Date   

Re: Controlling 900GTO Mount without a Serial Port

r1300rs
 

I was wondering if anyone had experience with the wireless 4-port USB hubs. I have found
that many USB-Serial adapters work fine (I use, L-com, Cables-to-go, and Keyspan).

I also use a 4 port USB hub to Ethernet so I can run one cable from the mount to inside the
house. I can connect the mount, Robo, SBIG and Web cam to the hub and run one 150' Cat
6e to the house.

I would like to lose the cable and try wireless.......Thanks!


Re: Controlling 900GTO Mount without a Serial Port

Bert Katzung
 

Hi Wade:
I'm amazed this wasn't answered immediately --- the question comes up so often. THe answerr is definitely yes, but pick a "known-to-work" brand of hub. I don't know about dongle adapters but I have an Edgeport USB to serial hub and it works perfectly.
Bert

katzung1@comcast.net
www.astronomy-images.com
www.visionlightgallery.com/katzung/

----- Original Message -----
From: "twade35" <twade35@yahoo.com>
To: <ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, July 15, 2007 3:04 PM
Subject: [ap-gto] Controlling 900GTO Mount without a Serial Port


I recently purchased a laptop which unfortunately has no serial ports.
Is it possible to use a USB to Serial Port cable with a 900GTO mount?
If so, will The Sky 6 and other software packages recognize the mount
through a USB connection? Any help or suggestions would be greatly
appreciated.

Thanks,

Wade



To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list
see http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gto
Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: Controlling 900GTO Mount without a Serial Port

twade35
 

To all,

After submitting the post, I found the thread pertaining to the Keyspan
USB to Serial adapter. I just ordered one. My initial search before
posting the above message must have been to general so it did not bring
up anything related to Keyspan.

Wade


Controlling 900GTO Mount without a Serial Port

twade35
 

I recently purchased a laptop which unfortunately has no serial ports.
Is it possible to use a USB to Serial Port cable with a 900GTO mount?
If so, will The Sky 6 and other software packages recognize the mount
through a USB connection? Any help or suggestions would be greatly
appreciated.

Thanks,

Wade


Re: C/2006 C/2006 MZ13 Complete with Ion Tail

Stuart Heggie <stuart.j.heggie@...>
 

Nicely done Dennis! I have yet to see it (raining right now for instance).

Stuart

----- Original Message -----
From: Dennis Persyk
To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2007 6:02 PM
Subject: [ap-gto] C/2006 C/2006 MZ13 Complete with Ion Tail


C/2006 VZ13 is about at its peak on the light curve. This is
presently the brightest comet in the sky. It is fading now.

It is racing though Draco at 9.3 arc seconds per minute at
magnitude ~ 8.4. I was limited to 60 second exposures when I
imaged it to avoid blur.

The comet has an ion tail that I had difficulty bringing out in my
processing. It is just barely apparent in my stack of 40 x 60s.
However, I was able to bring out what appears to be a 15 arc minute
tail using the Larson-Sekanina filter in AstroArt 3.0. I realize
this is a somewhat "dangerous" filter since one can easily introduce
no end of interesting artifacts. I would thus appreciate feedback
from the comet cognoscenti (and everyone else) on whether my
processing is legitimate.

Images, associated data, imaging notes and all at
http://home.att.net/~dpersyk/new.htm

Please take a look and give me some feedback. Thank you for
visiting my site.

Clear skies,

Dennis Persyk
Igloo Observatory Home Page http://dpersyk.home.att.net
Hampshire, IL

Pier Design Paper: http://home.att.net/~dpersyk/Pier_Design.htm


Re: Anyone designed a limit switch or similar to prvent pier col...

Mark Squicquero
 

Joe,

Interesting analysis of the 3D nature of the problem. I hadn't
thought of it in those terms. I keep thinking of my 1200 GTO as a
telescope mount when it fact it is a servo controlled robot that is
carrying a couple of scopes, with all the inherent implications and
capabilities. Hmmmm, if we can just get it to transform into .....

Mark



--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Joseph Zeglinski" <J.Zeglinski@...>
wrote:

Mark,

I was thinking of scenarios where you could put the OTA into an
unintended
collision, "while" in the process of backing up.

