Date   

Re: keypad connector pinout

Harley Davidson
 

Isn't that when things go wrong when you have clear skies. Maybe I need to break mine so the weather will clear :)

tony

----- Original Message -----
From: joedfisher
To: ap-gto@...
Sent: Monday, January 04, 2010 6:41 PM
Subject: [ap-gto] Re: keypad connector pinout
by the way- I have a new cable ordered, I am just trying to get by in the meantime. Trying to take advantage of these rare clear skies!


Re: keypad connector pinout

Howard Hedlund
 

Hi Joe,



The cable actually has six wires. The red and black wires are not used.




Pin 1 Yellow S2

Pin 2 Blue Grnd

Pin 3 unused

Pin 4 White +Pos.

Pin 5 Green S3



Stay warm!



Mag. 7 skies!



Howard Hedlund

Astro-Physics, Inc.

815-282-1513

________________________________

From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...] On Behalf
Of joedfisher
Sent: Monday, January 04, 2010 5:42 PM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: [ap-gto] Re: keypad connector pinout







--- In ap-gto@... <mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com> ,
"joedfisher" <joedfisher@...> wrote:

I have a keypad connector problem where a couple wires have become
disconnected inside the connector housing (the five pin connector which
connects to the mount controller.) I did not discover that the strain
relief on the connector had come lose and with the sub-zero temps here
in Minnesota things got a 'little' stiff and a couple of the wires
snapped off inside the connector.

There are four wires (red, blue, yellow, and white) and I need to know
which of these goes to what connector pins.

This is for a 900GTO3 mount and the serial number on the keypad is
1896GTO.

Thanks for any help you can provide.
by the way- I have a new cable ordered, I am just trying to get by in
the meantime. Trying to take advantage of these rare clear skies!


Re: keypad connector pinout

joedfisher <joedfisher@...>
 

--- In ap-gto@..., "joedfisher" <joedfisher@...> wrote:

I have a keypad connector problem where a couple wires have become disconnected inside the connector housing (the five pin connector which connects to the mount controller.) I did not discover that the strain relief on the connector had come lose and with the sub-zero temps here in Minnesota things got a 'little' stiff and a couple of the wires snapped off inside the connector.

There are four wires (red, blue, yellow, and white) and I need to know which of these goes to what connector pins.

This is for a 900GTO3 mount and the serial number on the keypad is 1896GTO.

Thanks for any help you can provide.
by the way- I have a new cable ordered, I am just trying to get by in the meantime. Trying to take advantage of these rare clear skies!


keypad connector pinout

joedfisher <joedfisher@...>
 

I have a keypad connector problem where a couple wires have become disconnected inside the connector housing (the five pin connector which connects to the mount controller.) I did not discover that the strain relief on the connector had come lose and with the sub-zero temps here in Minnesota things got a 'little' stiff and a couple of the wires snapped off inside the connector.

There are four wires (red, blue, yellow, and white) and I need to know which of these goes to what connector pins.

This is for a 900GTO3 mount and the serial number on the keypad is 1896GTO.

Thanks for any help you can provide.


Re: New mount

Yves Laroche
 

Hi Doris,



The snow is our biggest problem here in Quebec. If someone can clear off
all the snow from the observatory after a snowstorm, before the snow can
melt down (is case of raising temperature) and change to ice just after (in
case of a sudden dropping temperature) so it could be possible for you to
operate without problem else watch out. Some melting snow may change to ice
over time and this can cause really bad behaviours. A friend of mine
already got this kind of problem. He wasn’t able to open his dome shutter
manually because of snow infiltration that was iced on the rails. Motors
could be burned because of this. Just remember that we have to clear the
snow from our roofs to be sure that it will prevent some water infiltration
in the house.



Regards,

Yves







_____

De : ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...] De la part de DO
Envoyé : 4 janvier 2010 13:38
À : ap-gto@...
Objet : [ap-gto] Re: New mount





Ron thanks for the thourough answer.

From your answer I understand the an AP 900 if fine.

