Date   

Re: Heart Nebula

mike.hambrick@...
 

Very cool ! There is also a nice little galaxy on the left side of the heart.


Heart Nebula

Bill Long
 

Hello Astro Friends,

 I come back to you with another image. This was the main attraction in the last pass of good weather we had, and the subject of a post I did about background extraction. Winter in the PNW is unforgiving, and when you get a night to image, you take what you can get. This here is the Heart Nebula with about 12 hours of total integration time. This was taken with the AP 130GTX, FLI ML16200 camera, and AP1100 mount with APCC Pro and a 90 point model in APPM. 

The rest of the details are on Astrobin, I hope you all enjoy this. Happy Holidays!


Clear Skies!

Bill 


Re: Force on screws holding mount to pier

Barry Megdal
 

Good point about having the weights on w/o the scope.  Thanks to everyone for the advice.  My guess had been more screws on the South, but now I see a good reason.

 

-        Barry

 

Dr. Barry Megdal

 

President

Shb Instruments, Inc.

19215 Parthenia St.  Suite A

Northridge, CA 91324

www.shbinstruments.com

(818) 773-2000  (818)773-2005 fax

bmegdal@...

 

Faculty

Dept. of Electrical Engineering

Caltech

Pasadena, CA

bmegdal@... (use either email)

 


Re: Force on screws holding mount to pier

mike.hambrick@...
 

Hi Barry

Check out my post from November 6 regarding mount shifting on the pier during setup. There was quite a lot of back and forth in this thread with a lot of good input from George and others.


I use a portable pier with my 1100 mount, so my setup is not exactly the same as yours, but the same principles will still apply. Even with a balanced scope, the center of mass for the telescope / mount / counterweight assembly is not centered directly over the pier, but rather to the north side of it. This results in a tendency for all that weignt to try to tilt the assembly to the north, thereby pulling up on the south side. I have been told that the flat surface adapter is machined to tight enough tolerances that the tendency to tilt is either eliminated or negligible. This is not the case for my portable pier, and I have to make sure that the bolts that hold the base of the 1100 mount to the pier are suffiuciently tight. Someone also suggested that I switch from using plain flat washers to toothed lock washers under the bolts. This has made a big difference.


I think that the main point to deal with this issue is to know that it can occur, and to pay attention when setting up the mount on the pier to make sure everything fits together as it should.


I hope this helps.


Re: Force on screws holding mount to pier

Stuart
 

Barry, my wild guess would be based on this logic: I'm NEVER going to remove the counterweights with the scope still mounted BUT  I will remove the scope and leave the CW's in the lowest position. Not for long but if I was dismantling or assembling, the weights would be on always before the scope. So, it would seem to me that whenever the mount isn't in perfect balance, there would be pull UP on the south side (weights pulling down on the north side) of the plate and so I'd put the extra bolts on the south side of the plate..

Stuart

On Tue, 11 Dec 2018 at 01:01, 'Barry Megdal' bmegdal@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

I am trying to decide which of the threaded holes on the top of my Monolith pier I should use to mount the flat surface adapter for an 1100 mount.  I can have two extra screws on either the North of South side of the pier, but not both.

 

It is hard to decide visually so I thought I would ask – with a balanced scope on the 1100 is there more of an upwards force on the screws on the north or the south side of the base of the mount?  Or is it the same?

 

-        Barry

 

Dr. Barry Megdal

 

President

Shb Instruments, Inc.

19215 Parthenia St.  Suite A

Northridge, CA 91324

www.shbinstruments.com

(818) 773-2000  (818)773-2005 fax

bmegdal@...

 

Faculty

Dept. of Electrical Engineering

Caltech

Pasadena, CA

bmegdal@... (use either email)

 




Force on screws holding mount to pier

Barry Megdal
 

I am trying to decide which of the threaded holes on the top of my Monolith pier I should use to mount the flat surface adapter for an 1100 mount.  I can have two extra screws on either the North of South side of the pier, but not both.

 

It is hard to decide visually so I thought I would ask – with a balanced scope on the 1100 is there more of an upwards force on the screws on the north or the south side of the base of the mount?  Or is it the same?

 

-        Barry

 

Dr. Barry Megdal

 

President

Shb Instruments, Inc.

19215 Parthenia St.  Suite A

Northridge, CA 91324

www.shbinstruments.com

(818) 773-2000  (818)773-2005 fax

bmegdal@...