Lets say the scope had no DEC motion, and the scope was
approaching the
pier, at tracking rate. If you followed you original thinking, and
reversed
both motors, then the OTA might have been fine, except that it is
now
mispositioned during a reverse, where it might now hit the OTA,
from a
different direction. Now the OTA does strike the pier, because of
the DEC
adjustment. Or, if it did hit, during this second unnecessary
swing, the
circuit now reverses the reversal.

Of course, I may have misinterpreted your original intention,
of collision
avoidance during tracking, ONLY, and inaccurately extended the
discussion to
dual motor reversal. At the very least, even quickly stopping all
motion, with
the pier switch approach, will be a large success. Besides, if the
OTA were to
hit the pier during slew, I suspect the momentum would be too great
to avoid a
minor dent, with the circuit. I'm not sure how quickly it could be
emergency
stopped, during a fast slew.

The really bad news is that a pier based pneumatic switch
doesn't cover
all possibilities. When I took my new AP900 for it's first ride in
the rec
room, I let carefully slewed the scope to see how far it would go
before it
hit RA limits. Well, since it was also tracking when I approached
the far RA
extent, the OTA got a scratch when it touched the AP's Pier Adapter
azimuth
adjust knob - no matter how carefully meticulous I was trying to
be. In this
case, the OTA was nowhere near the tripod (pier), but it still
would have
gotten a dent, rather than just a minor scratch, from the "pier
adapter", on
top of the tripod. If the tracking mount strikes the mount parts
itself - gear
box motor housing, or base fork parts, the protection we have been
discussing
will fail - not even a loosely engaged clutch will prevent some
damage from
occurring.

... Then again ... wouldn't it be nice ...

It would be nice to have a software application where you
could "train it"
to identify the free space of OTA operation - train it the way they
train a
robotic arm to work on an assembly line. I believe the trainer
swings the arm
around (manually) in all "task" directions to map out the free
zone. An
example would be the paint sprayer robot on an automotive assembly
line - a
human programmer "shows" the robot where to spray, by literally
taking it by
the hand during it's training session. Then a collision avoidance
profile, or
map, is vectorized and extrapolated from the manually tested
positions. In
operation, after human training, as other applications command the
robot to
slew to a target position, the servo driver software constantly
checks that
the encoders are showing the robot is still within the "safe
envelope", mapped
for the job. This is a 3-D profile, just as would be required for
the
telescope mount. In this case, the ASCOM driver used by the
application (The
Sky, etc.), would make sure that the OTA is within it's trained 3D
envelope.
This would be done for each OTA used on the mount, with perhaps
a "safe band"
added, to allow your repositioning of the OTA to balance
accessories at some
later date, after training.

The good news is that something basically similar already done
in 2D - the
CP3 program allows you to define a "horizon limit" below which the
scope will
not GOTO. Now, second stage, create a piece of software to gather
AZ-ALT
coordinates as you slew the scope (during daylight) up and down
over tree
tops, buildings, and other obstructions on your 360 degree horizon,
and
"vectorize that path". This CP3 extension profile is still 2D, but
at least it
enhances the DEC positioning, to avoid "the trees", instead of
just "the
straight treeline".

Finally, to extend this to 3D (pier/mount avoidance), you would
swing the
OTA vertically (+/- 90 degrees), in Dec, at some increment of Hour
Angle,
indicating to the training program, how far the OTA will be allowed
to slew,
at that specific HA step position. You now have a series of safe
limit
coordinates (two Elevation limits at each HA), which can be joined
into a 3D
safe envelope, for future use. This envelope not only defines the
2D curve of
your visible horizon, it also defines the third level - of safe
limits of OTA
positioning. If you travel to a different site, the horizon curve
limiting
position can be reset to the old "treeline" method, as is done now
in CP3, but
the third level - collision avoidance curve will still be correct,
as long as
you are polar aligned - the same as when it was trained in daylight
back home.
Otherwise, if you go to a somewhat different site, at a
significantly
different latitude, the third level curve could be rotated by the
delta in
geographic latitude, and would still be sufficient to prevent the
OTA from
striking the mount or tripod.

Just a thought ...

Good luck with the basic system.

Joe


Re: Anyone designed a limit switch or similar to prvent pier col...

Joe Zeglinski
 

Mark,

I was thinking of scenarios where you could put the OTA into an unintended
collision, "while" in the process of backing up.

