Date   

Re: Wireless control of AP900?

Gedas
 

Hi Richard, I am getting close to going down this path as well and when I
ordered my new laptop 6 months ago I asked myself the same question. But
for me is was an easy answer. The bluetooth option was like $30 more so I
had it installed at the time of purchase. A small cost considering the
overall cost of the pc. My advice, get it installed now and if you find a
solution you will be prepared.
Gedas

http://gedas.cc
www.w8bya.com

----- Original Message -----
From: "Richard Kinsey" <richard.kinsey@tiscali.co.uk>
To: <ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, June 02, 2007 1:46 PM
Subject: [ap-gto] Wireless control of AP900?


Not being particularly knowledgeable on the subject of wireless devices
and bluetooth, I would be grateful if someone could enlighten me on the
possibility/method of controlling my AP900GTO via bluetooth or another
wireless device. I am in the process of ordering a new notebook/laptop
computer and am wondering whether it is worth having bluetooth
installed. Thanks in advance, Richard



To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list
see http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gto
Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Wireless control of AP900?

Roland Christen
 

In a message dated 6/2/2007 4:54:47 PM Central Daylight Time,
jlc@sbcglobal.net writes:


I'm waiting for a wireless version of the AP handpad. Sure would be nice
to eliminate that cable!
Keypad takes a lot of power to run. A battery would not last long. It is an
industrial product with a ruggedized readout that goes down to -40F. The
readout takes most of the power. It is not like a TV remote, which has no readout,
and where you see the info on the TV screen.

Rolando


**************************************
See what's free at
http://www.aol.com.


Wireless control of AP900?

Richard Kinsey
 

Not being particularly knowledgeable on the subject of wireless devices
and bluetooth, I would be grateful if someone could enlighten me on the
possibility/method of controlling my AP900GTO via bluetooth or another
wireless device. I am in the process of ordering a new notebook/laptop
computer and am wondering whether it is worth having bluetooth
installed. Thanks in advance, Richard


Re: rs 232 to usb conversion

Joe Zeglinski
 

Hi,

I wonder why you needed to turn off the firewall and wireless.
If the Anywhere USB is Ethernet compatible, then you should be able to just
add it's address to the current permitted firewall list - (or even enter a
range of addresses, in Norton Firewall Allowed List).
I'm not familiar with the Anywhere product, so I would be interested in any
such limitations.

Joe

----- Original Message -----
From: "mizzou156" <mizzou156@yahoo.com>
To: <ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 5:56 PM
Subject: [ap-gto] rs 232 to usb conversion


A big THANK YOU to all the folks that provided input as to how to go
about doing the rs232 to usb conversion. Thanks to you, I was able to
do the conversion and control the telescope from over 100 feet away via
an ethernet connection. I utilized an Anywhere Usb/5 adapter from IO
Gear and their rs232 to usb Edgeport/2 converter. CAT5E cable
(utilized as a crossover cable...not straight thru) allowed me to
connect the computer directly to the Anywhere Usb hub. All firewalls
and wireless connections had to be turned off.......Mizzou



To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list
see http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gto
Yahoo! Groups Links




rs 232 to usb conversion

mizzou156 <mizzou156@...>
 

A big THANK YOU to all the folks that provided input as to how to go
about doing the rs232 to usb conversion. Thanks to you, I was able to
do the conversion and control the telescope from over 100 feet away via
an ethernet connection. I utilized an Anywhere Usb/5 adapter from IO
Gear and their rs232 to usb Edgeport/2 converter. CAT5E cable
(utilized as a crossover cable...not straight thru) allowed me to
connect the computer directly to the Anywhere Usb hub. All firewalls
and wireless connections had to be turned off.......Mizzou


Re: another 600 goto question, drag

Dale Ireland <drdale_com@...>
 

OK.. I tried it. I live near Seattle. The only fish we have here are
Salmon. I got the smallest one I could find but it is still 15lbs. No matter
where I hang it on the mount it is still 15lbs. TIP: Also, this might work
in a cold climate but here in the summer I discovered that you really need
to keep it frozen or it will attract critters at night.
Dale

