Date   

Re: Mach1GTO Questions

observe_m13
 

Same reason it was 'knurled' in the latest versions, to make it easier
to pull cables through the mount. As per the New features for 2007 on
the AP web page for the Mach1:

Knurled Grip on the Polar Scope Adapter - We have added knurling to
the polar scope adapter to facilitate easier removal when taking
advantage of the Mach1GTO's innovative "through the mount" cabling
capabilities.

The small hole provided by the removal of the PAS cap is insufficient
to thread through the multitude of cables required by the CCD, filter
wheel, guider and focusing devices. In total there are a minimum of 6
cables to run for this not including the mount motor cables. I had
been draping all these cables outside along the knobs for the
telescope mounting plate but this has caused some difficulties when
they hang up on something. Best place for them is through the end of
the polar axis. I know that I could run them through the side port but
it is just one more kink to try and fish or thread something through.
As it is, if possible, I start at the dovetail plate end, letting
gravity take them down through the mount and then dropping them
straight out the bottom of the polar axis. As of now I have had to
fish them out with a hooked wire. If that entire end cap comes off it
will be coming off whenever I use the mount for photo use.

--- In ap-gto@..., chris1011@... wrote:

In a message dated 7/1/2007 12:11:56 AM Central Daylight Time,
JunkMailGoesHere@... writes:


I have not
been able to get the large polar scope adapter from the end.
What would be the reason to remove this?

Rolando


**************************************
See what's free at
http://www.aol.com.




Re: computer startup sequence question

Mal Speer <mal@...>
 

Just one more question relating to the same topic.
If after going to an object using a planetarium program can you
center the object using the keypad NSEW buttons without doing any
harm?
Mal

--- In ap-gto@..., "Howard" <howard@...> wrote:

See some comments below.



Mag. 7 skies!



Howard Hedlund

Astro-Physics, Inc.

815-282-1513

________________________________

From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...] On
Behalf
Of astrokattner
Sent: Sunday, July 01, 2007 6:55 PM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: [ap-gto] computer startup sequence question



Hello all,

I'm using an AP900 GTO (vintage 2007). I am a portable user,so I
have
to set up new each time. I generally start up using my laptop on
Autoconnect:EXT. I do this using the SKY6 so the SKY sends my
laptop
time to the mount. I have also noticed that the SKY sends location,
date as well as the GMT offset when starting up. I'm peeking into
the mount using pulseguide to see what is going on.

I also start up with the mount leveled in the reference park no. 1
position.

Since you are using PulseGuide anyway, use it to initialize the
mount.
It also will send the laptop's time and all other pertinent
information
to the mount, and it allows you to resume from one of the A-P park
positions - Park 1 in this case, thus establishing the mount's
orientation. Then connect with the Sky 6, and you should be able
to
send a GoTo without a hitch. (You might want to watch the mount
carefully during this first slew, just to be sure.)



When I link and connect to the scope in the SKY, the Pulseguide
readouts tell me the mount has the correct time and location data.
However, pulseguide shows me that the mount is not sure what side
of
the meredian it is on. If I slew to a star using the SKY, the mount
eventually figures ot what side of the meridian it is on, because
pulseguide begins reporting the correct side of the mount from what
I
can see.

As mentioned above, initializing with PulseGuide and resuming from
reference Park 1 in PulseGuide should solve this.



My main question is: where in this process should I sync? I need to
do a sync to let the mount know which end is up. And further to the
point, can I sync with the SKY or do I need to use the key pad? If
I
consult the user manual for the keypad it has a section beginning
on
page 67 that describes how to use the mount with the SKY. It says
in
step 5, "This procedure is only necessary if your telescope is not
pointing to the position indicated by the white crosshair circle
when
you establish your link. By syncing, you will tell the SKY where
your telescope is pointing."

Is this what is really going on? When I sync with the SKY isn't it
really sending a sync command to the mount along with the
coordinates
for the object? So I am not really telling the SKY where the
telescope is pointing, rather, I am updating the mount definition
of
where it is?

Please read Roland's earlier post on Synch and Re-Cal. It is very
important to understand the distinction!