 

Faculty

Dept. of Electrical Engineering

Caltech

Pasadena, CA

bmegdal@... (use either email)

 


list question

Glenn Wallace
 

Question: are for-sale emails (for AP mounts/piers) permitted on this list?


Re: Jellyfish Nebula

REDIGER-LIZLOV Didier
 

hello

very nice field and especially with the little time of integration.
Nice set of colors

Didier

De : ap-gto@... <ap-gto@...> de la part de Bill Long bill@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...>
Envoyé : samedi 8 décembre 2018 06:32
À : ap-ug@...; ap-gto@...
Objet : [ap-gto] Jellyfish Nebula
 
 

Hello Astronuts (as Roland likes to say),

I return to you with another image taken with my trusty AP130 GTX and AP1100 Mount. While working on another project, I had a small window of time I could send the scope to collect data to kill off the night without being empty handed, due to my main object going behind trees at about 2am. So, I decided to snag small chunks of data of the Jellyfish Nebula and see what I could cobble together in terms of an integration. While not APOD worthy, this data came out fairly good considering I image from the harsh Pacific Northwest, and winter time is not our friend (usually). For this work I was doing I set up my AP1100 with a APCC Pro/APPM pointing model. in the process I discovered (with Ray's help) that there was an issue with the CP4 V10 firmware and the new APPM, so I upgraded to the V11 CP4 firmware, which worked wonderfully. If you are reading this, and use APPM, be sure to pop in the latest firmware so you dont end up with :#M_S killing your mojo on you. 😉 

Here is the data:

The total integration time is only 8 hours. To really get this to shine, I would probably need 24 hours, or at least more OIII. I took this using an FLI ML16200 camera, AP Quad TCC, and kept the objective dew and frost free with the Kendricks DigiFire 12 system, which is awesome! Not only does it have two very accurate sensors on it, it can power my focuser (MoonLite NiteCrawler) for me, without the need to run extra cables through the mount. I am also considering powering my camera from the other 12v port. We'll see.

Anyhow I hope you all enjoy the image here. 

Bonus points if anyone can help determine what the PN looking object in the cloud of IC444 is. Its in the upper left portion of the image, and shows up in all of my frames, and all of the other data (including a few APOD's) I have looked at. I tried using some lookup tools to figure it out, and came up empty. 

Happy Holidays!

Bill 



Re: Jellyfish Nebula

Bill Long
 

Also, I have shared the data set here:


In the event that anyone wants to play with it. There are both XISF PixInsight masters, as well as FITS masters for HA, OIII, and SII. The XISF files are already registered, the FITS are not. 

Early Christmas presents for my fellow AP lovers.

-Bill


From: ap-gto@... <ap-gto@...> on behalf of Bill Long bill@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...>
Sent: Saturday, December 8, 2018 3:28 PM
To: Stuart Heggie stuart.j.heggie@... [ap-gto]
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Jellyfish Nebula
 
 

Thanks Stuart! 😊

From: ap-gto@... <ap-gto@...> on behalf of Stuart Heggie stuart.j.heggie@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...>
Sent: Saturday, December 8, 2018 8:06 AM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Jellyfish Nebula
 
 

Really nicely done Bill!

Stuart

On Sat, 8 Dec 2018 at 00:32, Bill Long bill@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

Hello Astronuts (as Roland likes to say),

I return to you with another image taken with my trusty AP130 GTX and AP1100 Mount. While working on another project, I had a small window of time I could send the scope to collect data to kill off the night without being empty handed, due to my main object going behind trees at about 2am. So, I decided to snag small chunks of data of the Jellyfish Nebula and see what I could cobble together in terms of an integration. While not APOD worthy, this data came out fairly good considering I image from the harsh Pacific Northwest, and winter time is not our friend (usually). For this work I was doing I set up my AP1100 with a APCC Pro/APPM pointing model. in the process I discovered (with Ray's help) that there was an issue with the CP4 V10 firmware and the new APPM, so I upgraded to the V11 CP4 firmware, which worked wonderfully. If you are reading this, and use APPM, be sure to pop in the latest firmware so you dont end up with :#M_S killing your mojo on you. 😉 

Here is the data:

The total integration time is only 8 hours. To really get this to shine, I would probably need 24 hours, or at least more OIII. I took this using an FLI ML16200 camera, AP Quad TCC, and kept the objective dew and frost free with the Kendricks DigiFire 12 system, which is awesome! Not only does it have two very accurate sensors on it, it can power my focuser (MoonLite NiteCrawler) for me, without the need to run extra cables through the mount. I am also considering powering my camera from the other 12v port. We'll see.

