Date   

Re: More thoughts and observations regarding power supplies

C. G. Anderson
 


Re: Trouble Loading New CP4 Firmware

sbasprez
 

Howard,

My CP4 has firmware revision VCP4-P01-00.  Just to verify that you identified me correctly my serial number is CP4-0193.  Thanks for looking into this.

Greg


Re: More thoughts and observations regarding power supplies

Worsel
 

Ron

It's only 5 amps. Depending upon what you are trying to run that may be inadequate.

Bryan


---In ap-gto@..., <ronkramer1957@...> wrote :


Mount Sync/Recal Question

Wendelin Burkhardt
 

Is there a way to sync or recal on a set of RA/Dec coordinates that get entered into the hand controller?  I would like to use a plate solve solution to get my mount oriented after I get it polar aligned.



Re: Trouble Loading New CP4 Firmware

Howard Hedlund
 

I apologize for the delay.  Can both of you – Greg and John – please tell me what the “old” version of the GTOCP4 software is from which you are upgrading?   I am not sure what is going on, but I may need to provide an intermediate version for the upload.  Your CP4 serial numbers are close, so I’m guessing that the current software version in each unit may be the same.  The software that performs the load always comes from the older existing software.   I’ll be here a while yet.

 

Mag. 7 Skies!

 

Howard Hedlund

Astro-Physics, Inc.

Phone: 815-282-1513

www.astro-physics.com

Please include this e-mail with your response.

 

P Consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

 

 

From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...]
Sent: Wednesday, November 01, 2017 3:06 AM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: Trouble Loading New CP4 Firmware

 

 

Please post any response here so we can benefit from the information.  Thanks

 

Greg


Re: More thoughts and observations regarding power supplies

fl.lusen
 

Woody,

Do a google search on DC to DC converters.  You can get them to go from 12vDC to most anything.  It will also serve to isolate your camera from everything else that is on the 12v supply.

Fred

-----Original Message-----
From: 'Woody Schlom' woody@... [ap-gto]
To: A-P GOTO Mounts Yahoo Group
Sent: Tue, Oct 31, 2017 11:40 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] More thoughts and observations regarding power supplies

 
As some of you have already read, I sent my "bad" power supply to
Christopher in Hawaii and it tested OK for him. He said it's quite
warm, but otherwise OK. But I'm done with that one. It's already
ruined too many things for me.

And I'm not even sure I like it's older brother currently in my mobile
observatory -- even though that one has been working perfectly for
several years now. One of my problems with that particular brand and
model is the fact that there's no cooling fan. I like the silence and
simplicity, but I do a lot of solar observing in the Southern California
deserts and things can get quite warm just from ambient temperatures.
So I'm in the middle of re-powering both the mobile observatory as well
as my portable systems.

And thanks to the previous discussions here and research I've been doing
on my own, I've learned some "interesting" things regarding power
supplies.

1) I now have one of Powerwerx's variable power supplies. I like it so
far. It's small and seems to do what it's supposed to do. HOWEVER --
there's at least one potentially serious problem using it with a certain
camera.

2) My imaging camera is a QSI-683m/WSG/8. And similar to most astro
cameras, the power socket says "12v DC." No big deal, they almost all
say that. But since the Powerwerx power supplies put out 14.1v DC in
their "fixed" mode, I wanted to make sure the QSI was OK with that
voltage. Well, apparently NOT!

I don't usually trust or believe most of what's on Cloudy Nights, but
there's a thread discussing this very issue. And more than one poster
quoted a guy named "Dave" at QSI strongly recommending 12v DC ONLY! One
person even re-printed one of Dave's Emails regarding the question.
According to QSI's "Dave", the absolute upper voltage limit for the QSI
cameras is 14.0v. He said 13.8 is theoretically OK, but too close for
his comfort. And although he didn't say so, I assume 14.1v would void
the warranty.

But the even more interesting thing he said was that at voltages above
12v, the camera can't/doesn't cool as well -- because it's trying to
dissipate heat from the additional input voltage in addition to cooling
the camera. He recommends using the supplied QSI AC to 12v DC regulated
PS -- or inserting a regulated 12v to 12v DC PS between the camera and
any other nominal 12v source. This is for voltage regulation as well as
potential ground loop problems.

I tested my supplied QSI AC to DC regulated power supply and it's
putting out 12.30v with no-load.

Dave gave a link to a regulated 12v to 12v PS he approves of and it's
just a PC board -- with screw terminals -- for either $75 for the 25w
version or close to $90 for the 50w version. I can see why it's
probably a lot simpler and cheaper to go with the supplied QSI PS.

So I can use my new Powerwerx PS with my QSI camera, but I'll need to
crank down the output voltage to somewhere between 12.0 and 12.3v.

I'm sure glad I learned this BEFORE plugging 14.1v into my RIGrunner and
powering the camera from it -- which was my original plan.

3) And this brings me to the subject of RIGrunners. I have and use two
of them -- both 4005 models. A different "Dave" who is on this group,
mentioned that his RIGrunners which are controlled by USB, show a slight
voltage drop. This surprised me as I thought mine were passive. So I
tested one of my 4005 models. The PS I used was putting out 13.81v DC.
I got 13.81v at the input side of the 4005 and 13.81v at each of the
outputs. Whew. I'm not nuts. The 4005 really is passive. Apparently
it's just the fancier RIGrunners with internal circuits that slightly
drop voltage.

4) When I realized that my "new" PS was blowing things up and melting DC
cables, I ordered a new PS (different brand). Based on nothing more
than size, weight, the fact that it has two built-in PP sockets, an
adjustable "noise reduction" pot, a meter that shows voltage or
amperage, and the published specs., I purchased a TekPower TP30SWI.

This afternoon I conducted a few more tests on it. It works and I can't
find anything wrong with it. However, I don't like it because the fan
runs all the time. Granted, with no or low loads, the fan runs very
slowly. But I can still hear it -- and I don't like it. Some of my
uses are for public outreach where I need to listen and talk to the
public. And I don't like talking over fans. I already have to talk
over the fan in my old video PROCAMP and that's enough.