-----Original Message-----
From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com]
On Behalf Of Howard

In the mean time, if balancing is a problem,
get yourself a small fisherman's scale of the type used to weigh
bluegills or crappies. Use it on the counterweight shaft safety knob
to pull up and down to balance RA. Hook it on an adapter
thumb-screw at
the end of the focuser and pull up and down to balance dec.
If you are
balanced, the scale will measure the same in each direction,
even if there is resistance from the bearings.

Howard Hedlund


Re: another 600 goto question, drag

Howard Hedlund
 

Hi again Mr. Ireland,



The 900 and 600E are completely different in the way the bearings are
designed. The 900 and 1200 use rollers that make the movement truly
effortless when the clutches are disengaged. The 600E uses planar
surface bearings and are a bit stiffer even when the mount is newly
assembled. These bearings are a positive in that they help make the
600E extremely stable for a mount of its size. They do, however,
stiffen a bit with age. Your mount's performance will not be
negatively impacted in any way in terms of guiding, tracking, go-to etc.
Wally, our mount supervisor, will be preparing a document for the Tech
Support section of the website that will enable customers to clean and
re-lubricate the bearing surfaces on the 600E. That document will be
some time in preparing. In the mean time, if balancing is a problem,
get yourself a small fisherman's scale of the type used to weigh
bluegills or crappies. Use it on the counterweight shaft safety knob
to pull up and down to balance RA. Hook it on an adapter thumb-screw at
the end of the focuser and pull up and down to balance dec. If you are
balanced, the scale will measure the same in each direction, even if
there is resistance from the bearings.



Mag. 7 skies!



Howard Hedlund

Astro-Physics, Inc.

815-282-1513

________________________________

From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
Of Dale Ireland
Sent: Wednesday, May 30, 2007 10:26 PM
To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [ap-gto] another 600 goto question, drag



When the clutch is disengaged on my 900 it will move with no effort and
the slightest imbalance but my 600 goto requires 2-5 ft/lbs at least to
move in RA or Dec when the clutches are totally released, quite sticky.
Movement is smooth but a lot more resistance than the 900. Tracking and
slewing are fine. Is this normal? There doesn't appear to be
any "damper" screw.
Dale


Re: 600goto problem

Howard Hedlund
 

Dear Mr. Ireland,



It sounds as if your database has corrupted. Given the age of your
unit, it is probably the result of a dead internal battery. The
battery is not difficult to replace, and the database can be uploaded to
the keypad over the internet, but you will first need to check that your
GTOCPx control box has a current enough chip inside. You will also
need to first upgrade the keypad's firmware to at least v.3.20. I would
recommend that you upgrade to v.4.12. Check out the following links
and contact me directly at Astro-Physics for further information. You
will need a username and password for the firmware upload.
howard@astro-physics.com



http://www.astro-physics.com/tech_support/mounts/keypad_update/main_inst
.htm



http://www.astro-physics.com/tech_support/mounts/keypad/keypadbatt.pdf



Mag. 7 skies!



Howard Hedlund

Astro-Physics, Inc.

815-282-1513

________________________________

From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
Of Dale Ireland
Sent: Wednesday, May 30, 2007 9:25 PM
To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [ap-gto] 600goto problem



I have a 600goto circa 2000, I think it is running keypad 3.06.
It tracks fine, my autoguider guides it fine with nice images, 2 star
alignment works fine, it slews and points with Starry night ascom
control no problem to whatever object I click on in Starry Night 6....

However, if I try to use the keypad to goto an object, star, M number
etc it acts like it is in the southern hemisphere saying the object is
below the horizon. I am locked on Vega and ask for M57... it says "41
degrees below horizon"??
I have my location set properly, time, date, N/S switch..
What could cause this? I must be missing something.
I also have a 900 goto and have not used this 600 for a year or so but
all the settings appear correct, could its memory (eprom?) be corrupted
or something?