In the instruction you refer to from the keypad manual, you are
manually
moving the telescope to a known star - not slewing there. If you
do
that, then neither the mount, nor the computer knows where you are
pointing, and BOTH are given that information by your first
clicking on
the star to select it, and then using the Synch command. If you
started by resuming from reference Park 1 in Pulseguide, you
probably
were able to simply slew to your first target. At that point,
what you
are really trying to do is to re-calibrate, but as Roland pointed
out,
The Sky does not offer that option. Therefore be VERY cautious
when
using the Synch command to calibrate your position.

I hope this is helpful.





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: computer startup sequence question

Howard Hedlund
 

See some comments below.



Mag. 7 skies!



Howard Hedlund

Astro-Physics, Inc.

815-282-1513

________________________________

From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...] On Behalf
Of astrokattner
Sent: Sunday, July 01, 2007 6:55 PM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: [ap-gto] computer startup sequence question



Hello all,

I'm using an AP900 GTO (vintage 2007). I am a portable user,so I have
to set up new each time. I generally start up using my laptop on
Autoconnect:EXT. I do this using the SKY6 so the SKY sends my laptop
time to the mount. I have also noticed that the SKY sends location,
date as well as the GMT offset when starting up. I'm peeking into
the mount using pulseguide to see what is going on.

I also start up with the mount leveled in the reference park no. 1
position.

Since you are using PulseGuide anyway, use it to initialize the mount.
It also will send the laptop's time and all other pertinent information
to the mount, and it allows you to resume from one of the A-P park
positions - Park 1 in this case, thus establishing the mount's
orientation. Then connect with the Sky 6, and you should be able to
send a GoTo without a hitch. (You might want to watch the mount
carefully during this first slew, just to be sure.)



When I link and connect to the scope in the SKY, the Pulseguide
readouts tell me the mount has the correct time and location data.
However, pulseguide shows me that the mount is not sure what side of
the meredian it is on. If I slew to a star using the SKY, the mount
eventually figures ot what side of the meridian it is on, because
pulseguide begins reporting the correct side of the mount from what I
can see.

As mentioned above, initializing with PulseGuide and resuming from
reference Park 1 in PulseGuide should solve this.



My main question is: where in this process should I sync? I need to
do a sync to let the mount know which end is up. And further to the
point, can I sync with the SKY or do I need to use the key pad? If I
consult the user manual for the keypad it has a section beginning on
page 67 that describes how to use the mount with the SKY. It says in
step 5, "This procedure is only necessary if your telescope is not
pointing to the position indicated by the white crosshair circle when
you establish your link. By syncing, you will tell the SKY where
your telescope is pointing."

Is this what is really going on? When I sync with the SKY isn't it
really sending a sync command to the mount along with the coordinates
for the object? So I am not really telling the SKY where the
telescope is pointing, rather, I am updating the mount definition of
where it is?

Please read Roland's earlier post on Synch and Re-Cal. It is very
important to understand the distinction!

In the instruction you refer to from the keypad manual, you are manually
moving the telescope to a known star - not slewing there. If you do
that, then neither the mount, nor the computer knows where you are
pointing, and BOTH are given that information by your first clicking on
the star to select it, and then using the Synch command. If you
started by resuming from reference Park 1 in Pulseguide, you probably
were able to simply slew to your first target. At that point, what you
are really trying to do is to re-calibrate, but as Roland pointed out,
The Sky does not offer that option. Therefore be VERY cautious when
using the Synch command to calibrate your position.

I hope this is helpful.


Re: computer startup sequence question

Roland Christen
 

If you always start with a fresh setup, why not use the keypad? Why mess
around with other programs? Once you start with the keypad, simply connect your
computer to the mount via the RS232 com port, and do a simple Link with The Sky.
No Sync required. You can then slew around the sky to your heart's content
via The Sky.

You are making things difficult for yourself with the keypad in EXT. That
function should really be used only in permanent setups where you would always
start up from a known park position. In your case you do not need the computer
to start your mounting, the keypad will do things correctly and accurately.