I have been operating a remote observatory for the last five years, but only
at 100 yards from the control room.
I realize I am going for a quite different ball game now.
I really enjoy having details from people who went through all imaginable
problems. Better be warned before...

I have friends that operate a telescope remotely from Arizona. I hope to
learn from the experience. However in my case the observatory will be
located in a place where heavy snow dumps are quite common in the Winter. I
will have to factor that in too, as well as freezing rain...

But like I said the site is home to 4 other observatories already and is
constantly monitored.
I give myself about 4 years to complete it satisfactorily. If I need more
time so be it. Astronomy is all about patience..

cheers,

DO

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups. <mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com> com, Wodaski -
Yahoo <yahoo@...> wrote:

There isn't any hardware that will fit that specification. <g> Even the
Hubble has problems, and I'm pretty sure they had a larger budget than any
of us do...

We operate a dozen remote telescopes at the Tzec Maun Foundation, some in
New Mexico, some in Australia. Unexpected things happen. Sometimes you get a
long period where everything is fine; sometimes things go wrong all at once.
So:

* For any reasonable remote setup, the single largest factor in how well
things will work is the skill of the operator in setting it up and
maintaining it. It takes a while to learn all the lessons you'll need to
learn, but it's reasonable to expect to get things to the point where you
only need to visit, on average, ever few months.

* There will be emergencies, and response time is critical in determining
how much damage does or does not occur. You can add safety features, but
safety features also fail occasionally. <g> You really, really want to have
someone near the telescope available to assist you in an emergency. that
might be throwing a tarp over stuff when the roof won't close, dealing with
the consequences of a lightning strike, etc.

* Remote operation is deceptive. Several times I've seen remote users not
quite realize what's really happening with the hardware. For example, if the
roof isn't moving, simply clicking on the 'move roof' button in the software
may be a tragically bad idea. Maybe the roof really is moving, and now it's
going to be on the ground from moving too much (a sensor might be dead or
just wrong). But more subtle gotchas exist, like misreading the weather, or
just getting unlucky with the weather.

It's best to plan for this stuff, and to be able to drop everything,
probably once a year or so, to get to the observatory to do what needs to be
done (or pay to have it done for you).

We use several AP mounts for our remote telescopes. There is nothing
inherent in the mounts that will get in your way. But you will have to pay
attention to details like how you route cables (they had better not snag in
a remote setup!), making sure there's no risk of the clutches slipping, and
so on. But you have to do such things with any mount, they just vary from
one mount design to another, and with the quality of the mount's design and
construction.

So allow for a learning curve, and expect to make more visits to the
remote observatory in the first year of service as you learn how to tune it
for remote operation. Mounts, cameras, weather instruments, sensors, limit
switches - everything has failure modes. You'll need to learn what they are
for your specific situation, and deal with that. (For example, on one
observatory, the speed of movement of the dome shutters was high enough that
it could occasionally override the limit switch. It took me a long time to
figure out what kind of limit switch I could use to deal with that.)

Ron Wodaski

On Jan 4, 2010, at 10:01 AM, DO wrote:

Hi all! And a happy new year!

I am planning my budget for a new observatory. I am planning to install
a TOA 150 with my STL11 in it. The observatory will by far from my main
residence and will be operated completely remotely from a distance of 400
miles (600 km).

I will need a mount that can avoid me any problem in the future as
fixing any glitch will be difficult. The observation site is monitored all
the time but I want to call outside help only in case of emergency.

As far as the payload is concerned, an AP 900 should be sufficient. What
I am woundering is if an AP900 can be operated from such a distance and be
completely trouble free for extended periods. The other option would be to
go for a Paramount. However the $$$ involved would force me to cut budgets
from other items.

DO



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Re: New mount

DO <doris.thibeault@...>
 

Ron thanks for the thourough answer.

From your answer I understand the an AP 900 if fine.

I have been operating a remote observatory for the last five years, but only at 100 yards from the control room.
I realize I am going for a quite different ball game now.
I really enjoy having details from people who went through all imaginable problems. Better be warned before...