Dale
direland@drdale.com <mailto:direland%40drdale.com>


another 600 goto question, drag

Dale Ireland <drdale_com@...>
 

When the clutch is disengaged on my 900 it will move with no effort and
the slightest imbalance but my 600 goto requires 2-5 ft/lbs at least to
move in RA or Dec when the clutches are totally released, quite sticky.
Movement is smooth but a lot more resistance than the 900. Tracking and
slewing are fine. Is this normal? There doesn't appear to be
any "damper" screw.
Dale


600goto problem

Dale Ireland <drdale_com@...>
 

I have a 600goto circa 2000, I think it is running keypad 3.06.
It tracks fine, my autoguider guides it fine with nice images, 2 star
alignment works fine, it slews and points with Starry night ascom
control no problem to whatever object I click on in Starry Night 6....

However, if I try to use the keypad to goto an object, star, M number
etc it acts like it is in the southern hemisphere saying the object is
below the horizon. I am locked on Vega and ask for M57... it says "41
degrees below horizon"??
I have my location set properly, time, date, N/S switch..
What could cause this? I must be missing something.
I also have a 900 goto and have not used this 600 for a year or so but
all the settings appear correct, could its memory (eprom?) be corrupted
or something?

Dale
direland@drdale.com


Re: Counter weight transportation

George LaBelle <george.labelle@...>
 

Wood just adds more weight! I use those little "6-pack" coolers
and can get 3 18 lbs in one of them. It is light and soft (in case
you bang into something).

George
Aloha,
Oregon

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Ehlers" <equinerider@...> wrote:

Hi everyone,

I would be interested in seeing any ideas regarding the transport
of
the counterweights. I've been thinking about making wood cases for
the 1200 weights. I observe in various locations so I need a box
or
something to protect them and make easier for transport.

Regards,

Jim Ehlers


Re: Counter weight transportation

Rich N <rnapo@...>
 

Hi Jim,

I do virtually all of my observing away from home, too.

I only use a couple of the 16 Lbs weights. I keep them in my truck
most of the time.

So far, I've not gotten a scratch on the AP900GTO from the two parts
being in cardboard boxes. I have foam lining inside the boxes.

Rich

-
Hi Rich,

Well, my boxes are gone. Should have kept them in the short term.
I always observe away from home so good transport is really critical
for me. With all the loading and unloading I want the equipment
well protected.

Regards,

Jim

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Rich N" <rnapo@...> wrote:
>
> I use the cardboard box my AP weights came in. The same for my
AP 900 GTO
> mount. :-)
>
> Rich
>
>
> Jim -
>
> I use a Pelican Style 1400 case (with the foam insert) to
transport
> my three 9# Mach1GTO counterweights. I chose a case that would
hold
> all three in a minimum amount of space. They fit so snugly that
I
> don't feel the need to add additional padding between the
weights
> themselves.
>
> In choosing a case, I first laid out paper circles (the same
size as
> the outside dimensions of the weights) on my workbench, and
moved
> them around until the configuration looked as compact as
possible. I
> then measured the rectangle that just contained the
configuration.
> Measured the thickness of the weights. Added about a quarter
inch to
> the measurements - these measurements became the minimum
internal
> dimensions of the case.
>
> One factor I considered was the maximum total weight of the
> counterweights I was going to carry at one time. 35 lbs is about
my
> limit, especially when walking around a strange observing site
at
> night. I try to lift the case with two hands, avoiding straining
one
> wrist. I wish I had two handles on the sides of the case instead
of
> only one handle at the top.
>
> Don't know how many and how heavy are the weights you are
planning to
> haul, but my advice is to limit how much weight you will be
lifting
> at one time to what's comfortable for you. Better a couple of
extra
> trips back and forth when setting up or tearing down than 2-3
days
> nursing a sore back and/or hands.
>
> Clear Skies (something we haven't seen too much of here lately
> in "May Gray" coastal Sounthern California)
>
> Jerry
>
> --- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Ehlers" <equinerider@> wrote:
> >
> > Hi everyone,
> >
> > I would be interested in seeing any ideas regarding the
transport of
> > the counterweights. I've been thinking about making wood cases
for
> > the 1200 weights. I observe in various locations so I need a
box or
> > something to protect them and make easier for transport.
> >
> > Regards,
> >
> > Jim Ehlers
> >
>
>
>
>
>
>
>