And the other problem I never anticipated with this PS is the analog
meter light. It's always ON. And it's WHITE!!!

So for those two reasons, I won't recommend this PS to anyone else.

5) I still haven't heard from Optec or MallinCam regarding operating
their equipment on 14.1v, but after learning about the QSI not wanting
14.1v, I'm now on my guard more than ever.

Woody


Re: More thoughts and observations regarding power supplies

Ron Kramer
 

On Wed, Nov 1, 2017 at 9:31 AM, Ron Kramer <ronkramer1957@...> wrote:
I wanted to power my rig from a 19v lithium battery from my drill. I bought a cheap "buck converter"... I can dial down the power from 19.2 to anything - even 0.  
It was around 6 bucks and has LCD read out for V and A.
I think I got it on ebay, but amazon has a good selection as well.


On Wed, Nov 1, 2017 at 12:49 AM, Chris Morley morleycs@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

It's cheap and not very elegant, but you could always insert a couple of appropriately rated (for the max current available) silicon diodes in series with the power supply's output.  Each one will drop the voltage by about 0.6 Volts, so instead of 14.1 volts, you should see about 12.9 volts.  

Chris

On Wed, Nov 1, 2017 at 3:40 PM, 'Woody Schlom' woody@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

As some of you have already read, I sent my "bad" power supply to
Christopher in Hawaii and it tested OK for him. He said it's quite
warm, but otherwise OK. But I'm done with that one. It's already
ruined too many things for me.

And I'm not even sure I like it's older brother currently in my mobile
observatory -- even though that one has been working perfectly for
several years now. One of my problems with that particular brand and
model is the fact that there's no cooling fan. I like the silence and
simplicity, but I do a lot of solar observing in the Southern California
deserts and things can get quite warm just from ambient temperatures.
So I'm in the middle of re-powering both the mobile observatory as well
as my portable systems.

And thanks to the previous discussions here and research I've been doing
on my own, I've learned some "interesting" things regarding power
supplies.

1) I now have one of Powerwerx's variable power supplies. I like it so
far. It's small and seems to do what it's supposed to do. HOWEVER --
there's at least one potentially serious problem using it with a certain
camera.

2) My imaging camera is a QSI-683m/WSG/8. And similar to most astro
cameras, the power socket says "12v DC." No big deal, they almost all
say that. But since the Powerwerx power supplies put out 14.1v DC in
their "fixed" mode, I wanted to make sure the QSI was OK with that
voltage. Well, apparently NOT!

I don't usually trust or believe most of what's on Cloudy Nights, but
there's a thread discussing this very issue. And more than one poster
quoted a guy named "Dave" at QSI strongly recommending 12v DC ONLY! One
person even re-printed one of Dave's Emails regarding the question.
According to QSI's "Dave", the absolute upper voltage limit for the QSI
cameras is 14.0v. He said 13.8 is theoretically OK, but too close for
his comfort. And although he didn't say so, I assume 14.1v would void
the warranty.

But the even more interesting thing he said was that at voltages above
12v, the camera can't/doesn't cool as well -- because it's trying to
dissipate heat from the additional input voltage in addition to cooling
the camera. He recommends using the supplied QSI AC to 12v DC regulated
PS -- or inserting a regulated 12v to 12v DC PS between the camera and
any other nominal 12v source. This is for voltage regulation as well as
potential ground loop problems.

I tested my supplied QSI AC to DC regulated power supply and it's
putting out 12.30v with no-load.

Dave gave a link to a regulated 12v to 12v PS he approves of and it's
just a PC board -- with screw terminals -- for either $75 for the 25w
version or close to $90 for the 50w version. I can see why it's
probably a lot simpler and cheaper to go with the supplied QSI PS.

So I can use my new Powerwerx PS with my QSI camera, but I'll need to
crank down the output voltage to somewhere between 12.0 and 12.3v.

I'm sure glad I learned this BEFORE plugging 14.1v into my RIGrunner and
powering the camera from it -- which was my original plan.

3) And this brings me to the subject of RIGrunners. I have and use two
of them -- both 4005 models. A different "Dave" who is on this group,
mentioned that his RIGrunners which are controlled by USB, show a slight
voltage drop. This surprised me as I thought mine were passive. So I
tested one of my 4005 models. The PS I used was putting out 13.81v DC.
I got 13.81v at the input side of the 4005 and 13.81v at each of the
outputs. Whew. I'm not nuts. The 4005 really is passive. Apparently
it's just the fancier RIGrunners with internal circuits that slightly
drop voltage.

4) When I realized that my "new" PS was blowing things up and melting DC
cables, I ordered a new PS (different brand). Based on nothing more
than size, weight, the fact that it has two built-in PP sockets, an
adjustable "noise reduction" pot, a meter that shows voltage or
amperage, and the published specs., I purchased a TekPower TP30SWI.

This afternoon I conducted a few more tests on it. It works and I can't
find anything wrong with it. However, I don't like it because the fan
runs all the time. Granted, with no or low loads, the fan runs very
slowly. But I can still hear it -- and I don't like it. Some of my
uses are for public outreach where I need to listen and talk to the
public. And I don't like talking over fans. I already have to talk
over the fan in my old video PROCAMP and that's enough.

And the other problem I never anticipated with this PS is the analog
meter light. It's always ON. And it's WHITE!!!

So for those two reasons, I won't recommend this PS to anyone else.

5) I still haven't heard from Optec or MallinCam regarding operating
their equipment on 14.1v, but after learning about the QSI not wanting
14.1v, I'm now on my guard more than ever.

Woody





Re: More thoughts and observations regarding power supplies

Ron Kramer
 

I wanted to power my rig from a 19v lithium battery from my drill. I bought a cheap "buck converter"... I can dial down the power from 19.2 to anything - even 0.  
It was around 6 bucks and has LCD read out for V and A.
I think I got it on ebay, but amazon has a good selection as well.


On Wed, Nov 1, 2017 at 12:49 AM, Chris Morley morleycs@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

It's cheap and not very elegant, but you could always insert a couple of appropriately rated (for the max current available) silicon diodes in series with the power supply's output.  Each one will drop the voltage by about 0.6 Volts, so instead of 14.1 volts, you should see about 12.9 volts.  

