include additional time margin for roof to open after weather message says clear.    
7) have remote desktop software with a backup.    Team viewer shut me down for remote operations.    Google remote desktop changed app and now runs very slow.   i use remote Pc as primary.
8) have a method to download images....i use google drive...works well
9) need a remote power strip....i use data loggers web power switch pro
10) depending on scope type may consider hard light/dew shield especially if in group observatory
11) dew heaters on scope
12) make site IT person your buddy
13)  take tape to cover LED's....amazing how much light is given off without tape
14) don't install around new moon as impacts others who maybe operating telescope starting at end of ast twilight.    amazing how much no moon nights are lost to weather....No moon nights are premium

dave





On Wednesday, October 2, 2019, 07:41:38 PM PDT, rick@... [ap-gto] wrote:


 

Hello All,


In Dec, I am moving my ap1100 non encoder CP4 to remote site in NM. I currently have APCC Standard.


I am looking for some best practice recommendations regarding what I definitely need to get set up out there vs what I can do later once back home once.


I think I need to get done at the site, in addition to a solid PA, is:


Set my home position

Set my Horizon and Meridian limits


I will be setting up a light panel so I think my home position should be pointing at it.


I have not used the Horizon/Meridian limits function yet but it appears it is fairly easy to learn and set up for the first time when I am out there. I hope I can do it in one night since my time there is limited.


I might upgrade to APCC Pro. If I set my Horizon and Meridian limits in standard, will they transfer to Pro?


What else should I be thinking of?


I am somewhat familiar with the basics of APCC and I have set up the connection/virtual ports here at home and my connections are repeatable and solid.


I want to make sure I do everything I need to at the mount at the site. 



Moving AP1100 to a remote site

Rick Darden
 

Hello All,


In Dec, I am moving my ap1100 non encoder CP4 to remote site in NM. I currently have APCC Standard.


I am looking for some best practice recommendations regarding what I definitely need to get set up out there vs what I can do later once back home once.


I think I need to get done at the site, in addition to a solid PA, is:


Set my home position

Set my Horizon and Meridian limits


I will be setting up a light panel so I think my home position should be pointing at it.


I have not used the Horizon/Meridian limits function yet but it appears it is fairly easy to learn and set up for the first time when I am out there. I hope I can do it in one night since my time there is limited.


I might upgrade to APCC Pro. If I set my Horizon and Meridian limits in standard, will they transfer to Pro?


What else should I be thinking of?


I am somewhat familiar with the basics of APCC and I have set up the connection/virtual ports here at home and my connections are repeatable and solid.


I want to make sure I do everything I need to at the mount at the site. 



Re: Helix - 200 hours of data

slawomirlipinski@...
 

Thank you Rolando, Stuart and Matt.


Also, thank you Bill for your very kind offer, but overall I am quite pleased with the result and ready to move on to something else.


Re: Helix - 200 hours of data

Bill Long
 

Agreed on all fronts. I'd have to travel top image it myself 

From: ap-gto@... on behalf of Stuart Heggie stuart.j.heggie@... [ap-gto] Sent: Monday, September 30, 2019 11:28 AM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Helix - 200 hours of data
 
 

Processing discussion aside, it is a pretty amazing looking shot! I too didn't appreciate this full extent of the Helix before. Alas, way too low for me to try for.


On Sun, 29 Sep 2019 at 23:12, slawomirlipinski@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

Hi all,


Sharing my latest narrowband image of the Helix, taken with my trusty Mach1 controlled by SGP - set up in the afternoon, polar align at dusk and pack up in the morning. Easy-peasy.


Some basic info:

 

-> The image is a blend of 0.55 HA_SNO + 0.1 HA_HNO + 0.35 HA_HSO. I know, not really scientific.

 

-> Integration (203 hours):

 

HA = 194 x 900s + 157 x 1200s
OIII = 124 x 900s
NII = 88 x 900s
SII = 167 x 900s + 22 x 1200s

 

-> 4" refractor, ICX 814, coastal location 20deg South of the Equator.

 

-> The background looks a bit gritty, but the data is extremely stretched, since background st.dev in all masters was only about 1 ADU.

