Re: Broken clutch knob


Mlooker
 

Pete,
If the hole is not blind meaning the broken off blot is not rammed in tight (maybe use a pick and see if it moves). The easiest way I've found to extract a bolt is to use a left hand drill bit. Snap On sells a 5 piece set, just reverse your drill and usually the second you touch the broken bolt it spins right out.

Sometimes you need to use a center punch to create a starting point but you must determine that with your situation.

Tom

----- Original Message -----
From: Peter Santangeli
To: ap-gto@...
Sent: Saturday, December 15, 2007 2:13 PM
Subject: [ap-gto] Re: Broken clutch knob



Indeed the problem is bad... that part I'm holding is supposed to be
at least 3/4 of an inch long. The rest is in the mount.

Pete

--- In ap-gto@..., "Rick K" <JunkMailGoesHere@...> wrote:
>
> I am totally confused. If this is the problem, toss it in the garbage
> and order a new one from AP on Monday.
>
> I thought you were talking about the mount having a problem with a
> broken off threaded section in the mount itself. That is serious and
> is what a picture of would be worth a 1000 words.
>
> Rick.
>
>
> --- In ap-gto@..., "Peter Santangeli" <peter@> wrote:
> >
> >
> > Maybe a picture is indeed worth 1000 words... Here is a shot of the
> > broken knob:
> >
> > http://www.santangeli.net/knob.jpg
> >
> > As you can see, the device is actually a hollow threaded aluminum tube
> > with the knob part screwed into it. The walls of the tube are not that
> > thick, but should take quite a bit of torque without breaking. All I
> > can assume is that the knob got banged longitudinally somehow, and the
> > tube broke.
> >
> > The rest of the tube (with the "outer" thread) is unfortunately still
> > in the mount.
> >
> > Pete
> >
> >
> > --- In ap-gto@..., Gregory Nottingham <gnpnotti@> wrote:
> > >
> > > My experience using Eazy Outs on exhaust studs on cylinder heads
has
> > > not been good. I know that the telescope situation is different.
> > > What is the diameter of screw? As long as you are sure that screw
> > > isn't cross-threaded, you should be alright but every-time I've
used
> > > one, I have gone in with the assumption that I will have to take
the
> > > head to a machine shop to drill out the stud and the broken,
> hardened
> > > steel Easy Out.
> > > Good luck.
> > > Greg
> > > On Dec 15, 2007, at 2:01, Peter Santangeli wrote:
> > >
> > > >
> > > > Good suggestion. I was thinking about something like this.
> > > >
> > > > Pete
> > > >
> > > > --- In ap-gto@..., kawasaki99@ wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > > Hello Strong Man,
> > > > > Local hardware store ought to sell an (easy-out)
> > > > which is a
> > > > > sort of a left hand thread tap and the proper size pilot drill
> > > > for the
> > > > > easy-out. If it's only hand tight to ought to come out. Have an
> > > > assistant hold a
> > > > > vacuum cleaner hose close to broken screw while drilling the
pilot
> > > > hole to
> > > > > capture any small chips. A small center drill or sharp prick
punch
> > > > may be necessary
> > > > > to ensure the pilot drill puts the hole close to the true
> center of
> > > > the
> > > > > broken screw. Sounds like a lot but it's generally easy.
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > > **************************************See AOL's top rated
recipes
> > > > >
(http://food.aol.com/top-rated-recipes?NCID=aoltop00030000000004)
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> >
>

Join main@ap-gto.groups.io to automatically receive all group messages.