Chris

On Wed, Nov 1, 2017 at 3:40 PM, 'Woody Schlom' woody@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

As some of you have already read, I sent my "bad" power supply to
Christopher in Hawaii and it tested OK for him. He said it's quite
warm, but otherwise OK. But I'm done with that one. It's already
ruined too many things for me.

And I'm not even sure I like it's older brother currently in my mobile
observatory -- even though that one has been working perfectly for
several years now. One of my problems with that particular brand and
model is the fact that there's no cooling fan. I like the silence and
simplicity, but I do a lot of solar observing in the Southern California
deserts and things can get quite warm just from ambient temperatures.
So I'm in the middle of re-powering both the mobile observatory as well
as my portable systems.

And thanks to the previous discussions here and research I've been doing
on my own, I've learned some "interesting" things regarding power
supplies.

1) I now have one of Powerwerx's variable power supplies. I like it so
far. It's small and seems to do what it's supposed to do. HOWEVER --
there's at least one potentially serious problem using it with a certain
camera.

2) My imaging camera is a QSI-683m/WSG/8. And similar to most astro
cameras, the power socket says "12v DC." No big deal, they almost all
say that. But since the Powerwerx power supplies put out 14.1v DC in
their "fixed" mode, I wanted to make sure the QSI was OK with that
voltage. Well, apparently NOT!

I don't usually trust or believe most of what's on Cloudy Nights, but
there's a thread discussing this very issue. And more than one poster
quoted a guy named "Dave" at QSI strongly recommending 12v DC ONLY! One
person even re-printed one of Dave's Emails regarding the question.
According to QSI's "Dave", the absolute upper voltage limit for the QSI
cameras is 14.0v. He said 13.8 is theoretically OK, but too close for
his comfort. And although he didn't say so, I assume 14.1v would void
the warranty.

But the even more interesting thing he said was that at voltages above
12v, the camera can't/doesn't cool as well -- because it's trying to
dissipate heat from the additional input voltage in addition to cooling
the camera. He recommends using the supplied QSI AC to 12v DC regulated
PS -- or inserting a regulated 12v to 12v DC PS between the camera and
any other nominal 12v source. This is for voltage regulation as well as
potential ground loop problems.

I tested my supplied QSI AC to DC regulated power supply and it's
putting out 12.30v with no-load.

Dave gave a link to a regulated 12v to 12v PS he approves of and it's
just a PC board -- with screw terminals -- for either $75 for the 25w
version or close to $90 for the 50w version. I can see why it's
probably a lot simpler and cheaper to go with the supplied QSI PS.

So I can use my new Powerwerx PS with my QSI camera, but I'll need to
crank down the output voltage to somewhere between 12.0 and 12.3v.

I'm sure glad I learned this BEFORE plugging 14.1v into my RIGrunner and
powering the camera from it -- which was my original plan.

3) And this brings me to the subject of RIGrunners. I have and use two
of them -- both 4005 models. A different "Dave" who is on this group,
mentioned that his RIGrunners which are controlled by USB, show a slight
voltage drop. This surprised me as I thought mine were passive. So I
tested one of my 4005 models. The PS I used was putting out 13.81v DC.
I got 13.81v at the input side of the 4005 and 13.81v at each of the
outputs. Whew. I'm not nuts. The 4005 really is passive. Apparently
it's just the fancier RIGrunners with internal circuits that slightly
drop voltage.

4) When I realized that my "new" PS was blowing things up and melting DC
cables, I ordered a new PS (different brand). Based on nothing more
than size, weight, the fact that it has two built-in PP sockets, an
adjustable "noise reduction" pot, a meter that shows voltage or
amperage, and the published specs., I purchased a TekPower TP30SWI.

This afternoon I conducted a few more tests on it. It works and I can't
find anything wrong with it. However, I don't like it because the fan
runs all the time. Granted, with no or low loads, the fan runs very
slowly. But I can still hear it -- and I don't like it. Some of my
uses are for public outreach where I need to listen and talk to the
public. And I don't like talking over fans. I already have to talk
over the fan in my old video PROCAMP and that's enough.

And the other problem I never anticipated with this PS is the analog
meter light. It's always ON. And it's WHITE!!!

So for those two reasons, I won't recommend this PS to anyone else.

5) I still haven't heard from Optec or MallinCam regarding operating
their equipment on 14.1v, but after learning about the QSI not wanting
14.1v, I'm now on my guard more than ever.

Woody




Re: 1100GTO Reduction Spur Gear-set Play Adjustment

sbasprez
 

Rolando,

Thanks for the nearly immediate feedback!  I will back off the RA a bit and keep an eye on the smoothness of the Dec motion and back off if needed

Greg.


Re: More thoughts and observations regarding power supplies

vk3cjk
 

It's cheap and not very elegant, but you could always insert a couple of appropriately rated (for the max current available) silicon diodes in series with the power supply's output.  Each one will drop the voltage by about 0.6 Volts, so instead of 14.1 volts, you should see about 12.9 volts.  

Chris

On Wed, Nov 1, 2017 at 3:40 PM, 'Woody Schlom' woody@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

As some of you have already read, I sent my "bad" power supply to
Christopher in Hawaii and it tested OK for him. He said it's quite
warm, but otherwise OK. But I'm done with that one. It's already
ruined too many things for me.

And I'm not even sure I like it's older brother currently in my mobile
observatory -- even though that one has been working perfectly for
several years now. One of my problems with that particular brand and
model is the fact that there's no cooling fan. I like the silence and
simplicity, but I do a lot of solar observing in the Southern California
deserts and things can get quite warm just from ambient temperatures.
So I'm in the middle of re-powering both the mobile observatory as well
as my portable systems.

And thanks to the previous discussions here and research I've been doing
on my own, I've learned some "interesting" things regarding power
supplies.

1) I now have one of Powerwerx's variable power supplies. I like it so
far. It's small and seems to do what it's supposed to do. HOWEVER --
there's at least one potentially serious problem using it with a certain
camera.