I have friends that operate a telescope remotely from Arizona. I hope to learn from the experience. However in my case the observatory will be located in a place where heavy snow dumps are quite common in the Winter. I will have to factor that in too, as well as freezing rain...

But like I said the site is home to 4 other observatories already and is constantly monitored.
I give myself about 4 years to complete it satisfactorily. If I need more time so be it. Astronomy is all about patience..

cheers,

DO

--- In ap-gto@..., Wodaski - Yahoo <yahoo@...> wrote:

There isn't any hardware that will fit that specification. <g> Even the Hubble has problems, and I'm pretty sure they had a larger budget than any of us do...

We operate a dozen remote telescopes at the Tzec Maun Foundation, some in New Mexico, some in Australia. Unexpected things happen. Sometimes you get a long period where everything is fine; sometimes things go wrong all at once. So:

* For any reasonable remote setup, the single largest factor in how well things will work is the skill of the operator in setting it up and maintaining it. It takes a while to learn all the lessons you'll need to learn, but it's reasonable to expect to get things to the point where you only need to visit, on average, ever few months.

* There will be emergencies, and response time is critical in determining how much damage does or does not occur. You can add safety features, but safety features also fail occasionally. <g> You really, really want to have someone near the telescope available to assist you in an emergency. that might be throwing a tarp over stuff when the roof won't close, dealing with the consequences of a lightning strike, etc.

* Remote operation is deceptive. Several times I've seen remote users not quite realize what's really happening with the hardware. For example, if the roof isn't moving, simply clicking on the 'move roof' button in the software may be a tragically bad idea. Maybe the roof really is moving, and now it's going to be on the ground from moving too much (a sensor might be dead or just wrong). But more subtle gotchas exist, like misreading the weather, or just getting unlucky with the weather.

It's best to plan for this stuff, and to be able to drop everything, probably once a year or so, to get to the observatory to do what needs to be done (or pay to have it done for you).

We use several AP mounts for our remote telescopes. There is nothing inherent in the mounts that will get in your way. But you will have to pay attention to details like how you route cables (they had better not snag in a remote setup!), making sure there's no risk of the clutches slipping, and so on. But you have to do such things with any mount, they just vary from one mount design to another, and with the quality of the mount's design and construction.

So allow for a learning curve, and expect to make more visits to the remote observatory in the first year of service as you learn how to tune it for remote operation. Mounts, cameras, weather instruments, sensors, limit switches - everything has failure modes. You'll need to learn what they are for your specific situation, and deal with that. (For example, on one observatory, the speed of movement of the dome shutters was high enough that it could occasionally override the limit switch. It took me a long time to figure out what kind of limit switch I could use to deal with that.)

Ron Wodaski

On Jan 4, 2010, at 10:01 AM, DO wrote:

Hi all! And a happy new year!

I am planning my budget for a new observatory. I am planning to install a TOA 150 with my STL11 in it. The observatory will by far from my main residence and will be operated completely remotely from a distance of 400 miles (600 km).

I will need a mount that can avoid me any problem in the future as fixing any glitch will be difficult. The observation site is monitored all the time but I want to call outside help only in case of emergency.

As far as the payload is concerned, an AP 900 should be sufficient. What I am woundering is if an AP900 can be operated from such a distance and be completely trouble free for extended periods. The other option would be to go for a Paramount. However the $$$ involved would force me to cut budgets from other items.

DO



------------------------------------

To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list
see http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links



Re: New mount

Wodaski - Yahoo <yahoo@...>
 

There isn't any hardware that will fit that specification. <g> Even the Hubble has problems, and I'm pretty sure they had a larger budget than any of us do...

We operate a dozen remote telescopes at the Tzec Maun Foundation, some in New Mexico, some in Australia. Unexpected things happen. Sometimes you get a long period where everything is fine; sometimes things go wrong all at once. So:

* For any reasonable remote setup, the single largest factor in how well things will work is the skill of the operator in setting it up and maintaining it. It takes a while to learn all the lessons you'll need to learn, but it's reasonable to expect to get things to the point where you only need to visit, on average, ever few months.