 

Astrobin: https://www.astrobin...q9xl7a/?nc=user

 

High resolution: https://cdn.astrobin....6_wmhqkGbg.jpg


Thank you for looking

Suavi


Re: Helix - 200 hours of data

Matt Dahl
 

This is an amazingly deep image.  Really cool to see all that faint stuff around the edges.  I’m with Roland and Stuart - no idea all that surrounded the helix.  It is also too low for me at home, too, but something I definitely want to shoot the next time I travel south.

Thanks for sharing!

Clear Skies,
Matt

On Sep 30, 2019, at 11:28 AM, Stuart Heggie stuart.j.heggie@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:


Processing discussion aside, it is a pretty amazing looking shot! I too didn't appreciate this full extent of the Helix before. Alas, way too low for me to try for.


On Sun, 29 Sep 2019 at 23:12, slawomirlipinski@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

Hi all,


Sharing my latest narrowband image of the Helix, taken with my trusty Mach1 controlled by SGP - set up in the afternoon, polar align at dusk and pack up in the morning. Easy-peasy.


Some basic info:

 

-> The image is a blend of 0.55 HA_SNO + 0.1 HA_HNO + 0.35 HA_HSO. I know, not really scientific.

 

-> Integration (203 hours):

 

HA = 194 x 900s + 157 x 1200s
OIII = 124 x 900s
NII = 88 x 900s
SII = 167 x 900s + 22 x 1200s

 

-> 4" refractor, ICX 814, coastal location 20deg South of the Equator.

 

-> The background looks a bit gritty, but the data is extremely stretched, since background st.dev in all masters was only about 1 ADU.

 

Astrobin: https://www.astrobin...q9xl7a/?nc=user

 

High resolution: https://cdn.astrobin....6_wmhqkGbg.jpg


Thank you for looking

Suavi





Re: Helix - 200 hours of data

Stuart Heggie <stuart.j.heggie@...>
 

Processing discussion aside, it is a pretty amazing looking shot! I too didn't appreciate this full extent of the Helix before. Alas, way too low for me to try for.


On Sun, 29 Sep 2019 at 23:12, slawomirlipinski@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

Hi all,


Sharing my latest narrowband image of the Helix, taken with my trusty Mach1 controlled by SGP - set up in the afternoon, polar align at dusk and pack up in the morning. Easy-peasy.


Some basic info:

 

-> The image is a blend of 0.55 HA_SNO + 0.1 HA_HNO + 0.35 HA_HSO. I know, not really scientific.

 

-> Integration (203 hours):

 

HA = 194 x 900s + 157 x 1200s
OIII = 124 x 900s
NII = 88 x 900s
SII = 167 x 900s + 22 x 1200s

 

-> 4" refractor, ICX 814, coastal location 20deg South of the Equator.

 

-> The background looks a bit gritty, but the data is extremely stretched, since background st.dev in all masters was only about 1 ADU.

 

Astrobin: https://www.astrobin...q9xl7a/?nc=user

 

High resolution: https://cdn.astrobin....6_wmhqkGbg.jpg


Thank you for looking

Suavi


Re: Helix - 200 hours of data

Roland Christen
 

That is pretty amazing! Never knew there was so much stuff surrounding the Helix.

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: slawomirlipinski@... [ap-gto]
To: ap-gto
Sent: Sun, Sep 29, 2019 10:12 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] Helix - 200 hours of data



Hi all,

Sharing my latest narrowband image of the Helix, taken with my trusty Mach1 controlled by SGP - set up in the afternoon, polar align at dusk and pack up in the morning. Easy-peasy.

Some basic info:
 
-> The image is a blend of 0.55 HA_SNO + 0.1 HA_HNO + 0.35 HA_HSO. I know, not really scientific.
 
-> Integration (203 hours):
 
HA = 194 x 900s + 157 x 1200s
OIII = 124 x 900s
NII = 88 x 900s
SII = 167 x 900s + 22 x 1200s
 
-> 4" refractor, ICX 814, coastal location 20deg South of the Equator.
 
-> The background looks a bit gritty, but the data is extremely stretched, since background st.dev in all masters was only about 1 ADU.
 