2) My imaging camera is a QSI-683m/WSG/8. And similar to most astro
cameras, the power socket says "12v DC." No big deal, they almost all
say that. But since the Powerwerx power supplies put out 14.1v DC in
their "fixed" mode, I wanted to make sure the QSI was OK with that
voltage. Well, apparently NOT!

I don't usually trust or believe most of what's on Cloudy Nights, but
there's a thread discussing this very issue. And more than one poster
quoted a guy named "Dave" at QSI strongly recommending 12v DC ONLY! One
person even re-printed one of Dave's Emails regarding the question.
According to QSI's "Dave", the absolute upper voltage limit for the QSI
cameras is 14.0v. He said 13.8 is theoretically OK, but too close for
his comfort. And although he didn't say so, I assume 14.1v would void
the warranty.

But the even more interesting thing he said was that at voltages above
12v, the camera can't/doesn't cool as well -- because it's trying to
dissipate heat from the additional input voltage in addition to cooling
the camera. He recommends using the supplied QSI AC to 12v DC regulated
PS -- or inserting a regulated 12v to 12v DC PS between the camera and
any other nominal 12v source. This is for voltage regulation as well as
potential ground loop problems.

I tested my supplied QSI AC to DC regulated power supply and it's
putting out 12.30v with no-load.

Dave gave a link to a regulated 12v to 12v PS he approves of and it's
just a PC board -- with screw terminals -- for either $75 for the 25w
version or close to $90 for the 50w version. I can see why it's
probably a lot simpler and cheaper to go with the supplied QSI PS.

So I can use my new Powerwerx PS with my QSI camera, but I'll need to
crank down the output voltage to somewhere between 12.0 and 12.3v.

I'm sure glad I learned this BEFORE plugging 14.1v into my RIGrunner and
powering the camera from it -- which was my original plan.

3) And this brings me to the subject of RIGrunners. I have and use two
of them -- both 4005 models. A different "Dave" who is on this group,
mentioned that his RIGrunners which are controlled by USB, show a slight
voltage drop. This surprised me as I thought mine were passive. So I
tested one of my 4005 models. The PS I used was putting out 13.81v DC.
I got 13.81v at the input side of the 4005 and 13.81v at each of the
outputs. Whew. I'm not nuts. The 4005 really is passive. Apparently
it's just the fancier RIGrunners with internal circuits that slightly
drop voltage.

4) When I realized that my "new" PS was blowing things up and melting DC
cables, I ordered a new PS (different brand). Based on nothing more
than size, weight, the fact that it has two built-in PP sockets, an
adjustable "noise reduction" pot, a meter that shows voltage or
amperage, and the published specs., I purchased a TekPower TP30SWI.

This afternoon I conducted a few more tests on it. It works and I can't
find anything wrong with it. However, I don't like it because the fan
runs all the time. Granted, with no or low loads, the fan runs very
slowly. But I can still hear it -- and I don't like it. Some of my
uses are for public outreach where I need to listen and talk to the
public. And I don't like talking over fans. I already have to talk
over the fan in my old video PROCAMP and that's enough.

And the other problem I never anticipated with this PS is the analog
meter light. It's always ON. And it's WHITE!!!

So for those two reasons, I won't recommend this PS to anyone else.

5) I still haven't heard from Optec or MallinCam regarding operating
their equipment on 14.1v, but after learning about the QSI not wanting
14.1v, I'm now on my guard more than ever.

Woody



More thoughts and observations regarding power supplies

Woody Schlom <woody@...>
 

As some of you have already read, I sent my "bad" power supply to
Christopher in Hawaii and it tested OK for him. He said it's quite
warm, but otherwise OK. But I'm done with that one. It's already
ruined too many things for me.

And I'm not even sure I like it's older brother currently in my mobile
observatory -- even though that one has been working perfectly for
several years now. One of my problems with that particular brand and
model is the fact that there's no cooling fan. I like the silence and
simplicity, but I do a lot of solar observing in the Southern California
deserts and things can get quite warm just from ambient temperatures.
So I'm in the middle of re-powering both the mobile observatory as well
as my portable systems.

And thanks to the previous discussions here and research I've been doing
on my own, I've learned some "interesting" things regarding power
supplies.

1) I now have one of Powerwerx's variable power supplies. I like it so
far. It's small and seems to do what it's supposed to do. HOWEVER --
there's at least one potentially serious problem using it with a certain
camera.

2) My imaging camera is a QSI-683m/WSG/8. And similar to most astro
cameras, the power socket says "12v DC." No big deal, they almost all
say that. But since the Powerwerx power supplies put out 14.1v DC in
their "fixed" mode, I wanted to make sure the QSI was OK with that
voltage. Well, apparently NOT!

I don't usually trust or believe most of what's on Cloudy Nights, but
there's a thread discussing this very issue. And more than one poster
quoted a guy named "Dave" at QSI strongly recommending 12v DC ONLY! One
person even re-printed one of Dave's Emails regarding the question.
According to QSI's "Dave", the absolute upper voltage limit for the QSI
cameras is 14.0v. He said 13.8 is theoretically OK, but too close for
his comfort. And although he didn't say so, I assume 14.1v would void
the warranty.

But the even more interesting thing he said was that at voltages above
12v, the camera can't/doesn't cool as well -- because it's trying to
dissipate heat from the additional input voltage in addition to cooling
the camera. He recommends using the supplied QSI AC to 12v DC regulated
PS -- or inserting a regulated 12v to 12v DC PS between the camera and
any other nominal 12v source. This is for voltage regulation as well as
potential ground loop problems.

I tested my supplied QSI AC to DC regulated power supply and it's
putting out 12.30v with no-load.

Dave gave a link to a regulated 12v to 12v PS he approves of and it's
just a PC board -- with screw terminals -- for either $75 for the 25w
version or close to $90 for the 50w version. I can see why it's
probably a lot simpler and cheaper to go with the supplied QSI PS.

So I can use my new Powerwerx PS with my QSI camera, but I'll need to
crank down the output voltage to somewhere between 12.0 and 12.3v.

I'm sure glad I learned this BEFORE plugging 14.1v into my RIGrunner and
powering the camera from it -- which was my original plan.