Lets say the scope had no DEC motion, and the scope was approaching the
pier, at tracking rate. If you followed you original thinking, and reversed
both motors, then the OTA might have been fine, except that it is now
mispositioned during a reverse, where it might now hit the OTA, from a
different direction. Now the OTA does strike the pier, because of the DEC
adjustment. Or, if it did hit, during this second unnecessary swing, the
circuit now reverses the reversal.

Of course, I may have misinterpreted your original intention, of collision
avoidance during tracking, ONLY, and inaccurately extended the discussion to
dual motor reversal. At the very least, even quickly stopping all motion, with
the pier switch approach, will be a large success. Besides, if the OTA were to
hit the pier during slew, I suspect the momentum would be too great to avoid a
minor dent, with the circuit. I'm not sure how quickly it could be emergency
stopped, during a fast slew.

The really bad news is that a pier based pneumatic switch doesn't cover
all possibilities. When I took my new AP900 for it's first ride in the rec
room, I let carefully slewed the scope to see how far it would go before it
hit RA limits. Well, since it was also tracking when I approached the far RA
extent, the OTA got a scratch when it touched the AP's Pier Adapter azimuth
adjust knob - no matter how carefully meticulous I was trying to be. In this
case, the OTA was nowhere near the tripod (pier), but it still would have
gotten a dent, rather than just a minor scratch, from the "pier adapter", on
top of the tripod. If the tracking mount strikes the mount parts itself - gear
box motor housing, or base fork parts, the protection we have been discussing
will fail - not even a loosely engaged clutch will prevent some damage from
occurring.

... Then again ... wouldn't it be nice ...

It would be nice to have a software application where you could "train it"
to identify the free space of OTA operation - train it the way they train a
robotic arm to work on an assembly line. I believe the trainer swings the arm
around (manually) in all "task" directions to map out the free zone. An
example would be the paint sprayer robot on an automotive assembly line - a
human programmer "shows" the robot where to spray, by literally taking it by
the hand during it's training session. Then a collision avoidance profile, or
map, is vectorized and extrapolated from the manually tested positions. In
operation, after human training, as other applications command the robot to
slew to a target position, the servo driver software constantly checks that
the encoders are showing the robot is still within the "safe envelope", mapped
for the job. This is a 3-D profile, just as would be required for the
telescope mount. In this case, the ASCOM driver used by the application (The
Sky, etc.), would make sure that the OTA is within it's trained 3D envelope.
This would be done for each OTA used on the mount, with perhaps a "safe band"
added, to allow your repositioning of the OTA to balance accessories at some
later date, after training.

The good news is that something basically similar already done in 2D - the
CP3 program allows you to define a "horizon limit" below which the scope will
not GOTO. Now, second stage, create a piece of software to gather AZ-ALT
coordinates as you slew the scope (during daylight) up and down over tree
tops, buildings, and other obstructions on your 360 degree horizon, and
"vectorize that path". This CP3 extension profile is still 2D, but at least it
enhances the DEC positioning, to avoid "the trees", instead of just "the
straight treeline".

Finally, to extend this to 3D (pier/mount avoidance), you would swing the
OTA vertically (+/- 90 degrees), in Dec, at some increment of Hour Angle,
indicating to the training program, how far the OTA will be allowed to slew,
at that specific HA step position. You now have a series of safe limit
coordinates (two Elevation limits at each HA), which can be joined into a 3D
safe envelope, for future use. This envelope not only defines the 2D curve of
your visible horizon, it also defines the third level - of safe limits of OTA
positioning. If you travel to a different site, the horizon curve limiting
position can be reset to the old "treeline" method, as is done now in CP3, but
the third level - collision avoidance curve will still be correct, as long as
you are polar aligned - the same as when it was trained in daylight back home.
Otherwise, if you go to a somewhat different site, at a significantly
different latitude, the third level curve could be rotated by the delta in
geographic latitude, and would still be sufficient to prevent the OTA from
striking the mount or tripod.

Just a thought ...

Good luck with the basic system.

Joe


C/2006 C/2006 MZ13 Complete with Ion Tail

Dennis Persyk <dpersyk@...>
 

C/2006 VZ13 is about at its peak on the light curve. This is
presently the brightest comet in the sky. It is fading now.

It is racing though Draco at 9.3 arc seconds per minute at
magnitude ~ 8.4. I was limited to 60 second exposures when I
imaged it to avoid blur.