 

Thank you for looking
Suavi



Re: Mach2 – How far down the list?

Horia
 

This is great news, thank you Marj.

Kind regards,
Horia


Re: Helix - 200 hours of data

Bill Long
 

Share the unaltered masters if you are willing, would love to look at the data myself and chat with you offline about the best way to work with it. 🙂 


From: ap-gto@... <ap-gto@...> on behalf of slawomirlipinski@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...>
Sent: Sunday, September 29, 2019 9:59 PM
To: ap-gto@... <ap-gto@...>
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Helix - 200 hours of data
 
 

Hi Bill,


Yes, I did 4 iterations on OIII and 5 on the rest of the channels. I did see the worms, and these were actually mostly generated by a light noise reduction. I could not find settings that would not introduce these artefacts.


Given that I wanted to show the faintest extensions which only registered less than 1 photon per hour of exposure, there was no way to hide these. Even though the background looks gritty, the data is very clean and st.dev for background in all masters is just under 1 ADU.


Thank you for pointing that out Bill, I may one day try to reprocess the Lum.


Re: Helix - 200 hours of data

slawomirlipinski@...
 

Hi Bill,


Yes, I did 4 iterations on OIII and 5 on the rest of the channels. I did see the worms, and these were actually mostly generated by a light noise reduction. I could not find settings that would not introduce these artefacts.


Given that I wanted to show the faintest extensions which only registered less than 1 photon per hour of exposure, there was no way to hide these. Even though the background looks gritty, the data is very clean and st.dev for background in all masters is just under 1 ADU.


Thank you for pointing that out Bill, I may one day try to reprocess the Lum.


Re: Helix - 200 hours of data

Bill Long
 

Did you use deconvolution on this? The background has wormy bits that are usually a dead giveaway that deconvolution was used and the algorithm set the globals incorrectly.  


From: ap-gto@... on behalf of slawomirlipinski@... [ap-gto]
Sent: Sunday, September 29, 2019 8:11 PM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: [ap-gto] Helix - 200 hours of data
 
 

Hi all,


Sharing my latest narrowband image of the Helix, taken with my trusty Mach1 controlled by SGP - set up in the afternoon, polar align at dusk and pack up in the morning. Easy-peasy.


Some basic info:

 

-> The image is a blend of 0.55 HA_SNO + 0.1 HA_HNO + 0.35 HA_HSO. I know, not really scientific.

 

-> Integration (203 hours):

 

HA = 194 x 900s + 157 x 1200s
OIII = 124 x 900s
NII = 88 x 900s
SII = 167 x 900s + 22 x 1200s

 

-> 4" refractor, ICX 814, coastal location 20deg South of the Equator.

 

-> The background looks a bit gritty, but the data is extremely stretched, since background st.dev in all masters was only about 1 ADU.

 

Astrobin: https://www.astrobin...q9xl7a/?nc=user

 

High resolution: https://cdn.astrobin....6_wmhqkGbg.jpg


Thank you for looking

Suavi


Helix - 200 hours of data

slawomirlipinski@...
 

Hi all,


Sharing my latest narrowband image of the Helix, taken with my trusty Mach1 controlled by SGP - set up in the afternoon, polar align at dusk and pack up in the morning. Easy-peasy.


Some basic info:

 

-> The image is a blend of 0.55 HA_SNO + 0.1 HA_HNO + 0.35 HA_HSO. I know, not really scientific.

 

-> Integration (203 hours):

 

HA = 194 x 900s + 157 x 1200s
OIII = 124 x 900s
NII = 88 x 900s
SII = 167 x 900s + 22 x 1200s

 

-> 4" refractor, ICX 814, coastal location 20deg South of the Equator.

 

-> The background looks a bit gritty, but the data is extremely stretched, since background st.dev in all masters was only about 1 ADU.

 

Astrobin: https://www.astrobin...q9xl7a/?nc=user

 

High resolution: https://cdn.astrobin....6_wmhqkGbg.jpg


Thank you for looking

Suavi


Re: Work In Progress: Gamma Cygnus Region in SHO (Experimental - C&C Welcome)

Ben Koltenbah
 

Thank you, Terri!


