Re: multispectral imaging was RE: Re: New images with the 140EDF refractor


Rick Thurmond
 

I might be interested in whether the bird was approaching me or leaving
me. Or perhaps rotating. How difficult would it be to find some
narrowband filters tuned a little above or below laboratory emission line
values so you could do doppler imaging? Could that be done with an
amateur scope?

If I were to want to image a bird for scientific purposes I'd probably be
interested in a thermal profile, an optical profile and possibly a UV
reflectivity profile if it were imaged in the outdoors in the sun. It
might be interesting to examine the bird in polarized light too. You never
know until you try.

In short in knowing a thing or two about the target, I would choose the
appropriate wavelengths to do a multi or hyperspectral analysis of the
bird.

By analogy when one uses nebular diagnostic filters, as narrowband
emission line filters are occasionally called by scientists, for imaging
nebulae, you actually deconstruct the nebula and can observe features
that may otherwise be obscured by broadband radiation.

an example of alternate ways to image the same object can be found in
this image, all shot from my backyard in mag 3 light polluted skies with
my 18" defective telescope mounted on an AP1200GTO mount and guided with
an ST7E on a lumicon giant easy guider with reducer.

http://www.narrowbandimaging.com/images/crisp_crab_5_ways_to_sunday_vga.jpg

each method was specifically chosen to reveal different aspects of this
most interesting laboratory in the sky.

I just like having a toolkit to let me do something a bit off the well
travelled road for the sheer adventure of the journey.


Jeff Young <jey@adobe.com> wrote:
> I wonder what kind of reaction you would get if you could
image a bird
in Ha,
SII, and OIII and manipulated the mapped colors so that the result
looked cool?
I think maybe it would look artistic but I think people would want to
see the
real colors.
I dunno. I think Andy Warhol's stuff commands a higher price than Ansel
Adams'.

But I do agree that a narrowband image should be obviously labelled
(somehow).
That's one problem Mr. Warhol didn't have as he chose everyday objects
-- so
his viewers knew what they were "supposed" to look like.

-- Jeff.


________________________________

From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of Ray Gralak
Sent: Thursday, August 09, 2007 1:33 AM
To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [ap-gto] Re: New images with the 140EDF refractor



I don't think they find much value in RGB or LRGB images.

I find them exceedingly boring quite frankly.
You may find them boring but unlike false color images they
attempt to reflect
reality. :-)

I wonder what kind of reaction you would get if you could image
a bird in Ha,
SII, and OIII and manipulated the mapped colors so that the
result looked cool?
I think maybe it would look artistic but I think people would
want to see the
real colors.

-Ray














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