The comet has an ion tail that I had difficulty bringing out in my
processing. It is just barely apparent in my stack of 40 x 60s.
However, I was able to bring out what appears to be a 15 arc minute
tail using the Larson-Sekanina filter in AstroArt 3.0. I realize
this is a somewhat "dangerous" filter since one can easily introduce
no end of interesting artifacts. I would thus appreciate feedback
from the comet cognoscenti (and everyone else) on whether my
processing is legitimate.

Images, associated data, imaging notes and all at
http://home.att.net/~dpersyk/new.htm

Please take a look and give me some feedback. Thank you for
visiting my site.

Clear skies,

Dennis Persyk
Igloo Observatory Home Page http://dpersyk.home.att.net
Hampshire, IL

Pier Design Paper: http://home.att.net/~dpersyk/Pier_Design.htm


Re: Anyone designed a limit switch or similar to prvent pier col...

Mark Squicquero
 

Joe,

Good point, but I was thinking only in terms of tracking during long
exposures etc. where the only concern would be the RA drive. I
believe the example given previously was if the mount was left on
inadvertantly or left tracking too long and unatended. If trying to
protect the equipment during slews then your approach would make more
sense. But just off the top of my head, wouldn't reversing the RA
motor prevent any contact regardless of which axis was moving? On
the other hand, would guider input have any effect during a slew? If
an all encompassing approach is the desired outcome then it gets back
to using a logic device of some sort to issue a "stop" command
or ":Q#" through one of the serial ports. I may be wrong (wouldn't
be the first time ;-) ) but it seems like such a device would be
nothing more than a modem capable of replaying keystrokes on command
over an rs232 serial line.

Mark

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Joseph Zeglinski" <J.Zeglinski@...>
wrote:

Mark,

Just one question though. How will you figure out, automatically,
which axis
caused the collision with the pier?

You can't reverse both motors, since if the RA caused the hit,
for
example, reversing the DEC which was in a good position, might get
into more
collisions. If the AP was slewing with both motors, perhaps it's
best to stop,
issue the alarms, and let the human figure out how to untangle the
traffic
mess. Stopping means another relay/breaker, to cut off all DC power
to the
mount. Drastic, but better than putting a ding in the pier :-(

Actually, I faced this same quandary, when I designed my
variation of the
Mel Bartels stepper tracking system (Scope.exe). However, my
circuit version
knew which axis signals were sending stepper pulses to each motor,
so it was
simple to reverse individual motors, while activating (optional)
user selected
alarm devices. In your approach, you only know that the some part
of the scope
has started to strike the pier, so figuring out which way to
reverse, is
difficult. It will handle pier detection during tracking - one axis
reversal -
but I don't see how it can handle two axis slewing with reversal.
Best to stop
the mount altogether, in that situation.

Joe

----- Original Message -----
From: "Mark Squicquero" <docsquic@...>
To: <ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2007 12:41 PM
Subject: [ap-gto] Re: Anyone designed a limit switch or similar to
prvent pier
col...


Joe,

That's a great idea! Very simple and easy to implement, cheap
too.
Just close the circuit on the proper lead of the autoguider port
and
the mount reverses direction until the pressure is off the mat.
The
mount would go into a harmless loop. I suppose some type of time
delay relay could be used to increase the length of time the mount
reverses upon activation so that the mount wouldn't be "shifting
gears" too quickly. The idea of an led and an alarm is good also.
Elagantly simple.


Re: Anyone designed a limit switch or similar to prvent pier col...

Joe Zeglinski
 

Mark,

Just one question though. How will you figure out, automatically, which axis
caused the collision with the pier?

You can't reverse both motors, since if the RA caused the hit, for
example, reversing the DEC which was in a good position, might get into more
collisions. If the AP was slewing with both motors, perhaps it's best to stop,
issue the alarms, and let the human figure out how to untangle the traffic
mess. Stopping means another relay/breaker, to cut off all DC power to the
mount. Drastic, but better than putting a ding in the pier :-(

Actually, I faced this same quandary, when I designed my variation of the
Mel Bartels stepper tracking system (Scope.exe). However, my circuit version
knew which axis signals were sending stepper pulses to each motor, so it was
simple to reverse individual motors, while activating (optional) user selected
alarm devices. In your approach, you only know that the some part of the scope
has started to strike the pier, so figuring out which way to reverse, is
difficult. It will handle pier detection during tracking - one axis reversal -
but I don't see how it can handle two axis slewing with reversal. Best to stop
the mount altogether, in that situation.