* There will be emergencies, and response time is critical in determining how much damage does or does not occur. You can add safety features, but safety features also fail occasionally. <g> You really, really want to have someone near the telescope available to assist you in an emergency. that might be throwing a tarp over stuff when the roof won't close, dealing with the consequences of a lightning strike, etc.

* Remote operation is deceptive. Several times I've seen remote users not quite realize what's really happening with the hardware. For example, if the roof isn't moving, simply clicking on the 'move roof' button in the software may be a tragically bad idea. Maybe the roof really is moving, and now it's going to be on the ground from moving too much (a sensor might be dead or just wrong). But more subtle gotchas exist, like misreading the weather, or just getting unlucky with the weather.

It's best to plan for this stuff, and to be able to drop everything, probably once a year or so, to get to the observatory to do what needs to be done (or pay to have it done for you).

We use several AP mounts for our remote telescopes. There is nothing inherent in the mounts that will get in your way. But you will have to pay attention to details like how you route cables (they had better not snag in a remote setup!), making sure there's no risk of the clutches slipping, and so on. But you have to do such things with any mount, they just vary from one mount design to another, and with the quality of the mount's design and construction.

So allow for a learning curve, and expect to make more visits to the remote observatory in the first year of service as you learn how to tune it for remote operation. Mounts, cameras, weather instruments, sensors, limit switches - everything has failure modes. You'll need to learn what they are for your specific situation, and deal with that. (For example, on one observatory, the speed of movement of the dome shutters was high enough that it could occasionally override the limit switch. It took me a long time to figure out what kind of limit switch I could use to deal with that.)

Ron Wodaski

On Jan 4, 2010, at 10:01 AM, DO wrote:

Hi all! And a happy new year!

I am planning my budget for a new observatory. I am planning to install a TOA 150 with my STL11 in it. The observatory will by far from my main residence and will be operated completely remotely from a distance of 400 miles (600 km).

I will need a mount that can avoid me any problem in the future as fixing any glitch will be difficult. The observation site is monitored all the time but I want to call outside help only in case of emergency.

As far as the payload is concerned, an AP 900 should be sufficient. What I am woundering is if an AP900 can be operated from such a distance and be completely trouble free for extended periods. The other option would be to go for a Paramount. However the $$$ involved would force me to cut budgets from other items.

DO



------------------------------------

To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list
see http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links



New mount

DO <doris.thibeault@...>
 

Hi all! And a happy new year!

I am planning my budget for a new observatory. I am planning to install a TOA 150 with my STL11 in it. The observatory will by far from my main residence and will be operated completely remotely from a distance of 400 miles (600 km).

I will need a mount that can avoid me any problem in the future as fixing any glitch will be difficult. The observation site is monitored all the time but I want to call outside help only in case of emergency.

As far as the payload is concerned, an AP 900 should be sufficient. What I am woundering is if an AP900 can be operated from such a distance and be completely trouble free for extended periods. The other option would be to go for a Paramount. However the $$$ involved would force me to cut budgets from other items.

DO


Re: Question for Ray

coyote+rim+ranch <coyyote@...>
 

For the past year I have been running my observatory with a Mac mini and VMFusionware. I much prefer the reliability of the mac hardware to my previous PCs. Jack Harvey

--- In ap-gto@..., "Jeffrey A. Steinberg" <jeffreys48.groups@...> wrote:

Ray, I have been tempted to go mac while imaging. I there are several
telescope control programs out there but I don't believe they use the
Ascom platform. Can you confirm this? And if they do use Ascom is a
Mac compatible version needed? If it's a standard, I think no but I
am only into this for a few months.

For now I am sticking with a PC.