Anyhow I hope you all enjoy the image here. 

Bonus points if anyone can help determine what the PN looking object in the cloud of IC444 is. Its in the upper left portion of the image, and shows up in all of my frames, and all of the other data (including a few APOD's) I have looked at. I tried using some lookup tools to figure it out, and came up empty. 

Happy Holidays!

Bill 




--


Re: Jellyfish Nebula

Bill Long
 

Thanks Stuart! 😊

From: ap-gto@... <ap-gto@...> on behalf of Stuart Heggie stuart.j.heggie@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...>
Sent: Saturday, December 8, 2018 8:06 AM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Jellyfish Nebula
 
 

Really nicely done Bill!

Stuart

On Sat, 8 Dec 2018 at 00:32, Bill Long bill@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

Hello Astronuts (as Roland likes to say),

I return to you with another image taken with my trusty AP130 GTX and AP1100 Mount. While working on another project, I had a small window of time I could send the scope to collect data to kill off the night without being empty handed, due to my main object going behind trees at about 2am. So, I decided to snag small chunks of data of the Jellyfish Nebula and see what I could cobble together in terms of an integration. While not APOD worthy, this data came out fairly good considering I image from the harsh Pacific Northwest, and winter time is not our friend (usually). For this work I was doing I set up my AP1100 with a APCC Pro/APPM pointing model. in the process I discovered (with Ray's help) that there was an issue with the CP4 V10 firmware and the new APPM, so I upgraded to the V11 CP4 firmware, which worked wonderfully. If you are reading this, and use APPM, be sure to pop in the latest firmware so you dont end up with :#M_S killing your mojo on you. 😉 

Here is the data:

The total integration time is only 8 hours. To really get this to shine, I would probably need 24 hours, or at least more OIII. I took this using an FLI ML16200 camera, AP Quad TCC, and kept the objective dew and frost free with the Kendricks DigiFire 12 system, which is awesome! Not only does it have two very accurate sensors on it, it can power my focuser (MoonLite NiteCrawler) for me, without the need to run extra cables through the mount. I am also considering powering my camera from the other 12v port. We'll see.

Anyhow I hope you all enjoy the image here. 

Bonus points if anyone can help determine what the PN looking object in the cloud of IC444 is. Its in the upper left portion of the image, and shows up in all of my frames, and all of the other data (including a few APOD's) I have looked at. I tried using some lookup tools to figure it out, and came up empty. 

Happy Holidays!

Bill 




--


Re: Jellyfish Nebula

Stuart
 

Really nicely done Bill!

Stuart

On Sat, 8 Dec 2018 at 00:32, Bill Long bill@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

Hello Astronuts (as Roland likes to say),

I return to you with another image taken with my trusty AP130 GTX and AP1100 Mount. While working on another project, I had a small window of time I could send the scope to collect data to kill off the night without being empty handed, due to my main object going behind trees at about 2am. So, I decided to snag small chunks of data of the Jellyfish Nebula and see what I could cobble together in terms of an integration. While not APOD worthy, this data came out fairly good considering I image from the harsh Pacific Northwest, and winter time is not our friend (usually). For this work I was doing I set up my AP1100 with a APCC Pro/APPM pointing model. in the process I discovered (with Ray's help) that there was an issue with the CP4 V10 firmware and the new APPM, so I upgraded to the V11 CP4 firmware, which worked wonderfully. If you are reading this, and use APPM, be sure to pop in the latest firmware so you dont end up with :#M_S killing your mojo on you. 😉 

Here is the data:

The total integration time is only 8 hours. To really get this to shine, I would probably need 24 hours, or at least more OIII. I took this using an FLI ML16200 camera, AP Quad TCC, and kept the objective dew and frost free with the Kendricks DigiFire 12 system, which is awesome! Not only does it have two very accurate sensors on it, it can power my focuser (MoonLite NiteCrawler) for me, without the need to run extra cables through the mount. I am also considering powering my camera from the other 12v port. We'll see.

Anyhow I hope you all enjoy the image here. 

Bonus points if anyone can help determine what the PN looking object in the cloud of IC444 is. Its in the upper left portion of the image, and shows up in all of my frames, and all of the other data (including a few APOD's) I have looked at. I tried using some lookup tools to figure it out, and came up empty. 

Happy Holidays!