Joe

----- Original Message -----
From: "Mark Squicquero" <docsquic@sbcglobal.net>
To: <ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2007 12:41 PM
Subject: [ap-gto] Re: Anyone designed a limit switch or similar to prvent pier
col...


Joe,

That's a great idea! Very simple and easy to implement, cheap too.
Just close the circuit on the proper lead of the autoguider port and
the mount reverses direction until the pressure is off the mat. The
mount would go into a harmless loop. I suppose some type of time
delay relay could be used to increase the length of time the mount
reverses upon activation so that the mount wouldn't be "shifting
gears" too quickly. The idea of an led and an alarm is good also.
Elagantly simple.


Re: Anyone designed a limit switch or similar to prvent pier col...

Mark Squicquero
 

Joe,

That's a great idea! Very simple and easy to implement, cheap too.
Just close the circuit on the proper lead of the autoguider port and
the mount reverses direction until the pressure is off the mat. The
mount would go into a harmless loop. I suppose some type of time
delay relay could be used to increase the length of time the mount
reverses upon activation so that the mount wouldn't be "shifting
gears" too quickly. The idea of an led and an alarm is good also.
Elagantly simple.

Mark


--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Joseph Zeglinski" <J.Zeglinski@...>
wrote:

Hi Mark,


I wonder if you can accomplish your "pressure switched" relay
mount
control by sending a voltage level to the auto guider port pins,
instead of
trying to reverse the phases of the servo motors. With the
autoguider port,
you are effectively just pressing the hand pad direction buttons,
and letting
the CP3 figure out the servo motor commands to reverse the drive
direction,
possibly sounding a quiet audible alarm and/or LED flasher at the
same time,
when collision with the pier is just beginning.

Of course, this would not help with a remote mount, since it
requires
human presence to either take over control, or to shut things down,
in the
alarm condition. But it is an easy, initial design approach, for
the pressure
switch/relay idea.

Joe


Re: Anyone designed a limit switch or similar to prvent pier col...

Steve... <s-walters@...>
 

While not a limit switch idea, a low-tech solution is to buy some thick
foam, 1" or better, and wrap the pier in it. For most (but not all)
collisions, this will prevent damage if you don't set your clutches too
tightly.


Re: Anyone designed a limit switch or similar to prvent pier col...

Joe Zeglinski
 

Sorry Roland,

Thanks for the catch.
Didn't check the specs, but the idea is still correct. Just watch the circuit
implementation.

Joe

----- Original Message -----
From: <chris1011@aol.com>
To: <ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, July 12, 2007 1:42 PM
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: Anyone designed a limit switch or similar to prvent
pier col...


In a message dated 7/12/2007 12:17:18 PM Central Daylight Time,
J.Zeglinski@rogers.com writes:


relay mount
control by sending a voltage level to the auto guider port pins
WOOAA! Don't send any voltage to those pins. They need either an open
circuit
or closed circuit signal - NO VOLTAGE!!

Rolando


**************************************
Get a sneak peak of the all-new
AOL at http://discover.aol.com/memed/aolcom30tour






To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list
see http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gto
Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: Anyone designed a limit switch or similar to prvent pier col...

Joe Zeglinski
 

Hi Mark,


I wonder if you can accomplish your "pressure switched" relay mount
control by sending a voltage level to the auto guider port pins, instead of
trying to reverse the phases of the servo motors. With the autoguider port,
you are effectively just pressing the hand pad direction buttons, and letting
the CP3 figure out the servo motor commands to reverse the drive direction,
possibly sounding a quiet audible alarm and/or LED flasher at the same time,
when collision with the pier is just beginning.

Of course, this would not help with a remote mount, since it requires
human presence to either take over control, or to shut things down, in the
alarm condition. But it is an easy, initial design approach, for the pressure
switch/relay idea.

Joe


Re: Brightest (and Fastest!)Comet in the Sky – Get It now at its Peak

Dennis Persyk <dpersyk@...>
 

Hi Anthony,

At the current relative motion short subframes are the rule! You
can get the relative motion for any comet at
http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/iau/MPEph/MPEph.html
Just be careful to use the *exact* syntax for designating the comet.

The above link shows the comet's relative speed at a blistering 9.2
arc seconds per minute on 7/12 at 0000 UT! At 1.27 arc seconds per
pixel, you could expose for 25 seconds incurring a three-pixel
blur. You maybe could go a tad longer, depending on your seeing.
The comet is not a finely-detailed target, so some blur is
acceptable. I always bin 2x2 on fast moving comets.