3) And this brings me to the subject of RIGrunners. I have and use two
of them -- both 4005 models. A different "Dave" who is on this group,
mentioned that his RIGrunners which are controlled by USB, show a slight
voltage drop. This surprised me as I thought mine were passive. So I
tested one of my 4005 models. The PS I used was putting out 13.81v DC.
I got 13.81v at the input side of the 4005 and 13.81v at each of the
outputs. Whew. I'm not nuts. The 4005 really is passive. Apparently
it's just the fancier RIGrunners with internal circuits that slightly
drop voltage.

4) When I realized that my "new" PS was blowing things up and melting DC
cables, I ordered a new PS (different brand). Based on nothing more
than size, weight, the fact that it has two built-in PP sockets, an
adjustable "noise reduction" pot, a meter that shows voltage or
amperage, and the published specs., I purchased a TekPower TP30SWI.

This afternoon I conducted a few more tests on it. It works and I can't
find anything wrong with it. However, I don't like it because the fan
runs all the time. Granted, with no or low loads, the fan runs very
slowly. But I can still hear it -- and I don't like it. Some of my
uses are for public outreach where I need to listen and talk to the
public. And I don't like talking over fans. I already have to talk
over the fan in my old video PROCAMP and that's enough.

And the other problem I never anticipated with this PS is the analog
meter light. It's always ON. And it's WHITE!!!

So for those two reasons, I won't recommend this PS to anyone else.

5) I still haven't heard from Optec or MallinCam regarding operating
their equipment on 14.1v, but after learning about the QSI not wanting
14.1v, I'm now on my guard more than ever.

Woody


Re: 1100GTO Reduction Spur Gear-set Play Adjustment

Roland Christen
 


For the heck of it I opened up the RA gearbox and found that it too had significant backlash, though less at about 2.5 teeth of motion.  I went ahead and adjusted the gearbox and then the worm mesh and verified full 360 operation.  Of course, in theory, this should have no effect on guiding as long as the guide sped is 1 or below.
What you did for Dec will reduce the backlash, but don't be too aggressive. For RA I would leave a bit more clearance so that the gears run smooth. If they are too tight you may get slightly worse moment to moment tracking. A little gearbox backlash will not affect tracking or guiding in RA whatsoever.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: beneckerus@... [ap-gto]
To: ap-gto
Sent: Tue, Oct 31, 2017 11:30 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] 1100GTO Reduction Spur Gear-set Play Adjustment



I have experienced greater declination backlash from day one in my 1100GTO purchased new in December of 2015 than I would have anticipated.  I have played around with adjusting the worm mesh using both the slewing and park 3 push on the gearbox methods, but have not seen any significant change in the behavior.  I do not feel any backlash when I try to wiggle the declination axis, so I believe the preload on the worm bearing is adequately tight.

The leaves the reduction spur gear-set as the next possible source of backlash.  I took the cover off of the gear box and indeed I found that there was about 3 teeth worth of play at the small gear on the motor shaft.  I removed the intermediate gear with the three holes spaced 120 degrees apart and discovered what the holes are for.  The position of the pivot point of this gear is adjustable and the hex head screw that locks the pivot position in place is accessed t hrough these holes.  With the gear in place I rotated the gear to allow the hex wrench to loosen the screw.  Using rotation of the motor shaft gear in one direction or the other tightens or loosens the lash of the gear-set.  I was able to take out virtually all the lash without the gears binding.  I then readjusted the worm mesh and ran the axis through 360 degrees to verify there was no binding anywhere in the full range of motion.

For the heck of it I opened up the RA gearbox and found that it too had significant backlash, though less at about 2.5 teeth of motion.  I went ahead and adjusted the gearbox and then the worm mesh and verified full 360 operation.  Of course, in theory, this should have no effect on guiding as long as the guide sped is 1 or below.

The proof is in the pudding, but of course the weather here is going to be bad for at least the next week, so it will be a while before I w ill know if this has any positive effect on the declination issue.  I have not found anything about making this adjustment on the 1100GTO on this site or the AP site.  But I did find a link on this site to AP instructions on various adjustments on the 1200GTO, but not the reduction spur gear-set play.  Here is the link:  http://www.astro-physics.com/tech_support/mounts/1200gto/Gear%20Mesh%201200.pdf.  At least it defines the proper terminology to use for various aspects and does show some other possible sources of lash that could be seen in other models as well.

I will post with results when I finally to get suitable conditions.  I am interested if anyone out there has played with this adjustment.  It is not clear that this adjustment is possible on other models, and may be a refinement first incorporated on the 1100GTO.  I had been looking at retrofitting with the self-adjusting worm gear boxes, but if this results in the kind of improvement I think is possible, I may not need that.  It would be interesting to compare the performance in this regard to the original like mine and the latest version.

Greg






1100GTO Reduction Spur Gear-set Play Adjustment

sbasprez
 

I have experienced greater declination backlash from day one in my 1100GTO purchased new in December of 2015 than I would have anticipated.  I have played around with adjusting the worm mesh using both the slewing and park 3 push on the gearbox methods, but have not seen any significant change in the behavior.  I do not feel any backlash when I try to wiggle the declination axis, so I believe the preload on the worm bearing is adequately tight.


The leaves the reduction spur gear-set as the next possible source of backlash.  I took the cover off of the gear box and indeed I found that there was about 3 teeth worth of play at the small gear on the motor shaft.  I removed the intermediate gear with the three holes spaced 120 degrees apart and discovered what the holes are for.  The position of the pivot point of this gear is adjustable and the hex head screw that locks the pivot position in place is accessed through these holes.  With the gear in place I rotated the gear to allow the hex wrench to loosen the screw.  Using rotation of the motor shaft gear in one direction or the other tightens or loosens the lash of the gear-set.  I was able to take out virtually all the lash without the gears binding.  I then readjusted the worm mesh and ran the axis through 360 degrees to verify there was no binding anywhere in the full range of motion.

For the heck of it I opened up the RA gearbox and found that it too had significant backlash, though less at about 2.5 teeth of motion.  I went ahead and adjusted the gearbox and then the worm mesh and verified full 360 operation.  Of course, in theory, this should have no effect on guiding as long as the guide sped is 1 or below.