Bill 





Re: Jellyfish Nebula

Bill Long
 

We can sometimes. Winter is usually bad, Spring is okay, Summer is excellent (if we don't get smoked out from wildfires), and Autumn is a toss up.

From: ap-gto@... <ap-gto@...> on behalf of chris1011@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...>
Sent: Saturday, December 8, 2018 7:32 AM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Jellyfish Nebula
 
 

Very good! I didn't think anyone could image from the Pacific Northwest.

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Long bill@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...>
To: ap-ug@... <ap-ug@...>; ap-gto@yahoogroups..com <ap-gto@...>
Sent: Fri, Dec 7, 2018 11:32 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] Jellyfish Nebula



Hello Astronuts (as Roland likes to say),

I return to you with another image taken with my trusty AP130 GTX and AP1100 Mount. While working on another project, I had a small window of time I could send the scope to collect data to kill off the night without being empty handed, due to my main object going behind trees at about 2am. So, I decided to snag small chunks of data of the Jellyfish Nebula and see what I could cobble together in terms of an integration. While not APOD worthy, this data came out fairly good considering I image from the harsh Pacific Northwest, and winter time is not our friend (usually). For this work I was doing I set up my AP1100 with a APCC Pro/APPM pointing model. in the process I discovered (with Ray's help) that there was an issue with the CP4 V10 firmware and the new APPM, so I upgraded to the V11 CP4 firmware, which worked wonderfully. If you are reading this, and use APPM, be sure to pop in the latest firmware so you dont end up with :#M_S killing your mojo on you. 😉 

Here is the data:

The total integration time is only 8 hours. To really get this to shine, I would probably need 24 hours, or at least more OIII. I took this using an FLI ML16200 camera, AP Quad TCC, and kept the objective dew and frost free with the Kendricks DigiFire 12 system, which is awesome! Not only does it have two very accurate sensors on it, it can power my focuser (MoonLite NiteCrawler) for me, without the need to run extra cables through the mount. I am also considering powering my camera from the other 12v port. We'll see.

Anyhow I hope you all enjoy the image here. 

Bonus points if anyone can help determine what the PN looking object in the cloud of IC444 is. Its in the upper left portion of the image, and shows up in all of my frames, and all of the other data (including a few APOD's) I have looked at. I tried using some lookup tools to figure it out, and came up empty. 

Happy Holidays!

Bill 





Re: Jellyfish Nebula

Roland Christen
 

Very good! I didn't think anyone could image from the Pacific Northwest.

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Long bill@... [ap-gto]
To: ap-ug@... ; ap-gto@...
Sent: Fri, Dec 7, 2018 11:32 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] Jellyfish Nebula



Hello Astronuts (as Roland likes to say),

I return to you with another image taken with my trusty AP130 GTX and AP1100 Mount. While working on another project, I had a small window of time I could send the scope to collect data to kill off the night without being empty handed, due to my main object going behind trees at about 2am. So, I decided to snag small chunks of data of the Jellyfish Nebula and see what I could cobble together in terms of an integration. While not APOD worthy, this data came out fairly good considering I image from the harsh Pacific Northwest, and winter time is not our friend (usually). For this work I was doing I set up my AP1100 with a APCC Pro/APPM pointing model. in the process I discovered (with Ray's help) that there was an issue with the CP4 V10 firmware and the new APPM, so I upgraded to the V11 CP4 firmware, which worked wonderfully. If you are reading this, and use APPM, be sure to pop in the latest firmware so you dont end up with :#M_S killing your mojo on you. 😉 

Here is the data:

The total integration time is only 8 hours. To really get this to shine, I would probably need 24 hours, or at least more OIII. I took this using an FLI ML16200 camera, AP Quad TCC, and kept the objective dew and frost free with the Kendricks DigiFire 12 system, which is awesome! Not only does it have two very accurate sensors on it, it can power my focuser (MoonLite NiteCrawler) for me, without the need to run extra cables through the mount. I am also considering powering my camera from the other 12v port. We'll see.

Anyhow I hope you all enjoy the image here. 

Bonus points if anyone can help determine what the PN looking object in the cloud of IC444 is. Its in the upper left portion of the image, and shows up in all of my frames, and all of the other data (including a few APOD's) I have looked at. I tried using some lookup tools to figure it out, and came up empty. 

Happy Holidays!