-----------------
Jeffrey Steinberg

On Jan 2, 2010, at 12:13 PM, "Ray Gralak &#92;(Yahoo Groups&#92;)" <yahoo@...
> wrote:

Hi Sam,

OK, great! Thanks for letting me know that fixed the problem!

-Ray

-----Original Message-----
From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...] On
Behalf Of Samuel Bruce
Sent: Saturday, January 02, 2010 8:46 AM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: [ap-gto] Re:ASCOM driver v4.99.49



Ray... Tried it out last night with great success over .48. No
more issues
with communication and or errors! Thank you so much for your hard
work.

Sam Bruce

Mach1GTO






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Question for Ray

Jeffrey A. Steinberg
 

Firmware for the mount or for a box that plugs into the mount? I
understand if you can't answer this.

-----------------
Jeffrey Steinberg
914-374-7503

On Jan 2, 2010, at 6:45 PM, "Ray Gralak &#92;(Yahoo Groups&#92;)" <yahoo@...
> wrote:

Thanks again for a quick response, Ray. How many hours out of 24
(less sleep time) are you at your computer. I think the number is
high!

Thanks for all your work on the driver and the control center (can't
wait). Any newer update on this?
Jeffrey, APCC has just started beta testing with a couple customers,
but that group will be expanded after most of the little issues have
been resolved. There also may be one more firmware feature or two
that will be added. Most of my focus has been on the ASCOM driver
lately but I'm hoping to shift most of my effort to APCC from now on.

-Ray


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Question for Ray

Ray Gralak &#92;(Yahoo Groups&#92;) <yahoo@...>
 

Thanks again for a quick response, Ray. How many hours out of 24
(less sleep time) are you at your computer. I think the number is high!

Thanks for all your work on the driver and the control center (can't
wait). Any newer update on this?
Jeffrey, APCC has just started beta testing with a couple customers, but that group will be expanded after most of the little issues have been resolved. There also may be one more firmware feature or two that will be added. Most of my focus has been on the ASCOM driver lately but I'm hoping to shift most of my effort to APCC from now on.

-Ray


Re: Question for Ray

Jeffrey A. Steinberg
 

Thanks again for a quick response, Ray. How many hours out of 24
(less sleep time) are you at your computer. I think the number is high!

Thanks for all your work on the driver and the control center (can't
wait). Any newer update on this?

-----------------
Jeffrey Steinberg
914-374-7503

On Jan 2, 2010, at 6:09 PM, "Ray Gralak &#92;(Yahoo Groups&#92;)" <yahoo@...
> wrote:

Jeffrey,

ASCOM only runs on windows so it won't run on a Mac. That said many
people just run Windows on a Mac with VMWare Fusion. I hear that
works great but you would have to stick with Windows-based control
programs.

-Ray

Ray, I have been tempted to go mac while imaging. I there are
several
telescope control programs out there but I don't believe they use
the
Ascom platform. Can you confirm this? And if they do use Ascom is a
Mac compatible version needed? If it's a standard, I think no but I
am only into this for a few months.

For now I am sticking with a PC.

-----------------
Jeffrey Steinberg

On Jan 2, 2010, at 12:13 PM, "Ray Gralak &#92;(Yahoo Groups&#92;)" <yahoo@...
<mailto:yahoo%40gralak.com>
wrote:
Hi Sam,

OK, great! Thanks for letting me know that fixed the problem!

-Ray

-----Original Message-----
From: ap-gto@... <mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:ap-gto@... <mailto:ap-
gto%40yahoogroups.com> ] On
Behalf Of Samuel Bruce
Sent: Saturday, January 02, 2010 8:46 AM
To: ap-gto@... <mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [ap-gto] Re:ASCOM driver v4.99.49



Ray... Tried it out last night with great success over .48. No
more issues
with communication and or errors! Thank you so much for your
hard
work.

Sam Bruce

Mach1GTO





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Question for Ray

Ray Gralak &#92;(Yahoo Groups&#92;) <yahoo@...>
 

Jeffrey,

ASCOM only runs on windows so it won't run on a Mac. That said many people just run Windows on a Mac with VMWare Fusion. I hear that works great but you would have to stick with Windows-based control programs.