In other words, place the scope on the west side of the mount, level, facing
due north to the horizon. Start the keypad in Autostart "NO". Select Location.
Select "Resume from Ref-Park 1". You are done. Now you can slew to any object
via keypad or The Sky and center it. With the keypad you can use Rcal after
slewing to a known object and centering it. If you slew via The Sky, you will
need to use Sync function in The Sky. Be sure not to slew to any object very
near the meridian because it might be close enough to go past the meridian if
you center it.

Your other question about whether the mount would slew to the wrong side when
using The sky near the pole - NO, the mount will ALWAYS put the scope on the
proper side, regardless where you are in declination, even right next to the
North Pole. It will always do this (with keypad or with The Sky sending a goto)
unless you purposely place the mount past the meridian and then do a sync on
an object past the meridian. By doing that, you have told the mount that you
wish the scope to be the counterweight and the counterweight to be the scope.
It will dutifully function as you wish.

Rolando


**************************************
See what's free at
http://www.aol.com.


Re: computer startup sequence question

Roland Christen
 

In a message dated 7/2/2007 2:30:07 PM Central Daylight Time,
mal@... writes:


Just one more question relating to the same topic.
If after going to an object using a planetarium program can you
center the object using the keypad NSEW buttons without doing any
harm?
Mal
Of course you can center the object with the buttons. In fact, you can go
anywhere in the sky with the keypad buttons at any of the guide, centering or
slewing rates. The servo will always know where it is, and so will your
planetarium program. When you do center the object in your eyepiece, it may not appear
centered on your planetarium program - i.e. the cursor may now be off to one
side. In order to redefine the cursor to be on top of the object (star, nebula,
etc.) then you must do a sync with your planetarium program, which basically
brings the object data library in your planetarium program up, and sends that
RA/Dec number to the mount to replace the now slightly different number in the
servo memory.

Rolando


**************************************
See what's free at
http://www.aol.com.


Re: Using ONE serial port for shutter AND telescope control ?

Joe Zeglinski
 

Thanks Howard,

Just what I needed,

Joe

----- Original Message -----
From: "Howard" <howard@...>
To: <ap-gto@...>
Sent: Monday, July 02, 2007 10:32 AM
Subject: RE: [ap-gto] Using ONE serial port for shutter AND telescope control
?


Hi Joe,



Here's the RS232 pinout that we have in technical support:



http://www.astro-physics.com/tech_support/mounts/servo/gtors232port.pdf



Hope it helps.



Mag. 7 skies!



Howard Hedlund

Astro-Physics, Inc.

815-282-1513


Re: Using ONE serial port for shutter AND telescope control ?

Howard Hedlund
 

Hi Joe,



Here's the RS232 pinout that we have in technical support:



http://www.astro-physics.com/tech_support/mounts/servo/gtors232port.pdf



Hope it helps.



Mag. 7 skies!



Howard Hedlund

Astro-Physics, Inc.

815-282-1513

________________________________

From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...] On Behalf
Of Joseph Zeglinski
Sent: Sunday, July 01, 2007 9:37 PM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: [ap-gto] Using ONE serial port for shutter AND telescope
control ?



Hi,

I posted this idea on the DSLRFocus group, and wanted to ask here, if
there would be any "serial port signal conflicts" on my AP900 GTOCP3
controller.

I have a working LED version DSLR shutter release cable, and it seems a
waste to use the one laptop serial port, just to toggle the RTS signal
line to
fire a shutter. Then use a second serial port, wasting a USB port plus a

USB/Serial dongle, to drive the mount either via the Auto Guider port,
or one
of the two serial external control ports. On top of that, there is the
need
for two serial cables, all the way back to the laptop, to perform the
two
services of firing a shutter and remotely operating the mount.

Since the shutter release RTS signal isn't required by the AP900, then
there should be no conflict with driving both sets of signals, in one
cable,
to two devices. The camera end never sees all the other signals, and
"hopefully", the GTOCP3 is only wired to the Transmit/Receive and common

ground pins (so RTS toggling should not affect it's normal operation,
with a
planetarium program).