The proof is in the pudding, but of course the weather here is going to be bad for at least the next week, so it will be a while before I will know if this has any positive effect on the declination issue.  I have not found anything about making this adjustment on the 1100GTO on this site or the AP site.  But I did find a link on this site to AP instructions on various adjustments on the 1200GTO, but not the reduction spur gear-set play.  Here is the link:  http://www.astro-physics.com/tech_support/mounts/1200gto/Gear%20Mesh%201200.pdf.  At least it defines the proper terminology to use for various aspects and does show some other possible sources of lash that could be seen in other models as well.

I will post with results when I finally to get suitable conditions.  I am interested if anyone out there has played with this adjustment.  It is not clear that this adjustment is possible on other models, and may be a refinement first incorporated on the 1100GTO.  I had been looking at retrofitting with the self-adjusting worm gear boxes, but if this results in the kind of improvement I think is possible, I may not need that.  It would be interesting to compare the performance in this regard to the original like mine and the latest version.

Greg




Re: Trouble Loading New CP4 Firmware

sbasprez
 

Please post any response here so we can benefit from the information.  Thanks

Greg


Re: Trouble Loading New CP4 Firmware

Roland Christen
 


I have emailed AP's tech support a couple of times but still haven't heard back
You have e-mailed tech support and not gotten any response? Can you forward those e-mails to me: roland@.... I will pass them to the person in charge. You should be able to get an answer same day.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: john.mccall@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...>
To: ap-gto
Sent: Tue, Oct 31, 2017 6:23 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] Re: Trouble Loading New CP4 Firmware



Greg,

Good to know I am not the only one experiencing this problem! I am seeing exactly the same behavior as you - the only difference is that I disconnected the USB cable before starting the update.

I have emailed AP's tech support a couple of times but still haven't heard back. Let's hope someone in the group here can help us resolve the problem.

John



Re: Guiding a mach1 - and pec?

Andy Galasso
 

On Tue, Oct 31, 2017 at 2:16 PM, Ron Kramer ronkramer1957@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

Not sure how else I can 'cut the cord' so to speak.

In PHD2 there's a check-box labeled "Enable mount guide output" on the Guiding tab of the Advanced settings window (click the brain button).  You can leave your aggressiveness setting alone and just use the check-box to "cut the cord".  Also, the Guiding Assistant in PHD2 will automatically disable guide output and re-enable it when it is done. After running the Guiding Assistant the PHD2 Guide Log will have the un-guided tracking information that Rolando is looking for. Either approach--running the Guiding Assistant or manually clearing the check-box-- will get the un-guided tracking data into the log, and you'll also see it on the graph window display.

BTW, if you were not already aware of it there is a dedicated PHD2 Forum where you can go for PHD2-related questions.

Andy


Re: Trouble Loading New CP4 Firmware

John McCall
 

Greg,

Good to know I am not the only one experiencing this problem! I am seeing exactly the same behavior as you - the only difference is that I disconnected the USB cable before starting the update.

I have emailed AP's tech support a couple of times but still haven't heard back. Let's hope someone in the group here can help us resolve the problem.

John


Re: Guiding a mach1 - and pec?

Ron Kramer
 

Will do. (waiting for stars). RA to 0.  If I can't set 0.  If I can't,  I do not have a guide cable.  I have a guide camera, USB to computer and I believe the guiding is then passed
along through software to phd2 and PHD2 controls the mount.  Not sure how else I can 'cut the cord' so to speak.
Sorry for being so naive about this stuff - I just started in this last April. Guiding was around July. Then all new mount and software a month ago.



On Tue, Oct 31, 2017 at 1:11 PM, chris1011@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

I did try to set DEC to 0 - as per your suggestion before but it wouldn't stick - it changed to 1  (is that ok?)
I don't know what you mean by setting DEC to 0.

What I said below was to set the guide aggressiveness in RA to zero in order to see what the actual periodic error is with PEM off. Then do the same with PEM on. Do each one for about 10 minutes which is just over one worm cycle. Then post the guider graph so we can see it. If your guider program cannot set aggressiveness to zero, then just pull the guider connection to the mount out so that guide signals are not sent to the mount.

To determine if you are properly polar aligned you can also do the same with Dec. Turn off Dec corrections but record the guide star drift in your guider graph. That will tell you infinitely more than just guiding. If your Dec drift is more than 1 arc sec for a 5 minute period, then your polar alignment is not good.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: Ron Kramer ronkramer1957@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...>
To: ap-gto <ap-gto@...>
Sent: Mon, Oct 30, 2017 8:39 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Guiding a mach1 - and pec?



thanks I'll try this next clear night.
I did try to set DEC to 0 - as per your suggestion before but it wouldn't stick - it changed to 1  (is that ok?)
You say do this for both axis then. Will do.

I assumed that teh "start" of the pec curve would change if he contact with the worm changed place.
I'll figure that's wrong.

Will do. Don't give me to much at once. My memory is shot. I'll likely print the above out and get that step done.



On Mon, Oct 30, 2017 at 7:24 PM, chris1011@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

Frustrated , I wondered about PEC.  It was on, and I read it's "recorded" at the shop and to leave it be... it's set.  Well if I disengaged the worm gears (as I do this to balance with no drag) would not the pec be "off"?
No, disengaging the worm from the worm wheel does not change the PE corrections.

I think you are grasping at straws. Please read my other post about polar alignment - try to get it as good as possible so that the guiding program does not need to fight your misalignment drift.

PLEASE read the following and try it (for your sake and the rest of us who are trying to help):

If you have any doubts about the tracking accuracy do this: TURN OFF the guide corrections to the mount by turning the aggressiveness to zero. Your guider will still record the motion of the guide star and will show you the slow drift back and forth of the RA axis caused by PE AND the steady drift up or down of both RA and Dec due to polar misalignment. Once you have that data, take a screen shot and save it, or post it somewhere so we can all see what your basic mount is actually doing sans the complications of the guiding software corrections. THEN do it all again but this time turn on the PE corrections. You should see a marked improvement of the RA wiggles back and forth because the PEM will be correcting most of that and you should have only the steady drift due to polar misalignment. Both of these tests should take 10 minutes at most (one complete worm cycle).