-Ray

Ray, I have been tempted to go mac while imaging. I there are several
telescope control programs out there but I don't believe they use the
Ascom platform. Can you confirm this? And if they do use Ascom is a
Mac compatible version needed? If it's a standard, I think no but I
am only into this for a few months.

For now I am sticking with a PC.

-----------------
Jeffrey Steinberg

On Jan 2, 2010, at 12:13 PM, "Ray Gralak &#92;(Yahoo Groups&#92;)" <yahoo@... <mailto:yahoo%40gralak.com>
wrote:
Hi Sam,

OK, great! Thanks for letting me know that fixed the problem!

-Ray

-----Original Message-----
From: ap-gto@... <mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:ap-gto@... <mailto:ap-
gto%40yahoogroups.com> ] On
Behalf Of Samuel Bruce
Sent: Saturday, January 02, 2010 8:46 AM
To: ap-gto@... <mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [ap-gto] Re:ASCOM driver v4.99.49



Ray... Tried it out last night with great success over .48. No
more issues
with communication and or errors! Thank you so much for your hard
work.

Sam Bruce

Mach1GTO

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




Question for Ray

Jeffrey A. Steinberg
 

Ray, I have been tempted to go mac while imaging. I there are several
telescope control programs out there but I don't believe they use the
Ascom platform. Can you confirm this? And if they do use Ascom is a
Mac compatible version needed? If it's a standard, I think no but I
am only into this for a few months.

For now I am sticking with a PC.

-----------------
Jeffrey Steinberg

On Jan 2, 2010, at 12:13 PM, "Ray Gralak &#92;(Yahoo Groups&#92;)" <yahoo@...
> wrote:

Hi Sam,

OK, great! Thanks for letting me know that fixed the problem!

-Ray

-----Original Message-----
From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...] On
Behalf Of Samuel Bruce
Sent: Saturday, January 02, 2010 8:46 AM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: [ap-gto] Re:ASCOM driver v4.99.49



Ray... Tried it out last night with great success over .48. No
more issues
with communication and or errors! Thank you so much for your hard
work.

Sam Bruce

Mach1GTO

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: New Computers?

dannysperry
 

Hi Allen,

Will your new laptop have Vista 32-bit, Vista 64-bit, Win 7 32-bit, or Win 7 64-bit? With the 32-bit varieties you won't have much trouble, if any. The 64-bit versions present some problems but I haven't encountered any real serious compatibility issues yet.

TheSky6, CCDSoft v5, MaxImDL v5, and ImagesPlus v3.75+ all work fine with Vista and Win 7 64-bit. For CCDSoft, you'll need to make sure you get the 64-bit driver checker. But with your parallel camera, that could present a different issue all together. The Quatech SPP-100 works great under Win XP but I don't know if there are 64-bit drivers AND most new laptops don't come with PCMCIA ports anymore. That one will take a bit more research. You might want to see if SBIG has any recommendations.

The serial-to-USB situation is no problem (for the mount, focusers, etc.). Get some adapters from FTDI. They work great with the 64-bit OSes and they maintain their serial port assignments when you plug them into a different USB port. You can plug a few into a USB hub then just have 1 cable going to the laptop.

Hope that helps.

Best,
Danny

--- In ap-gto@..., "gilchriswa" <gilchris@...> wrote:

I'm almost certain this question has been asked before, and I hate to bother the group with this, but I could not find the right messages with a brief search. I will need to replace my old laptop computer soon, and none of the new ones has a serial or parallel port. They also run Vista instead of the old XP-Pro I've been using. I assume that there are port expanders or such that plug into a USB port and provide an RS-232 serial port for connecting to my AP-1200 mount. Does anyone have any experience or recommendations relating to these devices? Do any of them have parallel ports? I still use an old parallel port ST-7 as an autoguider. Is Windows Vista compatible with The Sky-6 and CCDSoft software I am currently using, or will I need to get an update on those programs? Thanks for any help that anyone can provide.