Bill 





Jellyfish Nebula

Bill Long
 

Hello Astronuts (as Roland likes to say),

I return to you with another image taken with my trusty AP130 GTX and AP1100 Mount. While working on another project, I had a small window of time I could send the scope to collect data to kill off the night without being empty handed, due to my main object going behind trees at about 2am. So, I decided to snag small chunks of data of the Jellyfish Nebula and see what I could cobble together in terms of an integration. While not APOD worthy, this data came out fairly good considering I image from the harsh Pacific Northwest, and winter time is not our friend (usually). For this work I was doing I set up my AP1100 with a APCC Pro/APPM pointing model. in the process I discovered (with Ray's help) that there was an issue with the CP4 V10 firmware and the new APPM, so I upgraded to the V11 CP4 firmware, which worked wonderfully. If you are reading this, and use APPM, be sure to pop in the latest firmware so you dont end up with :#M_S killing your mojo on you. 😉 

Here is the data:

The total integration time is only 8 hours. To really get this to shine, I would probably need 24 hours, or at least more OIII. I took this using an FLI ML16200 camera, AP Quad TCC, and kept the objective dew and frost free with the Kendricks DigiFire 12 system, which is awesome! Not only does it have two very accurate sensors on it, it can power my focuser (MoonLite NiteCrawler) for me, without the need to run extra cables through the mount. I am also considering powering my camera from the other 12v port. We'll see.

Anyhow I hope you all enjoy the image here. 

Bonus points if anyone can help determine what the PN looking object in the cloud of IC444 is. Its in the upper left portion of the image, and shows up in all of my frames, and all of the other data (including a few APOD's) I have looked at. I tried using some lookup tools to figure it out, and came up empty. 

Happy Holidays!

Bill 



Re: APCC and Master/slave computers

DFisch
 

Joe I’m keeping this for posterity

On Fri, Dec 7, 2018 at 15:24 'Joseph Zeglinski' J.Zeglinski@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

Hi again ... Chris
 
    I awoke today and just realized I left out a few important points in my TEAMVIEWER advice on your  posted subject (Nov. 30).
 
    First, I forgot to say that to guarantee a solid WiFi connection to the backyard scope (APCC) computer you MUST use its Dot-format “IP-address” (e.g. 192.168.1.xxx) rather than the TeamViewer’s Server,  space separated 9-digit number, which is usually shown at the left half at launch,  as “YOUR I.D.” (at the remote PC’s screen). Using the install-time configured TeamViewer 9-digit server address, would still travel via a circuitous off-site link to the backyard.
 
    If you don’t know your backyard PC’s WiFi “IPv4 address” (e.g. by running Command Prompt – “IPconfig”), you can also see it in TV’s login pop-up ... if you (temporarily) change the “Incoming LAN Connections”  settings box to “Accept EXCLUSIVELY)” and restart TV. Then, having written down that address for ALL future backyard local WiFi network connections, you can reset TV back to ACCEPT mode, in order to maintain the option to login to your scope system from a far more remote location. Sometimes you may want to do some scope PC,  Win-10 maintenance from the office, or show a friend a few scope PC hard drive stored CCD images. So it is useful to have the cross-country LAN connection option, even if rarely needed by backyard operation astronomers.
 
    However, if you want total lockout security from possible hackers, you could keep the “connect EXCLUSIVELY” mode setting, but with loss of the option of login from an off-site PC. As long as you always launch TeamViewer using “ONLY the IP-form of address”, (rather than the 9-digit format),  you will avoid the cross-continent hook up through TeamViewer’s office worldwide LAN server chain.
    So, ALWAYS use the IP login for best, most reliable backyard connection.
 
*******
 
    Secondly, to get MUCH faster, WiFi connection to the backyard APCC controlled scope, add-on a ...  USB type WiFi Stick Adapter antenna, such as I use – “ASUS-56”. There are other similar brands of this kind of adapter (e.g. from Trend Micro, D-Link, etc. – wouldn’t trust anything, using Huawei communications products, based on recent news disclosures).
 
    I place one adapter antenna (plugged onto its stand), on the table beside the kitchen PC, and the other standing behind the backyard scope laptop screen. My ASUS WiFi standard 2.4 GHZ channel communication suddenly jumps to a gratifying 300 mbps from the laptop’s cheap internal WiFi adapter standard chip  speed of about 65 to 85 mbps. Well worth the ~$50 (each).
 