If this would work, for astro photography:
1.. You would need just one serial cable to the mount - the nearby
shutter
release two wire cable, would be just about a couple of feet long, at
most,
plugged into the LED firing circuit inside the DB9 clam shell, at the
panel.

2.. This would save wasting a second computer serial port, or a USB port

along with a USB/Serial dongle.

3.. One less cable to trip over, tangle around the mount, or need to be
packed up every time.
The AP900 user manual (Appendix: B pg. 86) states: "the serial ports do
not
use X-On/X-Off, or hardware flow control" - (RTS/CTS) - which in this
case
would be an advantage. I couldn't find any AP900 wiring diagrams for the

GTOCP3 serial ports, to show potential conflicts.

Can anyone verify that the GTOCP3 serial ports are wired for "just" the
3
signal wires - so they would be blind to the presence of an RTS shutter
release signal?

The only possible problem with this approach might still be that the
ASCOM
serial port drivers won't share a common port, with two programs.

Any feedback would be most welcome.

Thanks,
Joe


Re: computer startup sequence question

Roland Christen
 

In a message dated 7/1/2007 6:56:06 PM Central Daylight Time,
kattnerk@... writes:


My main question is: where in this process should I sync? I need to
do a sync to let the mount know which end is up. And further to the
point, can I sync with the SKY or do I need to use the key pad? If I
consult the user manual for the keypad it has a section beginning on
page 67 that describes how to use the mount with the SKY. It says in
step 5, "This procedure is only necessary if your telescope is not
pointing to the position indicated by the white crosshair circle when
you establish your link. By syncing, you will tell the SKY where
your telescope is pointing."
The mount always knows where it is, even after you have turned off the power
and re-started it at a later date. It knows this because it stores each of the
axis angles at power down. These angles are automatically calculated to be RA
and DEc numbers the moment that you send accurate time, location and date to
the mount (via keypad or via an external source - either one). Therefore, you
never need to Sync if you do not move the axes by hand via the clutches. The
mount also knows which side the scope is on (unless you move the scope by hand
with the clutches loose).

The reason you would use Sync is for setting up the mount for the first time,
or after your scope/mount has been disassembled after the last session and
moved to another location. Sync then not only tells the mount where your scope
is pointing in the sky, but also configures your mount/scope for the scope to
be on the proper side of the mounting for all subsequent objects (unless you
have placed the scope past the meridian, in which case all other objects will be
accessed past the meridian and underneath the mount).

In the keypad, we use Rcal to modify or center an object that we have just
slewed to. You need this because sometimes you cannot get a perfect go-to and
you need to center an object. This simply updates the RA/Dec position of the
servo to that of the object in the data library. Since popular planetarium
programs do not have anything other than Sync in their software (which is fine for
fork mounted SCTs because they do not have the past-the-meridian-problem), you
will then have no choice but to use this function if you want to center an
object and update its position.

With Sync, you run the risc of going slightly past the meridian to center an
object, which then re-defines the mount/scope configuration for all subsequent
slews with the scope going underneath the mount. So, unless the planetarium
software people update this and add an Rcal function to their programs, it will
remain risky to use this willy-nilly. Rcal of course will not redefine the
mount/scope, so that you can use this function with the scope well past the
meridian (for example after you have imaged for 1-2 hours and allowed the object
to track past the meridian).

Rcal in the keypad can ONLY be used after you have slewed to an object in the
KEYPAD, not after you have slewed to an object with external software because
the keypad has no way of knowing that you have slewed to Sharpless 1234567
(this type of identifying data is never sent to the mount from your external 3rd
party software, so there is no way of knowing this either in the servo or in
the keypad). It only knows that you previously slewed to M1 with the keypad.
Do not mix up Sync and Rcal features between keypad and external software, or
you will quickly find out what it means for the mount to be lost - you have
steered it into the ditch!

Rolando


**************************************
See what's free at
http://www.aol.com.


Re: Mach1GTO Questions

Roland Christen
 

In a message dated 7/1/2007 12:11:56 AM Central Daylight Time,
JunkMailGoesHere@... writes:


I have not
been able to get the large polar scope adapter from the end.
What would be the reason to remove this?

