November 2021 Red Beaver Moon


eja24601
 

November 18 was started off mostly cloudy, but the forecasts (TV meteorologists included) all pointed to clear skies for the eclipse. With that in mind, I got up at 1AM to start preparing for a go at capturing a sequence. Unfortunately, despite forecasts (Astrospheric and the Clear Sky Clock included) for a partly cloudy sky at that time, it was overcast. The Beaver Moon did punch through some sucker holes and thinning layers long enough for me to come to focus with my telescope/camera. However, the clouds stubbornly hung around. 2:30 came and went with no signs of the clouds dispersing. I finally decided to try and nap until 3:30. I tossed and turned restlessly and finally decided to check conditions around 3:20. Lo and behold, the clouds had parted, with the eclipse partway through.

I hurried to our telescope, consoling myself that if I wouldn't be able to capture a sequence, I would at least attempt an HDR composite. Other than a thin cloud that seemed to mock my first attempt at bracketed exposures, the sky remained clear for the rest of the night. I shot a sequence of bracketed exposures all the way through about 5:45AM, so I have a lot of data to play with as I attempt other HDR composites.

In between capturing images, I thought for a change to view the eclipse visually with a scope. Binoculars views were good but shaky (hand-held, no surprise). So I brought out a Borg 76ED and gazed visually. The view with a 15mm TV Plossl was mesmerizing. My HDR composite is a weak attempt at capturing what I saw through the eyepiece.

That said, here is an attempt at an HDR composite of the eclipse near maximum (taken around 4:05AM). This was taken with a Canon Digital Rebel t6i through a TMB-152 scope riding on an Astro-Physics AP1200GTO mount. This is radically reduced from the original 4000 x 6000-sized image.

Enjoy,
Eric

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