Re: Counter weight transportation

Jim Ehlers
 

Hi Rich,

Well, my boxes are gone. Should have kept them in the short term.
I always observe away from home so good transport is really critical
for me. With all the loading and unloading I want the equipment
well protected.

Regards,

Jim

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Rich N" <rnapo@...> wrote:

I use the cardboard box my AP weights came in. The same for my
AP 900 GTO
mount. :-)

Rich


Jim -

I use a Pelican Style 1400 case (with the foam insert) to
transport
my three 9# Mach1GTO counterweights. I chose a case that would
hold
all three in a minimum amount of space. They fit so snugly that
I
don't feel the need to add additional padding between the
weights
themselves.

In choosing a case, I first laid out paper circles (the same
size as
the outside dimensions of the weights) on my workbench, and
moved
them around until the configuration looked as compact as
possible. I
then measured the rectangle that just contained the
configuration.
Measured the thickness of the weights. Added about a quarter
inch to
the measurements - these measurements became the minimum
internal
dimensions of the case.

One factor I considered was the maximum total weight of the
counterweights I was going to carry at one time. 35 lbs is about
my
limit, especially when walking around a strange observing site
at
night. I try to lift the case with two hands, avoiding straining
one
wrist. I wish I had two handles on the sides of the case instead
of
only one handle at the top.

Don't know how many and how heavy are the weights you are
planning to
haul, but my advice is to limit how much weight you will be
lifting
at one time to what's comfortable for you. Better a couple of
extra
trips back and forth when setting up or tearing down than 2-3
days
nursing a sore back and/or hands.

Clear Skies (something we haven't seen too much of here lately
in "May Gray" coastal Sounthern California)

Jerry

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Ehlers" <equinerider@> wrote:
>
> Hi everyone,
>
> I would be interested in seeing any ideas regarding the
transport of
> the counterweights. I've been thinking about making wood cases
for
> the 1200 weights. I observe in various locations so I need a
box or
> something to protect them and make easier for transport.
>
> Regards,
>
> Jim Ehlers
>





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Counter weight transportation

Jim Ehlers
 

Hi,

Great idea. I really like you comments on transport and keeping an
eye on the max weight. I agree, pretty much no more than two
weights at a time. That would be 36 pounds per case.

I have an old Unitron refractor with a weight drive and made a case
for those weights. The case is great but it took time. I have less
time now with two kids.

Regards,

Jim


--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "hieronym55" <jer55-yaaahooo@...>
wrote:

Jim -

I use a Pelican Style 1400 case (with the foam insert) to
transport
my three 9# Mach1GTO counterweights. I chose a case that would
hold
all three in a minimum amount of space. They fit so snugly that I
don't feel the need to add additional padding between the weights
themselves.

In choosing a case, I first laid out paper circles (the same size
as
the outside dimensions of the weights) on my workbench, and moved
them around until the configuration looked as compact as possible.
I
then measured the rectangle that just contained the configuration.
Measured the thickness of the weights. Added about a quarter inch
to
the measurements - these measurements became the minimum internal
dimensions of the case.

One factor I considered was the maximum total weight of the
counterweights I was going to carry at one time. 35 lbs is about
my
limit, especially when walking around a strange observing site at
night. I try to lift the case with two hands, avoiding straining
one
wrist. I wish I had two handles on the sides of the case instead
of
only one handle at the top.