Rolando


**************************************
See what's free at
http://www.aol.com.


Re: Using ONE serial port for shutter AND telescope control ?

Glenn Wallace <glenn@...>
 

Hardware wise I can't imagine any issues. The problem is you probably would need to write a customer ASCOM driver that shares the port between controlling the AP and triggering the shutter.


Using ONE serial port for shutter AND telescope control ?

Joe Zeglinski
 

Hi,

I posted this idea on the DSLRFocus group, and wanted to ask here, if
there would be any "serial port signal conflicts" on my AP900 GTOCP3
controller.

I have a working LED version DSLR shutter release cable, and it seems a
waste to use the one laptop serial port, just to toggle the RTS signal line to
fire a shutter. Then use a second serial port, wasting a USB port plus a
USB/Serial dongle, to drive the mount either via the Auto Guider port, or one
of the two serial external control ports. On top of that, there is the need
for two serial cables, all the way back to the laptop, to perform the two
services of firing a shutter and remotely operating the mount.

Since the shutter release RTS signal isn't required by the AP900, then
there should be no conflict with driving both sets of signals, in one cable,
to two devices. The camera end never sees all the other signals, and
"hopefully", the GTOCP3 is only wired to the Transmit/Receive and common
ground pins (so RTS toggling should not affect it's normal operation, with a
planetarium program).

If this would work, for astro photography:
1.. You would need just one serial cable to the mount - the nearby shutter
release two wire cable, would be just about a couple of feet long, at most,
plugged into the LED firing circuit inside the DB9 clam shell, at the panel.

2.. This would save wasting a second computer serial port, or a USB port
along with a USB/Serial dongle.

3.. One less cable to trip over, tangle around the mount, or need to be
packed up every time.
The AP900 user manual (Appendix: B pg. 86) states: "the serial ports do not
use X-On/X-Off, or hardware flow control" - (RTS/CTS) - which in this case
would be an advantage. I couldn't find any AP900 wiring diagrams for the
GTOCP3 serial ports, to show potential conflicts.

Can anyone verify that the GTOCP3 serial ports are wired for "just" the 3
signal wires - so they would be blind to the presence of an RTS shutter
release signal?

The only possible problem with this approach might still be that the ASCOM
serial port drivers won't share a common port, with two programs.

Any feedback would be most welcome.

Thanks,
Joe


Re: Mach1GTO on pimped out AP wood tripod

MrGrytt
 

--- In ap-gto@..., "Paul Gustafson" <laservet@...> wrote:

I pimped out my AP wood tripod for my Mach1GTO with a Lapides spreader
(not pictured), control box bracket, solid tray, and eyepiece tray.
Pics are in the Mach1GTO folder in the Photos section of this group.

:-P

Paul Gustafson
Paul,
That really is a great looking setup. Have you used the tripod
enough to know if there is a weight limit that you would recommend
staying below?

Harvey


Mach1 GTO/Mewlon 250

Brian Guerin
 

I just got my Mach1 last week and it really is an incredible mount.
For the M250 owners I thought I would post my setup experience. First
of all you will require two 18 lb CW's with the short 10.7"x 1.875"
shaft. This is just barely enough weight, both CW's sit at the end of
the shaft. Initially, I put the Q4047 adapter on the mount, this
changed the balance just enough that the mount was 2 lbs top heavy. I
used an amp meter to balance everything, and w/o the Q4047 adapter it
balanced perfectly (with a telrad on the front end of the OTA, a
Televue 27mm panoptic at the other end, a Robin Casady 8" saddle and
Robin Casady's M250 dovetail bar). I know this attention to balance
may seem anal, but I did it just for fun, seeing Roland mentioned the
procedure in an earlier post. I matched the amp's in both directions
in RA and DEC, it was very interesting.

I estimate without the amp meter, just balancing it by feel, the most
I was out was 3 to 4 lbs. For those wondering why I'm even talking
about balance on the Mach1, it's fairly stiff when loaded up with
equipment and has to be considerably out of balance before an
imbalance is noticable.

I purchased the Q4047 adapter thinking my focusing cord might get in
the way of the RA drive box, this isn't a problem. This means I have
a Q4047 for sale if anyone wants one.