Now you actually have something to work with instead of the performance below that is mixed up with corrections that may or may not be correct. The other advantage to the above test is that it can show you exactly what to do to precision align your mount on the pole. If you want, I can explain again how that is done, and believe it or not, it is really quite simple and straight forward. It is well worth doing drift alignment and need not be difficult at all and take very little time.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: ronkramer1957@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...>
To: ap-gto <ap-gto@...>
Sent: Mon, Oct 30, 2017 6:09 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] Guiding a mach1 - and pec?



I've now had my 2nd night of stars since my Mach1 arrived. I wanted to concentrate on guiding (since that is why I upgraded from the NEQ6).

I carefully balanced the scope.  Calibrated (PHD2) near meridian/ecliptic.

guiding didn't look good at that location. I moved to another area and wasn't much better. 

Seeing I suspect was horrible. (I Could see a hazy icy ring out around the moon). Maybe that's why it was bad?   So I tried guide assistant in PHD2 (I don't think it uses seeing as it doesn't do actual guiding)? 

The results I think? were very good? 


Hoping my photo will appear above?

Though that seemed to report good things, guiding was very abrupt and lots of zig zags.  Like OVER correcting...  Though I ended up with Dec agression at  9.  (yea... 9).  Could that be normal? 

I was doing 4 second exposures as was recommended here.  HOWEVER I find it very difficult to do this or longer as my camera's gain is already turned down to 10 in order not to over saturate the guide star (and I still get saturation warnings at that).  Any other way to turn down sensitivity so allow 5 second exposures as recommended by Roland?   (ASI290MM)  ND filter added to camera? 

Frustrated , I wondered about PEC.  It was on, and I read it's "recorded" at the shop and to leave it be... it's set.  Well if I disengaged the worm gears (as I do this to balance with no drag) would not the pec be "off"?  Turning pec OFF - looked better...  I did then click RECORD and watched guiding which was a bit better without PEC.  Later I noticed it was engaged again. (once recorded does it then apply that recorded error?)  

I then was getting a lot of star lost errors (I think high thin clouds) as I was in a small gap in days of rain.  Advice?  Wait and try again? the GA feedback is good?   what about PEC.  I read somewhere on here about uploading it to the mount?  Id I recorded it - didn't it auto apply it? 









Re: Guiding a mach1 - and pec?

Roland Christen
 

I did try to set DEC to 0 - as per your suggestion before but it wouldn't stick - it changed to 1  (is that ok?)
I don't know what you mean by setting DEC to 0.

What I said below was to set the guide aggressiveness in RA to zero in order to see what the actual periodic error is with PEM off. Then do the same with PEM on. Do each one for about 10 minutes which is just over one worm cycle. Then post the guider graph so we can see it. If your guider program cannot set aggressiveness to zero, then just pull the guider connection to the mount out so that guide signals are not sent to the mount.

To determine if you are properly polar aligned you can also do the same with Dec. Turn off Dec corrections but record the guide star drift in your guider graph. That will tell you infinitely more than just guiding. If your Dec drift is more than 1 arc sec for a 5 minute period, then your polar alignment is not good.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: Ron Kramer ronkramer1957@... [ap-gto]
To: ap-gto
Sent: Mon, Oct 30, 2017 8:39 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Guiding a mach1 - and pec?



thanks I'll try this next clear night.
I did try to set DEC to 0 - as per your suggestion before but it wouldn't stick - it changed to 1  (is that ok?)
You say do this for both axis then. Will do.

I assumed that teh "start" of the pec curve would change if he contact with the worm changed place.
I'll figure that's wrong.

Will do. Don't give me to much at once. My memory is shot. I'll likely print the above out and get that step done.



On Mon, Oct 30, 2017 at 7:24 PM, chris1011@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

Frustrated , I wondered about PEC.  It was on, and I read it's "recorded" at the shop and to leave it be... it's set.  Well if I disengaged the worm gears (as I do this to balance with no drag) would not the pec be "off"?
No, disengaging the worm from the worm wheel does not change the PE corrections.

I think you are grasping at straws. Please read my other post about polar alignment - try to get it as good as possible so that the guiding program does not need to fight your misalignment drift.

PLEASE read the following and try it (for your sake and the rest of us who are trying to help):

If you have any doubts about the tracking accuracy do this: TURN OFF the guide corrections to the mount by turning the aggressiveness to zero. Your guider will still record the motion of the guide star and will show you the slow drift back and forth of the RA axis caused by PE AND the steady drift up or down of both RA and Dec due to polar misalignment. Once you have that data, take a screen shot and save it, or post it somewhere so we can all see what your basic mount is actually doing sans the complications of the guiding software corrections. THEN do it all again but this time turn on the PE corrections. You should see a marked improvement of the RA wiggles back and forth because the PEM will be correcting most of that and you should have only the steady drift due to polar misalignment. Both of these tests should take 10 minutes at most (one complete worm cycle).

Now you actually have something to work with instead of the performance below that is mixed up with corrections that may or may not be correct. The other advantage to the above test is that it can show you exactly what to do to precision align your mount on the pole. If you want, I can explain again how that is done, and believe it or not, it is really quite simple and straight forward. It is well worth doing drift alignment and need not be difficult at all and take very little time.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: ronkramer1957@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...>
To: ap-gto <ap-gto@...>
Sent: Mon, Oct 30, 2017 6:09 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] Guiding a mach1 - and pec?



I've now had my 2nd night of stars since my Mach1 arrived. I wanted to concentrate on guiding (since that is why I upgraded from the NEQ6).

I carefully balanced the scope.  Calibrated (PHD2) near meridian/ecliptic.

guiding didn't look good at that location. I moved to another area and wasn't much better. 

Seeing I suspect was horrible. (I Could see a hazy icy ring out around the moon). Maybe that's why it was bad?   So I tried guide assistant in PHD2 (I don't think it uses seeing as it doesn't do actual guiding)? 

The results I think? were very good? 


Hoping my photo will appear above?

