Re: Re-lubing Mach1


Mike Shade
 

When I took my 1600 apart, while there was some grease on the worm, the big gear was somewhat devoid of grease...I cleaned up as much from the worm as I could and applied a fair amount of Aeroshell...also to the big gear.  Strangely this lowered my PE a fair amount.  Anyways the seven year old grease on your mount may be somewhat "gummy" and some new grease might help things a bit.  My 1600 is in operation some 300 nights a year or so, not sure how much your Mach-1 gets used.  You will of course need to generate another PEC curve when everything goes back together...as well as remesh your gears...

 

I cleaned as much of the old grease off as possible with an old toothbrush and some clean paper towels...

 

Mike J. Shade: mshade@q.com

Mike J. Shade Photography:

mshadephotography.com

 

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In Defeat: Defiance

In Victory: Magnanimity

In Peace: Goodwill

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Already, in the gathering dusk, a few of the stars are turning on their lights.

Vega, the brightest one, is now dropping towards the west.  Can it be half

a year since I watched her April rising in the east?  Low in the southwest

Antares blinks a sad farwell to fall...

Leslie Peltier, Starlight Nights

 

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From: ap-gto@... [mailto:ap-gto@...]
Sent: Sunday, October 08, 2017 2:53 PM
To: ap-gto@...
Subject: [ap-gto] Re-lubing Mach1

 

 

My Mach1, dating from Feb 2010, has the old-style gearbox.  I've removed the RA motor.  This is the first time I've done anything other than occasional remeshing since I received the mount.  I've never touched the DEC motor.  The meshing screws fell inside the gearbox, so I removed the back cover to poke the screws back through their holes.

 

First surprise: The tension spring is not at all arranged as I had expected.  I thought it had holes in it for the screws and that it laid flat against the back of the gearbox.  I thought the spring pushed backwards against the screws.  That's not what I've found.

 

Second surprise: Neither the worm nor the worm gear are "dry" or in any respect lacking lubricant.  There's lots of grease on the gears.  This explains why it continues to seep through the seams of the gearbox.  I do not see noticeable dirt or debris on the gears.

 

Is there any compelling reason that I should re-lube the gears at all?

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