Allen Gilchrist


Re: ASCOM driver v4.99.49

Ray Gralak &#92;(Yahoo Groups&#92;) <yahoo@...>
 

Hi Sam,

OK, great! Thanks for letting me know that fixed the problem!

-Ray

-----Original Message-----
From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...] On Behalf Of Samuel Bruce
Sent: Saturday, January 02, 2010 8:46 AM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: [ap-gto] Re:ASCOM driver v4.99.49



Ray... Tried it out last night with great success over .48. No more issues
with communication and or errors! Thank you so much for your hard work.

Sam Bruce

Mach1GTO






Re: ASCOM driver v4.99.49

Samuel Bruce <sgbruce@...>
 

Ray... Tried it out last night with great success over .48. No more issues
with communication and or errors! Thank you so much for your hard work.



Sam Bruce

Mach1GTO


Re: Grazing the Umbra (PLE 2009)

Anthony Ayiomamitis <anthony@...>
 

O/H Antonio Fernandez :
Very nice sequence of images, Anthony!!
Thanks Antonio. Let's hope for good weather in less than two weeks' time for the next eclipse. :-)

Anthony.
Antonio
http://afesan.es

--------------------------------------------------
From: "Anthony Ayiomamitis" <anthony@...>
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2009 11:50 PM
To: <ap-ug@...>; <ap-gto@...>
Subject: [ap-gto] Grazing the Umbra (PLE 2009)


Dear group,

We were very fortunate to have relatively very good conditions for this
evening's partial lunar eclipse and which was a great way to end the
year, the decade as well as IYA 2009.

Although the depth was only 8%, the moon's partial entry into the umbral
shadow was quite obvious both naked eye as well as through the telescope
at high power. For a time series with exposures spaced 30 minutes apart
and which documents the moon's entry into the penumbra and umbra as well
as its consequent exit, please see
http://www.perseus.gr/Astro-Eclipses-2009-12-31b.htm .

Best wishes to everyone for the New Year filled with health and prosperity!

Anthony.


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Re: Grazing the Umbra (PLE 2009)

Antonio Fernandez <afesan@...>
 

Very nice sequence of images, Anthony!!

Antonio
http://afesan.es

--------------------------------------------------
From: "Anthony Ayiomamitis" <anthony@...>
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2009 11:50 PM
To: <ap-ug@...>; <ap-gto@...>
Subject: [ap-gto] Grazing the Umbra (PLE 2009)

Dear group,

We were very fortunate to have relatively very good conditions for this
evening's partial lunar eclipse and which was a great way to end the
year, the decade as well as IYA 2009.

Although the depth was only 8%, the moon's partial entry into the umbral
shadow was quite obvious both naked eye as well as through the telescope
at high power. For a time series with exposures spaced 30 minutes apart
and which documents the moon's entry into the penumbra and umbra as well
as its consequent exit, please see
http://www.perseus.gr/Astro-Eclipses-2009-12-31b.htm .

Best wishes to everyone for the New Year filled with health and prosperity!

Anthony.


------------------------------------

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see http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links




Re: Grazing the Umbra (PLE 2009)

sebkersten
 

Hello

Congratulation for this beautifull report of this eclipse.

Happy new Year

Sébastien Kersten
http://www.astropixel.org

Anthony Ayiomamitis a écrit :

Dear group,

We were very fortunate to have relatively very good conditions for this evening's partial lunar eclipse and which was a great way to end the year, the decade as well as IYA 2009.

Although the depth was only 8%, the moon's partial entry into the umbral shadow was quite obvious both naked eye as well as through the telescope at high power. For a time series with exposures spaced 30 minutes apart and which documents the moon's entry into the penumbra and umbra as well as its consequent exit, please see http://www.perseus.gr/Astro-Eclipses-2009-12-31b.htm .

Best wishes to everyone for the New Year filled with health and prosperity!

Anthony.


------------------------------------

To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list
see http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links