    The other advantage of using the “extra” WiFi adapter, is that initially TV uses both product’s channels in parallel on the “same named” network, so if one (e.g. PC internal) signal reception drops, the other immediately picks up the data stream. Eventually, Win-10 or maybe it is TV, switches to the “faster IP link” of the two. My ASUS adapter launch app doesn’t always “auto-start” on PC boot – (or more often I forget to launch the ASUS WiFi app myself during scope session setup), so I launch TV via the standard laptop’s internal adapter Win-10 Network Connect icon, and once logged in,  launch the remote ASUS WiFi connection  app to activate the remote ASUS antenna. Then both WiFi and WiFi-2 each have a connection to the SAME local Wifi network name, via two different WiFi adapters – both are secure and both are local. Eventually, the faster local WiFi will take over. If I initially remember to launch the remote PC’s  ASUS adapter app at boot-up time, then I avoid the latter and just use the faster ASUS IP-address as the TV initial connection from the kitchen.
 
    Finally – about the TeamViewer Password.
    It is a hassle to note the ever changing, current TV secure “password of the day” at the backyard scope, every time you login via TeamViewer. However, you can use EXTRAS->OPTIONS->SECURITY ... and create a permanent key ... “Personal Password (for unattended access)”. Then, this won’t change after every TV logout. You can also add similar extra keys there using ... (Manage additional passwords) ... for one (or more) friends to join you concurrently on your night’s scope session, or AP tech support to use simultaneously with your own scope connection during problem debug, assuming AP has installed TeamViewer as well ( ... and they do).
 
    Hope this added info helps to “really optimize” your remote backyard TeamViewer connection. That’s really the best way to fly the AP mount through the night’s skies :-)
 
Joe Z.


Re: To PEC or not to PEC..

topboxman
 

Hi Rolando,

Your explanation is much better than mine.

The only drawback about spinning the spur gears with hand controller or third party software while mount is powered up is you may not be able to "feel" the tightness or looseness of the gears to see if the gears need remeshing unless you know a way. I have seen your instructions in your manuals about marking the spur gears with a pen so that you can return the spur gears to original location without affecting PEC if you rotate the spur gears by hand and the mount is powered off.

Thanks,
Peter


---In ap-gto@..., <chris1011@...> wrote :

Rotating the gears manually will lose the registration of the PE curve with respect to the gears. You can rotate them all you want with the drive buttons (on the keypad or other software/hardware). You just can't rotate the spur gears with the power off or when the mount is parked and the motors are not powered up.

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: pnagy@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...>
To: ap-gto <ap-gto@...>
Sent: Fri, Dec 7, 2018 3:34 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] Re: To PEC or not to PEC..



Correct me if I'm wrong.

In addition to Rolando's excellent comments, I would suggest to never manually rotate the spur gears inside the gearbox cover because it will lose PEC unless you know exactly where to rotate the spur gears back to original spot. I think many people don't realize this.

Peter


---In ap-gto@..., <chris1011@...> wrote :

..that is the question (apologies to the Bard)

Hi Astronuts,

We have been shipping out 1100 mounts in the present production run, and as most of you know the mounts are tested here and loaded with a PE curve into the CP4 memory. Our mount technician, Dave, spends a considerable amount of time testing the native PE of the mount. He then creates a very accurate and smooth PE curve and loads that curve back into the mount. The resultant accuracy with PE turned on is 1 arc sec Peak to Peak or less (Rms typically comes in under 0.2 arc sec). I just saw on Crowdy Nights where one of our new customers ignored the loaded curve and created his own right off the bat, under very poor conditions to boot. The resultant PE looks worse than with PE turned off!

When we send out these mounts, a very accurate PE curve is in memory and can be turned on by the user. It is very accurate and does not need to be updated, even though we also send you a copy of PEMPro so you can create your own PE curve to replace the one already in memory. Don't be in a big hurry to create your own PE curve and load it into the CP4 memory. By all means play with the software, measure the PE with and without compensation turned on and even create your own curve and compare it to the one that's factory loaded into memory (PEMPro allows you to do that), but DON'T just overwrite what is there in memory to begin with. In fact it's a good idea to bring the factory curve up with PEMPro and save it on your laptop. That way you can always load it back into the CP4 if your own curve doesn't work out.

On top of that, if you are going to create a PE curve, make sure that you have a good night with good stability where the stars don't pulsate or move around due to upper atmosphere disturbances. Then also follow instructions so that your resultant curve is smooth, because if you load a ragged curve into memory, all those pops and sniggles will be played back faithfully and impact your tracking and guiding in negative ways.

