Re: VIDEO - Mach2 Right Ascension Belt Adjustment


M Hambrick
 

I am going off topic a little bit here, but many of us who started driving in the 1970's will remember the introduction of these toothed rubber timing belts in automobile engines. Prior to this the timing was always maintained with chain sprockets.

Belt driven engine timing got a really bad rap in the US, and deservedly so because the US carmakers chose to introduce this concept on the really cheap cars like the Chevy Vega, Ford pinto, etc. The life expectancy of these timing belts was supposed to be about 30,000 miles. I was working as an auto mechanic in those days, and our shop saw a lot of cars come in with engines that had to be almost completely rebuilt because the timing belts broke while the cars were going down the road at 55 mph.

In the late 1980's a new type of hydrogenated nitrile rubber was introduced onto the market that was designed for use in hot, oily environments, and most of the timing belts were converted over to this new polymer. I think that Kevlar also showed up at about the same time. Now, most timing belts will last at least 100,000 miles.

Mike

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