I use AstroArt 3.0 for isophotes and colorization. For color I use
the Pallet/Rainbow pick from the menu.

I'll be looking forward to seeing your images!

Clear skies,

Dennis

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "ayiomamitis" <ayiomami@...> wrote:

Hi Dennis,

I sat down last night immediately after the end of astro-twilight
for precisely the same thing.

There is a smile on my face as I read your comment surrounding the
apparent speed of the comet. I started out with 3-min subs and it
was obvious the core was streaking. I went down to 2-min subs and
later 1-min subs but the problem still persisted (I am imaging at
1.27"/pixel).

Finally, with 30-sec subs, everything seemed to fall into place. I
have taken 10 series of LRGB subs and I hope to have a result in a
couple of hours.

Can I get some feedback from you as to how you construct the colour
intensity map as well as the isophote diagram?

Anthony.

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis Persyk" <dpersyk@> wrote:

C/200 VZ13 is nearing its peak on light curve – see
http://www.aerith.net/comet/catalog/2006VZ13/2006VZ13.html
This is presently the brightest comet in the sky. It will be
fading in a week or so.

It is racing though Draco at 8.4 arc seconds per minute at
magnitude ~ 8.4. I was limited to 45 second exposures when I
imaged it to avoid blur.

Let me know what you think of the movie. Note that I have really
squashed the file size to permit rapid down load. It is only 679
kB.

It was really hard for me to stretch all the frames the same
because the high cirrus cloud layer was rapidly changing. I had to
manually adjust each frame to match the previous one. I've probably
invested six hours in image processing and composing the web page.

Images, associated data, eyepiece view, imaging notes and
*movie* all at
http://home.att.net/~dpersyk/new.htm

Please take a look and give me some feedback. This was quite a
processing challenge for me. Thank you for visiting my site.

Clear skies,

Dennis Persyk
Igloo Observatory Home Page http://dpersyk.home.att.net
Hampshire, IL


Re: autoguiding

Jeff Young <jey@...>
 

I had a CP2 controller which induced a high-pitched whine in the RA
motor. No one else who's visited can hear it, but it caused me to
unconciously clench my teeth. In any case, the volume of the whine was
*very* senstive to the gear mesh and the amount of imbalance, so I
repeatedly tried both the complicated and simple meshing procedures.
They produced identical results, so I just do the simple one now.

I've since replaced that CP2 with a CP3, which doesn't whine under any
conditions. Audible (to anyone) sigh of relief....

-- Jeff.



________________________________

From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of chris1011@aol.com
Sent: Thursday, July 12, 2007 8:51 AM
To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] autoguiding



In a message dated 7/11/2007 4:38:52 PM Central Daylight Time,
nitemike1@yahoo.com <mailto:nitemike1%40yahoo.com> writes:

> In reading the manual it looks like it is a little bit
complicated to
> tighten the dec gear mesh for someone who is all thumbs.

I agree that the procedure on the website perhpas needs to be
updated. The
way I do it is to simply loosen the 2 screws that hold the motor
gearbox to the
bracket, press gently inward with your thumb or finger, and then
tighten the
screws. That's it. You have meshed the gear fully and you are
done.

Rolando

**************************************
Get a sneak peak of the all-new
AOL at http://discover.aol.com/memed/aolcom30tour
<http://discover.aol.com/memed/aolcom30tour>


Re: Brightest (and Fastest!)Comet in the Sky – Get It now at its Peak

ayiomamitis
 

Hi Dennis,

I sat down last night immediately after the end of astro-twilight for
precisely the same thing.

There is a smile on my face as I read your comment surrounding the
apparent speed of the comet. I started out with 3-min subs and it was
obvious the core was streaking. I went down to 2-min subs and later
1-min subs but the problem still persisted (I am imaging at 1.27"/pixel).

Finally, with 30-sec subs, everything seemed to fall into place. I
have taken 10 series of LRGB subs and I hope to have a result in a
couple of hours.

Can I get some feedback from you as to how you construct the colour
intensity map as well as the isophote diagram?

Anthony.

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis Persyk" <dpersyk@...> wrote:

C/200 VZ13 is nearing its peak on light curve – see
http://www.aerith.net/comet/catalog/2006VZ13/2006VZ13.html
This is presently the brightest comet in the sky. It will be fading
in a week or so.