Don't know how many and how heavy are the weights you are planning
to
haul, but my advice is to limit how much weight you will be
lifting
at one time to what's comfortable for you. Better a couple of
extra
trips back and forth when setting up or tearing down than 2-3 days
nursing a sore back and/or hands.

Clear Skies (something we haven't seen too much of here lately
in "May Gray" coastal Sounthern California)

Jerry

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Ehlers" <equinerider@> wrote:

Hi everyone,

I would be interested in seeing any ideas regarding the
transport of
the counterweights. I've been thinking about making wood cases
for
the 1200 weights. I observe in various locations so I need a
box or
something to protect them and make easier for transport.

Regards,

Jim Ehlers


Re: Counter weight transportation

Jim Ehlers
 

Hi,

I saw the photograph but it's hard to make out how the thing is put
together or retained. Some of those cases are great but cost as
much as the weights!

Regards,

Jim


--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Rick K" <JunkMailGoesHere@...> wrote:

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Ehlers" <equinerider@> wrote:

Hi everyone,

I would be interested in seeing any ideas regarding the
transport of
the counterweights. I've been thinking about making wood cases
for
the 1200 weights. I observe in various locations so I need a
box or
something to protect them and make easier for transport.

Regards,

Jim Ehlers

Here is one idea straight from the photo gallery of this forum:

http://tech.ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gto/photos/view/83c1?b=1


I personally use some surplus heavy duty aluminum boxes similar to
Scopeguard cases which fit up to three counterweights with foam to
keep everything separated and protected. Unfortunately I can no
longer
get these boxes. Making boxes or getting some made is probably
worth
the effort and cost considering the cost of replacement of the
stainless counterweights.


Re: Counter weight transportation

Jim Ehlers
 

This is a great idea. What size ammo container are you using and
where did you find them. I'm moving about six 18 pound wights so I'll
need a few of them?

Regards,

Jim

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Lane Davis" <lane_davis@...> wrote:

I use a military surplus ammo case with some old carpet fitted as a
liner. I then use squares of carpet as dividers between the three
weights I use (all three fit in one case). The size is perfect, they
are sealed against the weather, almost industructable - and cheap!


Re: Counter weight transportation

Rich N <rnapo@...>
 

I use the cardboard box my AP weights came in. The same for my AP 900 GTO
mount. :-)

Rich


Jim -

I use a Pelican Style 1400 case (with the foam insert) to transport
my three 9# Mach1GTO counterweights. I chose a case that would hold
all three in a minimum amount of space. They fit so snugly that I
don't feel the need to add additional padding between the weights
themselves.

In choosing a case, I first laid out paper circles (the same size as
the outside dimensions of the weights) on my workbench, and moved
them around until the configuration looked as compact as possible. I
then measured the rectangle that just contained the configuration.
Measured the thickness of the weights. Added about a quarter inch to
the measurements - these measurements became the minimum internal
dimensions of the case.

One factor I considered was the maximum total weight of the
counterweights I was going to carry at one time. 35 lbs is about my
limit, especially when walking around a strange observing site at
night. I try to lift the case with two hands, avoiding straining one
wrist. I wish I had two handles on the sides of the case instead of
only one handle at the top.

Don't know how many and how heavy are the weights you are planning to
haul, but my advice is to limit how much weight you will be lifting
at one time to what's comfortable for you. Better a couple of extra
trips back and forth when setting up or tearing down than 2-3 days
nursing a sore back and/or hands.

Clear Skies (something we haven't seen too much of here lately
in "May Gray" coastal Sounthern California)

Jerry

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Ehlers" <equinerider@...> wrote:
>
> Hi everyone,
>
> I would be interested in seeing any ideas regarding the transport of
> the counterweights. I've been thinking about making wood cases for
> the 1200 weights. I observe in various locations so I need a box or
> something to protect them and make easier for transport.
>
> Regards,
>
> Jim Ehlers
>


Re: Counter weight transportation

Jerome Kostro
 

Jim -

I use a Pelican Style 1400 case (with the foam insert) to transport
my three 9# Mach1GTO counterweights. I chose a case that would hold
all three in a minimum amount of space. They fit so snugly that I
don't feel the need to add additional padding between the weights
themselves.