You have been handed a fine violin that was tuned to perfection by Dave, our expert tuner. So practice that Mozart concerto with the instrument as is, before turning it into a slack key guitar.

Rolando



Re: To PEC or not to PEC..

Roland Christen
 

Rotating the gears manually will lose the registration of the PE curve with respect to the gears. You can rotate them all you want with the drive buttons (on the keypad or other software/hardware). You just can't rotate the spur gears with the power off or when the mount is parked and the motors are not powered up.

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: pnagy@... [ap-gto]
To: ap-gto
Sent: Fri, Dec 7, 2018 3:34 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] Re: To PEC or not to PEC..



Correct me if I'm wrong.

In addition to Rolando's excellent comments, I would suggest to never manually rotate the spur gears inside the gearbox cover because it will lose PEC unless you know exactly where to rotate the spur gears back to original spot. I think many people don't realize this.

Peter


---In ap-gto@..., wrote :

..that is the question (apologies to the Bard)

Hi Astronuts,

We have been shipping out 1100 mounts in the present production run, and as most of you know the mounts are tested here and loaded with a PE curve into the CP4 memory. Our mount technician, Dave, spends a considerable amount of time testing the native PE of the mount. He then creates a very accurate and smooth PE curve and loads that curve back into the mount. The resultant accuracy with PE turned on is 1 arc sec Peak to Peak or less (Rms typically comes in under 0.2 arc sec). I just saw on Crowdy Nights where one of our new customers ignored the loaded curve and created his own right off the bat, under very poor conditions to boot. The resultant PE looks worse than with PE turned off!

When we send out these mounts, a very accurate PE curve is in memory and can be turned on by the user. It is very accurate and does not need to be updated, even though we also send you a copy of PEMPro so you can create your own PE curve to replace the one already in memory. Don't be in a big hurry to create your own PE curve and load it into the CP4 memory. By all means play with the software, measure the PE with and without compensation turned on and even create your own curve and compare it to the one that's factory loaded into memory (PEMPro allows you to do that), but DON'T just overwrite what is there in memory to begin with. In fact it's a good idea to bring the factory curve up with PEMPro and save it on your laptop. That way you can always load it back into the CP4 if your own curve doesn't work out.

On top of that, if you are going to create a PE curve, make sure that you have a good night with good stability where the stars don't pulsate or move around due to upper atmosphere disturbances. Then also follow instructions so that your resultant curve is smooth, because if you load a ragged curve into memory, all those pops and sniggles will be played back faithfully and impact your tracking and guiding in negative ways.

You have been handed a fine violin that was tuned to perfection by Dave, our expert tuner. So practice that Mozart concerto with the instrument as is, before turning it into a slack key guitar.

Rolando



Re: To PEC or not to PEC..

Roland Christen
 


I'm under the impression that's not possible in my particular case?
No you cannot in that case. Just make a new one.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: Dale Ghent daleg@... [ap-gto]
To: ap-gto
Sent: Fri, Dec 7, 2018 2:37 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] To PEC or not to PEC..



> On Dec 7, 2018, at 2:35 PM, chris1011@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
>
>
>
> All the data from these curves are stored here for future reference in case there are any questions about performance of a particular mount. If someone has a situation where they would like to restore their factory curve, we can download it in their CP4 over the internet.
>
> Rolando

With the exception for curves from CP3 boxes with Q or earlier chips, right?

I updated my CP3 from rev. O to V2, and I think my original PEC is unrecoverable due to chip changes after Q? If it *is* possible, I'd like to restore my original PEC to my V2-chipped CP3, but I'm under the impression that's not possible in my particular case?


/dale

------------------------------------
Posted by: Dale Ghent <daleg@...>
------------------------------------

To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list
see http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gto
------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gto/

<*> Your email settings:
    Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gto/join
    (Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
    ap-gto-digest@...
    ap-gto-fullfeatured@...

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
    ap-gto-unsubscribe@...

<*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
    https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/terms/


Re: To PEC or not to PEC..

topboxman
 

Correct me if I'm wrong.

In addition to Rolando's excellent comments, I would suggest to never manually rotate the spur gears inside the gearbox cover because it will lose PEC unless you know exactly where to rotate the spur gears back to original spot. I think many people don't realize this.