My M250 with the all the accessories I mentioned above including
saddle, dovetail bar and eyepiece, weighs 38 lbs. The CW shaft and
weights, weigh in at 43.7 lbs. The 80% rule for CW's vs OTA doesn't
seem to work that well on the Mach1.

I've both the 6" portable pier and the wood tripod and both offer
excellent support.

My first night out all went extremely well and the keypad really is
easy to use, however when I slewed to the star for the sync
procedure, I couldn't figure out how to get back to the sync page,
reading the directions again solved that problem. With the very small
FOV on the M250, objects were normally in or just outside the FOV on
long slews and always in the FOV in shorter slews. Recalibrating
occassionally on objects improved the accuracy.

Thanks AP,
Brian


computer startup sequence question

astrokattner
 

Hello all,

I'm using an AP900 GTO (vintage 2007). I am a portable user,so I have
to set up new each time. I generally start up using my laptop on
Autoconnect:EXT. I do this using the SKY6 so the SKY sends my laptop
time to the mount. I have also noticed that the SKY sends location,
date as well as the GMT offset when starting up. I'm peeking into
the mount using pulseguide to see what is going on.

I also start up with the mount leveled in the reference park no. 1
position.

When I link and connect to the scope in the SKY, the Pulseguide
readouts tell me the mount has the correct time and location data.
However, pulseguide shows me that the mount is not sure what side of
the meredian it is on. If I slew to a star using the SKY, the mount
eventually figures ot what side of the meridian it is on, because
pulseguide begins reporting the correct side of the mount from what I
can see.

My main question is: where in this process should I sync? I need to
do a sync to let the mount know which end is up. And further to the
point, can I sync with the SKY or do I need to use the key pad? If I
consult the user manual for the keypad it has a section beginning on
page 67 that describes how to use the mount with the SKY. It says in
step 5, "This procedure is only necessary if your telescope is not
pointing to the position indicated by the white crosshair circle when
you establish your link. By syncing, you will tell the SKY where
your telescope is pointing."

Is this what is really going on? When I sync with the SKY isn't it
really sending a sync command to the mount along with the coordinates
for the object? So I am not really telling the SKY where the
telescope is pointing, rather, I am updating the mount definition of
where it is?


Mach1GTO on pimped out AP wood tripod

Paul Gustafson
 

I pimped out my AP wood tripod for my Mach1GTO with a Lapides spreader
(not pictured), control box bracket, solid tray, and eyepiece tray.
Pics are in the Mach1GTO folder in the Photos section of this group.

:-P

Paul Gustafson


AP Wooden Tripod vs. Portable Pier

MrGrytt
 

I'm fairly confident that the AP wooden tripod is as good as they
get but I'm not sure what to expect compared to a typical portable pier.
Does anyone have any experience with the AP wooden tripod
carrying a load such as the Mach 1 loaded to capacity? I don't see a
load limit listed on the AP site so I'm not sure how much to expect
the tripod to hold solidly.
Any comments would be appreciated.

Harvey


Re: Mach1GTO Questions

observe_m13
 

Hi Roland,

Speaking about the Mach1GTO and internal cable routing, I have not
been able to get the large polar scope adapter from the end. I don't
recall there being a hole to slip a screwdriver into for some extra
leverage. Is it possible to get one of those knurled adapters as
supplied on the new mounts?

As well, there are a few pics on the AP web site which show how cables
are routed through the mount.

--- In ap-gto@..., "Rick K" <JunkMailGoesHere@...> wrote:

As far as I know there are no drawings of the internals of the
Mach1GTO. There are holes which go through the centers of each shaft
from top to bottom and also exit/entrance ports on the sides midpoint
of each shaft. All bearings and loading surfaces appear to be
contained in the upper half of each shaft.

If you are not already on the AP400/600 list from about 4 years ago,
then you had best sign up now. You will probably have another couple
of years before you get a chance at one.



--- In ap-gto@..., "s.linhart" <s.linhart@> wrote:

Hi Folks!