In choosing a case, I first laid out paper circles (the same size as
the outside dimensions of the weights) on my workbench, and moved
them around until the configuration looked as compact as possible. I
then measured the rectangle that just contained the configuration.
Measured the thickness of the weights. Added about a quarter inch to
the measurements - these measurements became the minimum internal
dimensions of the case.

One factor I considered was the maximum total weight of the
counterweights I was going to carry at one time. 35 lbs is about my
limit, especially when walking around a strange observing site at
night. I try to lift the case with two hands, avoiding straining one
wrist. I wish I had two handles on the sides of the case instead of
only one handle at the top.

Don't know how many and how heavy are the weights you are planning to
haul, but my advice is to limit how much weight you will be lifting
at one time to what's comfortable for you. Better a couple of extra
trips back and forth when setting up or tearing down than 2-3 days
nursing a sore back and/or hands.

Clear Skies (something we haven't seen too much of here lately
in "May Gray" coastal Sounthern California)

Jerry

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Ehlers" <equinerider@...> wrote:

Hi everyone,

I would be interested in seeing any ideas regarding the transport of
the counterweights. I've been thinking about making wood cases for
the 1200 weights. I observe in various locations so I need a box or
something to protect them and make easier for transport.

Regards,

Jim Ehlers


Re: Counter weight transportation

Jerome Kostro
 

Jim -

I use a Pelican Style 1400 case (with the foam insert) to transport
my three 9# Mach1GTO counterweights. I chose a case that would hold
all three in a minimum amount of space. They fit so snugly that I
don't feel the need to add additional padding between the weights
themselves.

In choosing a case, I first laid out paper circles (the same size as
the outside dimensions of the weights) on my workbench, and moved
them around until the configuration looked as compact as possible. I
then measured the rectangle that just contained the configuration.
Measured the thickness of the weights. Added about a quarter inch to
the measurements - these measurements became the minimum internal
dimensions of the case.

One factor I considered was the maximum total weight of the
counterweights I was going to carry at one time. 35 lbs is about my
limit, especially when walking around a strange observing site at
night. I try to lift the case with two hands, avoiding straining one
wrist. I wish I had two handles on the sides of the case instead of
only one handle at the top.

Don't know how many and how heavy are the weights you are planning to
haul, but my advice is to limit how much weight you will be lifting
at one time to what's comfortable for you. Better a couple of extra
trips back and forth when setting up or tearing down than 2-3 days
nursing a sore back and/or hands.

Clear Skies (something we haven't seen too much of here lately
in "May Gray" coastal Sounthern California)

Jerry

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Ehlers" <equinerider@...> wrote:

Hi everyone,

I would be interested in seeing any ideas regarding the transport of
the counterweights. I've been thinking about making wood cases for
the 1200 weights. I observe in various locations so I need a box or
something to protect them and make easier for transport.

Regards,

Jim Ehlers


Re: Counter weight transportation

observe_m13
 

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Ehlers" <equinerider@...> wrote:

Hi everyone,

I would be interested in seeing any ideas regarding the transport of
the counterweights. I've been thinking about making wood cases for
the 1200 weights. I observe in various locations so I need a box or
something to protect them and make easier for transport.

Regards,

Jim Ehlers

Here is one idea straight from the photo gallery of this forum:

http://tech.ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gto/photos/view/83c1?b=1


I personally use some surplus heavy duty aluminum boxes similar to
Scopeguard cases which fit up to three counterweights with foam to
keep everything separated and protected. Unfortunately I can no longer
get these boxes. Making boxes or getting some made is probably worth
the effort and cost considering the cost of replacement of the
stainless counterweights.