It is racing though Draco at 8.4 arc seconds per minute at magnitude
~ 8.4. I was limited to 45 second exposures when I imaged it to
avoid blur.

Let me know what you think of the movie. Note that I have really
squashed the file size to permit rapid down load. It is only 679 kB.

It was really hard for me to stretch all the frames the same because
the high cirrus cloud layer was rapidly changing. I had to manually
adjust each frame to match the previous one. I've probably invested
six hours in image processing and composing the web page.

Images, associated data, eyepiece view, imaging notes and *movie*
all at
http://home.att.net/~dpersyk/new.htm

Please take a look and give me some feedback. This was quite a
processing challenge for me. Thank you for visiting my site.

Clear skies,

Dennis Persyk
Igloo Observatory Home Page http://dpersyk.home.att.net
Hampshire, IL


Re: Anyone designed a limit switch or similar to prvent pier col...

Mark Squicquero
 

Roland,

Yes, I understand that you simply can't plug into the serial port or
modify the RA drive cable. I was simply theorizing and meant to use
the switch somehow in the appropriate circuit to accomplish this in
hardware. My posting wasn't too complete, sorry for the
misunderstanding. I may be electronically challenged ;-) , but I
have seen small stand alone controllers etc. that can be interfaced
with a variety of devices. It wouldn't seem all that difficult to
use a microcontroller to send the appropriate signals to the mount
just like planetarium software does. My mention of the RA circuit
was in the same vein: some type of interface to intercept the servo
controller signals and inject the reverse signal at the appropriate
time. I realize that the complexity of the closed loop servo system
would make this difficult or impossible, but hey, it's just an idea.
The only reason I mentioned it was due to the use of the two serial
ports on the mount by a variety of other functions. If on the other
hand, this type of circuit was implemented during the manufacture of
the GTO controller, then a small switch port could be placed on the
box and the pressure mat simply plugged into it. Another feature for
the GTOCP4 controller! By the way, I second the vote for a 4 port
USB 2.0 hub.

Mark



--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, chris1011@... wrote:

In a message dated 7/11/2007 9:32:52 AM Central Daylight Time,
docsquic@... writes:


I suppose that this
could all be done in such a way that it could be interfaced using
one
of the serial ports or even interconnected with the RA drive
motor (a
dc motor that should respond to reverse polarity, yes/no).
NO! The motor wires must not be messed with. The motor isd in a
servo loop.
It is not just attached to some voltage source which makes it turn.
The motor
is controlled via signals from its built-in shaft encoder, and
trying to
reverse the wires will send it into an unconrolled high speed
runaway mode. besides,
if the servo senses any kind of discrepancy with the shaft
position/direction/speed with respect to the commanded ones, it
will go into safe mode (motor
stall mode) and shut down until the problem has been resolved.

The serial ports require a software language protocol and cannot be
controlled in any manner by a mere electrical voltage or signal.
There is a huge
difference between the digital world of software and the analog
world of electrical
signals. In order for one to talk to the other, you need an
electronic circuit
in between the two that converts one world into the other.

Roland Christen


**************************************
See what's free at
http://www.aol.com.


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Anyone designed a limit switch or similar to prvent pier col...

Roland Christen
 

In a message dated 7/12/2007 12:17:18 PM Central Daylight Time,
J.Zeglinski@rogers.com writes:


relay mount
control by sending a voltage level to the auto guider port pins
WOOAA! Don't send any voltage to those pins. They need either an open circuit
or closed circuit signal - NO VOLTAGE!!

Rolando


**************************************
Get a sneak peak of the all-new
AOL at http://discover.aol.com/memed/aolcom30tour


Re: autoguiding

Roland Christen
 

In a message dated 7/11/2007 4:38:52 PM Central Daylight Time,
nitemike1@yahoo.com writes:


In reading the manual it looks like it is a little bit complicated to
tighten the dec gear mesh for someone who is all thumbs.
I agree that the procedure on the website perhpas needs to be updated. The
way I do it is to simply loosen the 2 screws that hold the motor gearbox to the
bracket, press gently inward with your thumb or finger, and then tighten the
screws. That's it. You have meshed the gear fully and you are done.

Rolando


**************************************
Get a sneak peak of the all-new
AOL at http://discover.aol.com/memed/aolcom30tour