After several years of abstinence, i wanted to restart my hobby.
4 years ago I sold my G11. I was always happy with it.
So my homemade 8" F/6 Newtonian is looking for a new base.
The telescope weighs about 15kg. (about 20kg-25kg with CCD camera,
finder, aditional lenses etc.) The G11 had no problems with this load.
Will the Mach1
be at least as sturdy as the G11?

Another question:

Are there any photos or drawings with the internals of the mount.
I´m very interested how AP realized the cable feed through System.


Clear Skys


Re: Laser guided polar alignment

Jon L Williams <bengoshi@...>
 

Were this even reasonably feasible, one would run a serious risk of
aircraft interference and the potential resulting FAA consequences.

At 08:38 PM 6/29/2007 -0400, you wrote:

Ok, this might be dumb but I wonder if either a single laser beam could be
split into several precisely aimed beams (or just several separate lasers)
could be made to point at several of the brightest stars directly around the
NCP when correctly aligned?
Gedas

<http://gedas.cc>http://gedas.cc
www.w8bya.com

----- Original Message -----
From: <<mailto:chris1011%40aol.com>chris1011@...>
To: <<mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com>ap-gto@...>
Sent: Friday, June 29, 2007 6:11 PM
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Laser guided polar alignment

In a message dated 6/29/2007 5:06:14 PM Central Daylight Time,
<mailto:jamesw767%40yahoo.com>jamesw767@... writes:

Is there a way to put a green laser into the Ap 900 polar alignment
view. so you can point The green laser toward Polaris You won't need
to look to the Puller alignment scope Only for fine tuning
You probably can make some sort of adapter, but Polaris is not at the North
Pole. It's off by 3/4 degree.

Rolando

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Re: Laser guided polar alignment

Jeff <jlc@...>
 

How about machining the laser into the polar axis cap on the DEC shaft
housing? Yep, just bore it out in the drillpress. B^)

I used a laser once or twice with the G11 by just sticking it up the bore.

Btw, don't forget about the "daytime polar alignment" routine as described
in the manual.
This is the method where you use park1 and park2 and a visible object (e.g.
moon, venus, sun-if-you-are-careful) to roughly align the ALT and AZ.

Fwiw, I used the "daytime" approach last weekend at a site where I volunteer
to show the night sky to visitors.
I was able to polar align sufficiently in the daytime to be able to do a
goto to saturn and observe it well before darkness.
In fact saturn was initially barely visible in the telescope (at any mag)
due to the lack of contrast. It was totally not visible in the finder
scope.

Good stuff.




_____

From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...] On Behalf Of
chris1011@...
Sent: Friday, June 29, 2007 3:11 PM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Laser guided polar alignment



In a message dated 6/29/2007 5:06:14 PM Central Daylight Time,
jamesw767@yahoo. <mailto:jamesw767%40yahoo.com> com writes:

Is there a way to put a green laser into the Ap 900 polar alignment
view. so you can point The green laser toward Polaris You won't need
to look to the Puller alignment scope Only for fine tuning
You probably can make some sort of adapter, but Polaris is not at the North
Pole. It's off by 3/4 degree.

Rolando

**************************************
See what's free at
http://www.aol. <http://www.aol.com.> com.


Re: Laser guided polar alignment

Gedas
 

Ok, this might be dumb but I wonder if either a single laser beam could be
split into several precisely aimed beams (or just several separate lasers)
could be made to point at several of the brightest stars directly around the
NCP when correctly aligned?
Gedas

http://gedas.cc
www.w8bya.com

----- Original Message -----
From: <chris1011@...>
To: <ap-gto@...>
Sent: Friday, June 29, 2007 6:11 PM
Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Laser guided polar alignment


In a message dated 6/29/2007 5:06:14 PM Central Daylight Time,
jamesw767@... writes:


Is there a way to put a green laser into the Ap 900 polar alignment
view. so you can point The green laser toward Polaris You won't need
to look to the Puller alignment scope Only for fine tuning
You probably can make some sort of adapter, but Polaris is not at the North
Pole. It's off by 3/4 degree.

Rolando


**************************************
See what's free at
http://www.aol.com.






To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list
see http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gto
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