Re: Work In Progress: Gamma Cygnus Region in SHO (Experimental - C&C Welcome)

Terri Zittritsch
 

What a beautiful image.   I really like the intense vivid false colors of the narrowband images.   Everywhere you look in this image, there is some eye candy awaiting your glance.


Terri

On Sep 28, 2019, at 3:14 PM, benjamin.e.c.koltenbah@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:


Greetings!

I post this with some trepidation as I've been experimenting with color processing and enhancement of SHO data.  Sticking my neck out anyway, I'll ask for helpful comments and suggestions.

My subfolder link in the AP GTO folder:

Direct link to image in the folder:

AstroBin link for higher resolution:

This is very much a work in progress, but I've found this region to have so many interesting pieces that I wanted to process what I've got thus far and post it for your comments.  I assure you that I was not self-medicating on psychedelic substances while playing with ColorMask and CurvesTransform in PixInsight, but I was purposely pushing the envelope further than I normally do.  (Maybe I need to respect that envelope a bit more again?)  I left a twinge of my beloved green color, but made sure it did not overwhelm.

 

This is a two-panel mosaic around Sadr (Gamma Cygnus) taken with a Tak FSQ-106EDX4 and FLI ML16200 at 2.3 "/px on an AP Mach1GTO.  N is up, S down, W right, E left in the typical star almanac orientation, spanning about 20 min or 5 deg angle in RA and about 3 deg angle in DEC.  Sadr is the bright star just left of center.  I actually placed it dead center, but then discovered that this leaves a boring black nebula-less region along the left, so I cropped it a bit on that side.  The greater region about Sadr is IC 1318 or Sh2-108.  To the left is a nebula often called the Butterfly Nebula, although I've discovered there's a planetary nebula with that same name.  There is an open star cluster to the upper left, NGC 6910.  When I continue with this project (hopefully this same season), I'll do a better job researching the various parts of this image as I'm sure there are lots of other named places of interest present here.  Incidentally, the Crescent Nebula, NGC 6888, which many of us are much more familiar with, is just a bit out of view below the bottom right corner of this image.  Another mosaic panel there would easily cover it.

 

As for the features of the Sadr Region, I have found lots of neat pieces that may be worth revisiting with a larger scope in the future.  I was surprised and fascinated by the system of tendrils to the center right, fainter at the bottom right, that are reminiscent of the Veil Nebula.  There are little "tadpoles" also on the right upper side, likely those dark gas areas typically hiding formation of young stars, where the gas has not yet been consumed or blown away.  Sadr appears to be illuminating the nebula region just below and to the left of it.  And then there's the general collection of higher density of SII along the top, OIII along the bottom right.  That was a pleasant surprise as I wasn't familiar with this area and had no expectations of what I'd be able to illuminate.

 

To date I have collected (S,H,O) = 900s x (12,13,42) = (3,3.25,10.5) hr.  This represents three nights, roughly 50/50% time on each of the panels.  One night I devoted entirely to the OIII channel, and I had planned to devote the next solely to SII, but then the clouds and rain rolled in.  And a month later they have not left yet.  As a consequence, I have much smoother OIII data, but the SII data is still quite noisy.  The Ha data could stand to have more integration time, but as usual it's the strongest data, so I plan to accumulate more of it after the SII.

 

Thanks for looking and reading, and I appreciate your comments and suggestions.

 

Best Regards,

Ben

 






Re: Mach2 – How far down the list?

 

We just finished notifying the people on the Mach1 list and will start notification for the Mach2 list soon.

 

Clear Skies,

 

Marj Christen

Astro-Physics, Inc

11250 Forest Hills Rd

Machesney Park, IL 61115

Phone: 815-282-1513

Fax: 815-282-9847

www.astro-physics.com

 

From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...]
Sent: Sunday, September 29, 2019 10:21 AM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: [ap-gto] Mach2 – How far down the list?

 

 

I have registered myself on the notification list for the Mach2 sometime in April, shortly after Marj announced it to this group. On the Mach2 page, there is a message reading:

 

"We are presently notifying people who had signed up on the Mach1GTO list before it was closed."

 

Is this still up to date?

 

Kind regards,

Horia

 

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