Peter


---In ap-gto@..., <chris1011@...> wrote :

..that is the question (apologies to the Bard)

Hi Astronuts,

We have been shipping out 1100 mounts in the present production run, and as most of you know the mounts are tested here and loaded with a PE curve into the CP4 memory. Our mount technician, Dave, spends a considerable amount of time testing the native PE of the mount. He then creates a very accurate and smooth PE curve and loads that curve back into the mount. The resultant accuracy with PE turned on is 1 arc sec Peak to Peak or less (Rms typically comes in under 0.2 arc sec). I just saw on Crowdy Nights where one of our new customers ignored the loaded curve and created his own right off the bat, under very poor conditions to boot. The resultant PE looks worse than with PE turned off!

When we send out these mounts, a very accurate PE curve is in memory and can be turned on by the user. It is very accurate and does not need to be updated, even though we also send you a copy of PEMPro so you can create your own PE curve to replace the one already in memory. Don't be in a big hurry to create your own PE curve and load it into the CP4 memory. By all means play with the software, measure the PE with and without compensation turned on and even create your own curve and compare it to the one that's factory loaded into memory (PEMPro allows you to do that), but DON'T just overwrite what is there in memory to begin with. In fact it's a good idea to bring the factory curve up with PEMPro and save it on your laptop. That way you can always load it back into the CP4 if your own curve doesn't work out.

On top of that, if you are going to create a PE curve, make sure that you have a good night with good stability where the stars don't pulsate or move around due to upper atmosphere disturbances. Then also follow instructions so that your resultant curve is smooth, because if you load a ragged curve into memory, all those pops and sniggles will be played back faithfully and impact your tracking and guiding in negative ways.

You have been handed a fine violin that was tuned to perfection by Dave, our expert tuner. So practice that Mozart concerto with the instrument as is, before turning it into a slack key guitar.

Rolando


Re: To PEC or not to PEC..

Stuart
 

Okay - good to know. Thanks Rolando. I will put loading a new PEC curve on my list of "things to do". 

Stuart

On Fri, 7 Dec 2018 at 15:35, chris1011@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

We ask for the serial number for our records. No, we did not load the CP3 curve into your CP4. The CP4 has a different memory with more data points, so the curves are not really compatible.

Rolando



-----Original Message-----
From: Stuart Heggie stuart.j.heggie@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...>
To: ap-gto <ap-gto@...>
Sent: Fri, Dec 7, 2018 2:21 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] To PEC or not to PEC..



Very interesting. Thanks Rolando!

Possibly a dumb question but when I upgraded my AP900GTO to CP4, it seemed important to know the serial # of my mount. I assumed it was to load my original PEC curve from your shop into my CP4. The mount tracked superbly before and still does. Is that just a reflection of overall quality or did your team indeed load my original PEC curve into my CP4?

Stuart

On Fri, 7 Dec 2018 at 13:58, chris1011@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@yahoogroups..com> wrote:
 
..that is the question (apologies to the Bard)

Hi Astronuts,

We have been shipping out 1100 mounts in the present production run, and as most of you know the mounts are tested here and loaded with a PE curve into the CP4 memory. Our mount technician, Dave, spends a considerable amount of time testing the native PE of the mount. He then creates a very accurate and smooth PE curve and loads that curve back into the mount. The resultant accuracy with PE turned on is 1 arc sec Peak to Peak or less (Rms typically comes in under 0.2 arc sec). I just saw on Crowdy Nights where one of our new customers ignored the loaded curve and created his own right off the bat, under very poor conditions to boot. The resultant PE looks worse than with PE turned off!

When we send out these mounts, a very accurate PE curve is in memory and can be turned on by the user. It is very accurate and does not need to be updated, even though we also send you a copy of PEMPro so you can create your own PE curve to replace the one already in memory. Don't be in a big hurry to create your own PE curve and load it into the CP4 memory. By all means play with the software, measure the PE with and without compensation turned on and even create your own curve and compare it to the one that's factory loaded into memory (PEMPro allows you to do that), but DON'T just overwrite what is there in memory to begin with. In fact it's a good idea to bring the factory curve up with PEMPro and save it on your laptop. That way you can always load it back into the CP4 if your own curve doesn't work out.

On top of that, if you are going to create a PE curve, make sure that you have a good night with good stability where the stars don't pulsate or move around due to upper atmosphere disturbances. Then also follow instructions so that your resultant curve is smooth, because if you load a ragged curve into memory, all those pops and sniggles will be played back faithfully and impact your tracking and guiding in negative ways.

You have been handed a fine violin that was tuned to perfection by Dave, our expert tuner. So practice that Mozart concerto with the instrument as is, before turning it into a slack key guitar.

Rolando


--