Though that seemed to report good things, guiding was very abrupt and lots of zig zags.  Like OVER correcting...  Though I ended up with Dec agression at  9.  (yea... 9).  Could that be normal? 

I was doing 4 second exposures as was recommended here.  HOWEVER I find it very difficult to do this or longer as my camera's gain is already turned down to 10 in order not to over saturate the guide star (and I still get saturation warnings at that).  Any other way to turn down sensitivity so allow 5 second exposures as recommended by Roland?   (ASI290MM)  ND filter added to camera? 

Frustrated , I wondered about PEC.  It was on, and I read it's "recorded" at the shop and to leave it be... it's set.  Well if I disengaged the worm gears (as I do this to balance with no drag) would not the pec be "off"?  Turning pec OFF - looked better...  I did then click RECORD and watched guiding which was a bit better without PEC.  Later I noticed it was engaged again. (once recorded does it then apply that recorded error?)  

I then was getting a lot of star lost errors (I think high thin clouds) as I was in a small gap in days of rain.  Advice?  Wait and try again? the GA feedback is good?   what about PEC.  I read somewhere on here about uploading it to the mount?  Id I recorded it - didn't it auto apply it? 








Re: Guiding a mach1 - and pec?

Roland Christen
 


I did try to set DEC to 0 - as per your suggestion before but it wouldn't stick - it changed to 1  (is that ok?)
I don't know what you mean by setting DEC to 0.

What I said below was to set the guide aggressiveness in RA to zero in order to see what the actual periodic error is with PEM off. Then do the same with PEM on. Do each one for about 10 minutes which is just over one worm cycle. Then post the guider graph so we can see it. If your guider program cannot set aggressiveness to zero, then just pull the guider connection to the mount out so that guide signals are not sent to the mount. Otherwise what's the point of doing this?

To determine if you are properly polar aligned you can also do the same with Dec - turn off Dec corrections but record the guide star drift in your guider graph. That will tell you infinitely more than just guiding. If your Dec drift is more than 1 arc sec for a 5 minute period, then your polar alignment is not good.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: Ron Kramer ronkramer1957@... [ap-gto]
To: ap-gto
Sent: Mon, Oct 30, 2017 8:39 pm
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Guiding a mach1 - and pec?



thanks I'll try this next clear night.
I did try to set DEC to 0 - as per your suggestion before but it wouldn't stick - it changed to 1  (is that ok?)
You say do this for both axis then. Will do.

I assumed that teh "start" of the pec curve would change if he contact with the worm changed place.
I'll figure that's wrong.

Will do. Don't give me to much at once. My memory is shot. I'll likely print the above out and get that step done.



On Mon, Oct 30, 2017 at 7:24 PM, chris1011@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...> wrote:
 

Frustrated , I wondered about PEC.  It was on, and I read it's "recorded" at the shop and to leave it be... it's set.  Well if I disengaged the worm gears (as I do this to balance with no drag) would not the pec be "off"?
No, disengaging the worm from the worm wheel does not change the PE corrections.

I think you are grasping at straws. Please read my other post about polar alignment - try to get it as good as possible so that the guiding program does not need to fight your misalignment drift.

PLEASE read the following and try it (for your sake and the rest of us who are trying to help):

If you have any doubts about the tracking accuracy do this: TURN OFF the guide corrections to the mount by turning the aggressiveness to zero. Your guider will still record the motion of the guide star and will show you the slow drift back and forth of the RA axis caused by PE AND the steady drift up or down of both RA and Dec due to polar misalignment. Once you have that data, take a screen shot and save it, or post it somewhere so we can all see what your basic mount is actually doing sans the complications of the guiding software corrections. THEN do it all again but this time turn on the PE corrections. You should see a marked improvement of the RA wiggles back and forth because the PEM will be correcting most of that and you should have only the steady drift due to polar misalignment. Both of these tests should take 10 minutes at most (one complete worm cycle).

Now you actually have something to work with instead of the performance below that is mixed up with corrections that may or may not be correct. The other advantage to the above test is that it can show you exactly what to do to precision align your mount on the pole. If you want, I can explain again how that is done, and believe it or not, it is really quite simple and straight forward. It is well worth doing drift alignment and need not be difficult at all and take very little time.

Rolando


-----Original Message-----
From: ronkramer1957@... [ap-gto] <ap-gto@...>
To: ap-gto <ap-gto@...>
Sent: Mon, Oct 30, 2017 6:09 pm
Subject: [ap-gto] Guiding a mach1 - and pec?



I've now had my 2nd night of stars since my Mach1 arrived. I wanted to concentrate on guiding (since that is why I upgraded from the NEQ6).

I carefully balanced the scope.  Calibrated (PHD2) near meridian/ecliptic.

guiding didn't look good at that location. I moved to another area and wasn't much better. 

Seeing I suspect was horrible. (I Could see a hazy icy ring out around the moon). Maybe that's why it was bad?   So I tried guide assistant in PHD2 (I don't think it uses seeing as it doesn't do actual guiding)? 

The results I think? were very good? 


Hoping my photo will appear above?

Though that seemed to report good things, guiding was very abrupt and lots of zig zags.  Like OVER correcting...  Though I ended up with Dec agression at  9.  (yea... 9).  Could that be normal? 

I was doing 4 second exposures as was recommended here.  HOWEVER I find it very difficult to do this or longer as my camera's gain is already turned down to 10 in order not to over saturate the guide star (and I still get saturation warnings at that).  Any other way to turn down sensitivity so allow 5 second exposures as recommended by Roland?   (ASI290MM)  ND filter added to camera? 

Frustrated , I wondered about PEC.  It was on, and I read it's "recorded" at the shop and to leave it be... it's set.  Well if I disengaged the worm gears (as I do this to balance with no drag) would not the pec be "off"?  Turning pec OFF - looked better...  I did then click RECORD and watched guiding which was a bit better without PEC.  Later I noticed it was engaged again. (once recorded does it then apply that recorded error?)  

I then was getting a lot of star lost errors (I think high thin clouds) as I was in a small gap in days of rain.  Advice?  Wait and try again? the GA feedback is good?   what about PEC.  I read somewhere on here about uploading it to the mount?  Id I recorded it - didn't it auto apply it?